Imperial College London

Dr Richard J. Gill

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2215r.gill Website

 
 
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Location

 

N2.13MunroSilwood Park

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Samuelson:2020:10.1007/s13592-020-00758-1,
author = {Samuelson, A and Gill, R and Leadbeater, E},
doi = {10.1007/s13592-020-00758-1},
journal = {Apidologie},
title = {Urbanisation is associated with reduced Nosema sp. infection, higher colony strength and higher richness of foraged pollen in honeybees},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13592-020-00758-1},
year = {2020}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Bees are vital pollinators, but are faced with numerous threats that include loss of floral resources and emerging parasites amongst others. Urbanisation is a rapidly expanding driver of land-use change that may interact with these two major threats to bees. Here we investigated effects of urbanisation on food store quality and colony health in honeybees (Apis mellifera) by sampling 51 hives in four different land-use categories: urban, suburban, rural open and rural wooded during two seasons (spring and autumn). We found positive effects of urban land use on colony strength and richness of stored pollen morphotypes, alongside lower late-season Nosema sp. infection in urban and suburban colonies. Our results reveal that honeybees exhibit lower colony performance in strength in rural areas, adding to the growing evidence that modern agricultural landscapes can constitute poor habitat for insect pollinators.
AU - Samuelson,A
AU - Gill,R
AU - Leadbeater,E
DO - 10.1007/s13592-020-00758-1
PY - 2020///
SN - 0044-8435
TI - Urbanisation is associated with reduced Nosema sp. infection, higher colony strength and higher richness of foraged pollen in honeybees
T2 - Apidologie
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13592-020-00758-1
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/77996
ER -