Imperial College London

ProfessorRobertWilkinson

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Infectious Disease

Professor in Infectious Diseases
 
 
 
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Contact

 

r.j.wilkinson Website

 
 
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Location

 

Commonwealth BuildingHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

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461 results found

Hussey H, Davies M-A, Heekes A, Williamson C, Valley-Omar Z, Hardie D, Korsman S, Doolabh D, Preiser W, Maponga T, Iranzadeh A, Wasserman S, Boloko L, Symons G, Raubenheimer P, Parker A, Schrueder N, Solomon W, Rousseau P, Wolter N, Jassat W, Cohen C, Lessells R, Wilkinson RJ, Boulle A, Hsiao N-Yet al., 2022, Assessing the clinical severity of the Omicron variant in the Western Cape Province, South Africa, using the diagnostic PCR proxy marker of RdRp target delay to distinguish between Omicron and Delta infections - a survival analysis, International Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol: 118, Pages: 150-154, ISSN: 1201-9712

BACKGROUND: The extent to which the reduced risk of severe disease seen with SARS-CoV-2 Omicron is due to a decrease in variant virulence, or higher levels of population immunity, is currently not clear. METHODS: RdRp target delay (RTD) in the Seegene AllplexTM 2019-nCoV PCR assay is a proxy marker for the Delta variant. The absence of this proxy marker in the transition period was used to identify suspected Omicron infections. Cox regression was performed for the outcome of hospital admission in those who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 on the Seegene AllplexTM assay from 1 November to 14 December 2021 in the Western Cape Province, South Africa, public sector. Vaccination status and prior diagnosed infection, were adjusted for. RESULTS: 150 cases with RTD and 1486 cases without RTD were included. Cases without RTD had a lower hazard of admission (adjusted Hazard Ratio [aHR] of 0.56, 95%CI 0.34-0.91). Complete vaccination was protective of admission with an aHR of 0.45 (95%CI 0.26-0.77). CONCLUSION: Omicron has resulted in a lower risk of hospital admission, compared to contemporaneous Delta infection, when using the proxy marker of RTD. Under-ascertainment of reinfections with an immune escape variant remains a challenge to accurately assessing variant virulence.

Journal article

Davies M-A, Kassanjee R, Rousseau P, Morden E, Johnson L, Solomon W, Hsiao N-Y, Hussey H, Meintjes G, Paleker M, Jacobs T, Raubenheimer P, Heekes A, Dane P, Bam J-L, Smith M, Preiser W, Pienaar D, Mendelson M, Naude J, Schrueder N, Mnguni A, Le Roux S, Murie K, Prozesky H, Mahomed H, Rossouw L, Wasserman S, Maughan D, Boloko L, Smith B, Taljaard J, Symons G, Ntusi NAB, Parker A, Wolter N, Jassat W, Cohen C, Lessells R, Wilkinson RJ, Arendse J, Kariem S, Moodley M, Wolmarans M, Cloete K, Boulle A, Western Cape and South African National Departments of Health in collaboration with the National Institute for Communicable Diseases in South Africa Affiliationset al., 2022, Outcomes of laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in the Omicron-driven fourth wave compared with previous waves in the Western Cape Province, South Africa., Tropical medicine & international health : TM & IH, ISSN: 1360-2276

<h4>Objectives</h4>The objective was to compare COVID-19 outcomes in the Omicron-driven fourth wave with prior waves in the Western Cape, assess the contribution of undiagnosed prior infection to differences in outcomes in a context of high seroprevalence due to prior infection and determine whether protection against severe disease conferred by prior infection and/or vaccination was maintained.<h4>Methods</h4>In this cohort study, we included public sector patients aged ≥20 years with a laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis between 14 November and 11 December 2021 (wave four) and equivalent prior wave periods. We compared the risk between waves of the following outcomes using Cox regression: death, severe hospitalisation or death and any hospitalisation or death (all ≤14 days after diagnosis) adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, geography, vaccination and prior infection.<h4>Results</h4>We included 5144 patients from wave four and 11,609 from prior waves. The risk of all outcomes was lower in wave four compared to the Delta-driven wave three (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] for death 0.27 [0.19; 0.38]. Risk reduction was lower when adjusting for vaccination and prior diagnosed infection (aHR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.29; 0.59) and reduced further when accounting for unascertained prior infections (aHR: 0.72). Vaccine protection was maintained in wave four (aHR for outcome of death: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.10; 0.58).<h4>Conclusions</h4>In the Omicron-driven wave, severe COVID-19 outcomes were reduced mostly due to protection conferred by prior infection and/or vaccination, but intrinsically reduced virulence may account for a modest reduction in risk of severe hospitalisation or death compared to the Delta-driven wave.

Journal article

Fendler A, Shepherd STC, Au L, Wilkinson KA, Wu M, Schmitt AM, Tippu Z, Farag S, Rogiers A, Harvey R, Carlyle E, Edmonds K, Del Rosario L, Lingard K, Mangwende M, Holt L, Ahmod H, Korteweg J, Foley T, Barber T, Emslie-Henry A, Caulfield-Lynch N, Byrne F, Shum B, Gerard CL, Deng D, Kjaer S, Song O-R, Queval C, Kavanagh C, Wall EC, Carr EJ, Namjou S, Caidan S, Gavrielides M, MacRae JI, Kelly G, Peat K, Kelly D, Murra A, Kelly K, O'Flaherty M, Shea RL, Gardner G, Murray D, Popat S, Yousaf N, Jhanji S, Van As N, Young K, Furness AJS, Pickering L, Beale R, Swanton C, Crick COVID19 consortium, Gandhi S, Gamblin S, Bauer DLV, Kassiotis G, Howell M, Nicholson E, Walker S, Wilkinson RJ, Larkin J, Turajlic S, CAPTURE consortiumet al., 2022, Immune responses following third COVID-19 vaccination are reduced in patients with hematological malignancies compared to patients with solid cancer., Cancer Cell, Vol: 40, Pages: 438-438, ISSN: 1535-6108

In this report from the CAPTURE study (NCT03226886), we demonstrate that a third dose of COVID-19 vaccine boosts neutralizing antibody (NAb) and cellular responses in patients with cancer, including those that had undetectable NAb titers (NAbT) following two vaccine doses or for whom NAbT waned. We have noted that one key member of the CAPTURE consortium—Sanjay Popat—was inadvertently not included in the author list. We now include him as a co-author. There are no additional changes to the declaration of interests statement, since Dr. Popat declares no competing conflict of interest. This author list change is now reflected in the online version of this letter.

Journal article

Mbandi SK, Painter H, Penn-Nicholson A, Toefy A, Erasmus M, Hanekom WA, Scriba TJ, Lai RPJ, Marais S, Fletcher HA, Meintjes G, Wilkinson RJ, Cotton MF, Pahwa S, Cameron MJ, Nemes Eet al., 2022, Host transcriptomic signatures of tuberculosis can predict immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV patients., Eur J Immunol

Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) can be a complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in patients with advanced HIV, but its pathogenesis is uncertain. In tuberculosis (TB) endemic countries, IRIS is often associated with mycobacterial infections or Bacille-Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination in children. With no predictive or confirmatory tests at present, IRIS remains a diagnosis of exclusion. We tested whether RISK6 and Sweeney3, validated immune-based blood transcriptomic signatures for TB, could predict or diagnose IRIS in HIV+ children and adults. Transcripts were measured by RT-qPCR in BCG-vaccinated children and by microarray in HIV+ adults with TB including TB meningitis (TBM). Signature scores before ART initiation and up to IRIS diagnosis were compared between participants who did or did not develop IRIS. In children, RISK6 and Sweeney3 discriminated IRIS cases from non-IRIS controls before ART, and at diagnosis. In adults with TB, RISK6 discriminated IRIS cases from controls after half-week on ART and at TB-IRIS onset. In adults with TBM, only Sweeney3 discriminated IRIS cases from controls before ART, while both signatures distinguished cases from controls at TB-IRIS onset. Parsimonious whole blood transcriptomic signatures for TB showed potential to predict and diagnose IRIS in HIV+ children and adults.

Journal article

Keeton R, Tincho MB, Ngomti A, Baguma R, Benede N, Suzuki A, Khan K, Cele S, Bernstein M, Karim F, Madzorera SV, Moyo-Gwete T, Mennen M, Skelem S, Adriaanse M, Mutithu D, Aremu O, Stek C, du Bruyn E, Van Der Mescht MA, de Beer Z, de Villiers TR, Bodenstein A, van den Berg G, Mendes A, Strydom A, Venter M, Giandhari J, Naidoo Y, Pillay S, Tegally H, Grifoni A, Weiskopf D, Sette A, Wilkinson RJ, de Oliveira T, Bekker L-G, Gray G, Ueckermann V, Rossouw T, Boswell MT, Bhiman JN, Moore PL, Sigal A, Ntusi NAB, Burgers WA, Riou Cet al., 2022, Author Correction: T cell responses to SARS-CoV-2 spike cross-recognize Omicron., Nature, Vol: 604, Pages: E25-E25, ISSN: 0028-0836

Journal article

Martin DP, Lytras S, Lucaci AG, Maier W, Grüning B, Shank SD, Weaver S, MacLean OA, Orton RJ, Lemey P, Boni MF, Tegally H, Harkins G, Scheepers C, Bhiman JN, Everatt J, Amoako DG, San JE, Giandhari J, Sigal A, NGS-SA, Williamson C, Hsiao N-Y, von Gottberg A, De Klerk A, Shafer RW, Robertson DL, Wilkinson RJ, Sewell BT, Lessells R, Nekrutenko A, Greaney AJ, Starr TN, Bloom JD, Murrell B, Wilkinson E, Gupta RK, de Oliveira T, Kosakovsky Pond SLet al., 2022, Selection analysis identifies unusual clustered mutational changes in Omicron lineage BA.1 that likely impact Spike function., Publisher: BioRxiv

Among the 30 non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions in the Omicron S-gene are 13 that have only rarely been seen in other SARS-CoV-2 sequences. These mutations cluster within three functionally important regions of the S-gene at sites that will likely impact (i) interactions between subunits of the Spike trimer and the predisposition of subunits to shift from down to up configurations, (ii) interactions of Spike with ACE2 receptors, and (iii) the priming of Spike for membrane fusion. We show here that, based on both the rarity of these 13 mutations in intrapatient sequencing reads and patterns of selection at the codon sites where the mutations occur in SARS-CoV-2 and related sarbecoviruses, prior to the emergence of Omicron the mutations would have been predicted to decrease the fitness of any genomes within which they occurred. We further propose that the mutations in each of the three clusters therefore cooperatively interact to both mitigate their individual fitness costs, and adaptively alter the function of Spike. Given the evident epidemic growth advantages of Omicron over all previously known SARS-CoV-2 lineages, it is crucial to determine both how such complex and highly adaptive mutation constellations were assembled within the Omicron S-gene, and why, despite unprecedented global genomic surveillance efforts, the early stages of this assembly process went completely undetected.

Working paper

Gupte A, Kumar P, Araújo-Pereira M, Kulkarni V, Paradkar M, Pradhan N, Menon P, Darasini P, Hanna L-E, Shivakumar SVBY, Rockwood NS, Du Bruyn E, Karyakarte R, Gaikwad S, Bollinger R, Golub J, Gupte N, Viswanathan V, Wilkinson RJ, Mave V, Babu S, Kornfeld H, Andrade BB, Gupta Aet al., 2022, Baseline IL-6 is a biomarker for unfavorable tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a multi-site discovery and validation study, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 59, ISSN: 0903-1936

Background: Biomarkers of unfavorable tuberculosis treatment outcomes are needed to accelerate new drug and regimen development. Whether plasma cytokine levels can predict unfavorable tuberculosis treatment outcomes is unclear. Methods: We identified and internally validated the association between 20 a-priori selected plasma inflammatory markers and unfavorable treatment outcomes of failure, recurrence and all-cause mortality among adults with drug-sensitive pulmonary tuberculosis in India. We externally validated these findings in two independent cohorts of predominantly diabetic and HIV coinfected tuberculosis patients in India and South Africa, respectively. Results: Pre-treatment IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-6 were associated with treatment failure in the discovery analysis. Internal validation confirmed higher pre-treatment IL-6 concentrations among failure cases compared to controls. External validation among predominantly diabetic tuberculosis patients found an association between pre59 treatment IL-6 concentrations and subsequent recurrence and death. Similarly, external validation among predominantly HIV coinfected tuberculosis patients found an association between pre-treatment IL-6 concentrations and subsequent treatment failure and death. In a pooled analysis of 363 tuberculosis cases from the Indian and South African validation cohorts, high pre-treatment IL-6 concentrations were associated with higher risk of failure (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=2.16, 95%CI 1.08-4.33, p=0.02), recurrence (aOR=5.36, 95%CI 2.48-11.57, p<0.001) and death (aOR=4.62, 95%CI 1.95-10.95, p<0.001). Adding baseline IL-6 to a risk-prediction model comprising of low BMI, high smear grade and cavitation improved model performance by 15 percent (C-statistic of 0.66 versus 0.76, p=0.02). Conclusion: Pre-treatment IL-6 is a biomarker for unfavorable tuberculosis treatment outcomes. Future studies should identify optimal IL-6 concentrations for point-of-care risk prediction.

Journal article

Martin DP, Spyros L, Lucaci AG, Maier W, Gruning B, Shank SD, Weaver S, MacLean OA, Orton RJ, Lemey P, Boni MF, Tegally H, Harkins GW, Scheepers C, Bhiman JN, Everatt J, Amoako DG, San JE, Giandhari J, Sigal A, Williamson C, Hsiao N-Y, von Gottberg A, De Klerk A, Shafer RW, Robertson DL, Wilkinson RJ, Sewell TS, Lessells R, Nekrutenko A, Greaney AJ, Starr TN, Bloom JD, Murrell B, Wilkinson E, Gupta RK, de Oliveira T, Kosakovsky Pond SLet al., 2022, Selection analysis identifies clusters of unusual mutational changes in Omicron lineage BA.1 that likely impact Spike function, Molecular Biology and Evolution, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0737-4038

Among the 30 non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions in the Omicron S-gene are 13 that have only rarely been seen in other SARS-CoV-2 sequences. These mutations cluster within three functionally important regions of the S-gene at sites that will likely impact (i) interactions between subunits of the Spike trimer and the predisposition of subunits to shift from down to up configurations, (ii) interactions of Spike with ACE2 receptors, and (iii) the priming of Spike for membrane fusion. We show here that, based on both the rarity of these 13 mutations inintrapatient sequencing reads and patterns of selection at the codon sites where the mutations occur in SARS-CoV-2 and related sarbecoviruses, prior to the emergence of Omicron the mutations would have been predicted to decrease the fitness of any virus within which they occurred. We further propose that the mutations in each of the three clusters therefore coperatively interact to both mitigate their individual fitness costs, and, in combination with other mutations, adaptively alter the function of Spike. Given the evident epidemic growth advantages of Omicron over all previously known SARS-CoV-2 lineages, it is crucial to determine both how such complex and highly adaptive mutation constellations were assembled within the Omicron S-gene, and why, despite unprecedented global genomic surveillance efforts, the early stages of this assembly process went completely undetected.

Journal article

Barr DA, Schutz C, Balfour A, Shey M, Kamariza M, Bertozzi CR, de Wet TJ, Dinkele R, Ward A, Haigh KA, Kanyik J-P, Mizrahi V, Nicol MP, Wilkinson RJ, Lalloo DG, Warner DF, Meintjes G, Davies Get al., 2022, Serial measurement of M. tuberculosis in blood from critically-ill patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis, EBioMedicine, Vol: 78, ISSN: 2352-3964

BACKGROUND: Despite being highly prevalent in hospitalised patients with severe HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB) and sepsis, little is known about the mycobacteriology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bloodstream infection (MTBBSI). We developed methods to serially measure bacillary load in blood and used these to characterise MTBBSI response to anti-TB therapy (ATT) and relationship with mortality. METHODS: We established a microscopy method for direct visualisation of M. tuberculosis bacilli in blood using a novel lysis-concentration protocol and the fluorescent probe, 4-N,N-dimethylaminonaphthalimide-trehalose (DMN-Tre). We tested blood using GeneXpert® MTB/RIF-Ultra (Xpert-ultra) and Myco/F lytic culture after processing blood through lysis-wash steps to remove PCR inhibitors and anti-microbial drug carry-over. HIV-positive patients predicted to have MTBBSI gave blood samples 0, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h after ATT initiation. Bacillary loads were quantified using microscopy, Xpert-ultra cycle threshold, and culture time-to-positivity. Pharmacodynamics were modelled using these measures combined on an ordinal scale, including association with 12-week mortality. FINDINGS: M. tuberculosis was detected in 27 of 28 recruited participants; 25 (89%) by blood Xpert-ultra, 22 (79%) by DMN-Tre microscopy, and 21 (75%) by Myco/F lytic blood culture. Eight (29%) participants died by 12-week follow-up. In a combined pharmacodynamic model, predicted probabilities of negative DMN-Tre microscopy, blood Xpert-ultra, or blood culture after 72 h treatment were 0·64, 0·27, and 0·94, respectively, in those who survived, compared with 0·23, 0·06, and 0·71 in those who died (posterior probability of slower clearance of MTBBSI in those that died >0·99). DMN-Tre microscopy of blood demonstrated heterogenous bacillary morphologies, including microcolonies and clumps. Bacillary cell-length varied significantly with ATT exposure (mean

Journal article

Walker TM, Miotto P, Köser CU, Fowler PW, Knaggs J, Iqbal Z, Hunt M, Chindelevitch L, Farhat M, Cirillo DM, Comas I, Posey J, Omar SV, Peto TE, Suresh A, Uplekar S, Laurent S, Colman RE, Nathanson C-M, Zignol M, Walker AS, CRyPTIC Consortium, Seq&Treat Consortium, Crook DW, Ismail N, Rodwell TCet al., 2022, The 2021 WHO catalogue of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex mutations associated with drug resistance: a genotypic analysis., The Lancet Microbe, Vol: 3, Pages: e265-e273, ISSN: 2666-5247

Background: Molecular diagnostics are considered the most promising route to achieving rapid, universal drug susceptibility testing for Mycobacterium tuberculosiscomplex (MTBC). We aimed to generate a WHO endorsed catalogue of mutations to serve as a global standard for interpreting molecular information for drug resistance prediction. Methods: A candidate gene approach was used to identify mutations as associated with resistance, or consistent with susceptibility, for 13 WHO endorsed anti-tuberculosis drugs. 38,215 MTBC isolates with paired whole-genome sequencing and phenotypic drug susceptibility testing data were amassed from 45 countries. For each mutation, a contingency table of binary phenotypes and presence or absence of the mutation computed positive predictive value, and Fisher's exact tests generated odds ratios and Benjamini-Hochberg corrected p-values. Mutations were graded as Associated with Resistance if present in at least 5 isolates, if the odds ratio was >1 with a statistically significant corrected p-value, and if the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval on the positive predictive value for phenotypic resistance was >25%. A series of expert rules were applied for final confidence grading of each mutation. Findings: 15,667 associations were computed for 13,211 unique mutations linked to one or more drugs. 1,149/15,667 (7·3%) mutations were classified as associated with phenotypic resistance and 107/15,667 (0·7%) were deemed consistent with susceptibility. For rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, fluoroquinolones, and streptomycin, the mutations' pooled sensitivity was >80%. Specificity was over 95% for all drugs except ethionamide (91·4%), moxifloxacin (91·6%) and ethambutol (93·3%). Only two resistance mutations were classified for bedaquiline, delamanid, clofazimine, and linezolid as prevalence of phenotypic resistance was low for these drugs. Interpretation: This first WHO endorsed catalogue of mol

Journal article

Keeton R, Tincho MB, Ngomti A, Baguma R, Benede N, Suzuki A, Khan K, Madzorerera SV, Moyo-Gwete T, Mennen M, SKelem S, Adriaanse M, Muthithu D, Aremu O, Stek C, du Bruyn E, Van Der Mescht MA, de Beer Z, de Villiers TR, Bodenstein A, van der Berg G, Mendes A, Strydom A, Venter M, Giandhari J, Naidoo Y, Pillay S, Tegally H, Grifoni A, Weiskopf D, Sette A, Wilkinson RJ, de Oliveira T, Bekker L-G, Gray G, Ueckermann V, Rossouw T, Boswell MT, Bihman F, Moore PL, Ntusi NN, Burgers WA, Riou Cet al., 2022, T cell responses to SARS-1 CoV-2 spike cross-recognize Omicron, Nature, Vol: 603, Pages: 488-492, ISSN: 0028-0836

The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant has multiple Spike (S) protein mutations1,2 that contribute to escape from antibody neutralization3–6 and reduce vaccine protection from infection7,8. The extent to which other components of the adaptive response such as T cells may still target Omicron and contribute to protection from severe outcomes is unknown. We assessed the ability of T cells to react with Omicron spike in participants who were vaccinated with Ad26.CoV2.S, BNT162b2, or unvaccinated convalescent COVID-19 patients (n=70). We found that 70-80% of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response to spike was maintained across study groups. Moreover, the magnitude of Omicron cross-reactive T cells was similar to Beta and Delta variants, despite Omicron harboring considerably more mutations. In Omicron-infected hospitalized patients (n=19), there were comparable T cell responses to ancestral spike, nucleocapsid and membrane proteins to those patients hospitalized in previous waves dominated by the ancestral, Beta or Delta variants (n=49). Thus, despite Omicron’s extensive mutations and reduced susceptibility to neutralizing antibodies, the majority of T cell responses, induced by vaccination or infection, cross-recognize the variant. It remains to be determined whether well-preserved T cell immunity to Omicron contributes to protection from severe COVID-19, and is linked to early clinical observations from South Africa and elsewhere9–12.

Journal article

Middelkoop K, Walker N, Stewart J, Delport C, Joliffe DA, Nuttall J, Coussens AK, Naude CE, Tang JCY, Fraser WD, Wilkinson RJ, Bekker L-G, Martineau ARet al., 2022, Prevalence and determinants of vitamin D deficiency in 1,825 Cape Town primary schoolchildren: a cross-sectional study, Nutrients, Vol: 14, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 2072-6643

Vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D[25(OH)D] <50 nmol/L) is common among adults in Cape Town, South Africa, but studies investigating vitamin D status of children in this setting are lacking. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence and determinants of vitamin D deficiency in 1825 Cape Town schoolchildren aged 6–11 years. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was 7.6% (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 6.5% to 8.9%). Determinants of vitamin D deficiency included month of sampling (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] for July–September vs. January–March 10.69, 95% CI 5.02 to 22.77; aOR for October–December vs. January–March 6.73, 95% CI 2.82 to 16.08), older age (aOR 1.25 per increasing year, 95% CI: 1.01–1.53) and higher body mass index (BMI; aOR 1.24 per unit increase in BMI-for-age Z-score, 95% CI: 1.03–1.49). In a subset of 370 participants in whom parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations were measured; these were inversely related to serum 25(OH)D concentrations (p < 0.001). However, no association between participants with hyperparathyroidism (PTH >6.9 pmol/L) and vitamin D deficiency was seen (p = 0.42). In conclusion, we report that season is the major determinant of vitamin D status among Cape Town primary schoolchildren, with prevalence of vitamin D deficiency ranging from 1.4% in January–March to 22.8% in July–September.

Journal article

Abdelgawad N, Chirehwa M, Schutz C, Barr D, Ward A, Janssen S, Burton R, Wilkinson RJ, Shey M, Wiesner L, McIlleron H, Maartens G, Meintjes G, Denti Pet al., 2022, A comparison of the population pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide between hospitalized and non-hospitalized tuberculosis patients with or without HIV, Wellcome Open Research, Vol: 7, Pages: 72-72

<ns4:p>Background.</ns4:p><ns4:p> Early mortality among hospitalized HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB/HIV) patients is high despite treatment. The pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide were investigated in hospitalized TB/HIV patients and a cohort of outpatients with TB (with or without HIV) to determine whether drug exposures differed between groups.</ns4:p><ns4:p> Methods.</ns4:p><ns4:p> Standard first-line TB treatment was given daily as per national guidelines, which consisted of oral 4-drug fixed-dose combination tablets containing 150 mg rifampicin, 75 mg isoniazid, 400 mg pyrazinamide, and 275 mg ethambutol. Plasma samples were drawn on the 3rd day of treatment over eight hours post-dose. Rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide in plasma were quantified and NONMEM<ns4:sup>®</ns4:sup> was used to analyze the data.</ns4:p><ns4:p> Results.</ns4:p><ns4:p> Data from 60 hospitalized patients (11 of whom died within 12 weeks of starting treatment) and 48 outpatients were available. Median (range) weight and age were 56 (35 - 88) kg, and 37 (19 - 77) years, respectively. Bioavailability and clearance of the three drugs were similar between TB/HIV hospitalized and TB outpatients. However, rifampicin’s absorption was slower in hospitalized patients than in outpatients; mean absorption time was 49.9% and 154% more in hospitalized survivors and hospitalized deaths, respectively, than in outpatients. Higher levels of conjugated bilirubin correlated with lower rifampicin clearance. Isoniazid’s clearance estimates were 25.5 L/h for fast metabolizers and 9.76 L/h for slow metabolizers. Pyrazinamide’s clearance was more variable among hospitalized patients. The variability in clearance among patients  was 1.70 and 3.56 times more for hospitalized survivors and hospitalized deaths, respectively, than outpatients.  </ns4:p><ns4:p> Conclu

Journal article

van den Berg K, Glatt TN, Vermeulen M, Little F, Swanevelder R, Barrett C, Court R, Bremner M, Nyoni C, Swarts A, Mmenu C, Crede T, Kritzinger G, Naude J, Szymanski P, Cowley J, Moyo-Gwete T, Moore PL, Black J, Singh J, Bhiman JN, Baijnath P, Mody P, Malherbe J, Potgieter S, van Vuuren C, Maasdorp S, Wilkinson RJ, Louw VJ, Wasserman Set al., 2022, Convalescent plasma in the treatment of moderate to severe COVID-19 pneumonia: a randomized controlled trial (PROTECT-Patient Trial), Scientific Reports, Vol: 12, ISSN: 2045-2322

Background:There is a need for effective therapy for COVID-19 pneumonia. Convalescent plasma has antiviral activity and early observational studies suggested benefit in reducing COVID-19 severity. We investigated the safety and efficacy of convalescent plasma in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in a population with a high HIV prevalence and where few therapeutic options were available.Methods:We performed a double-blinded, multicenter, randomized controlled trial in one private and three public sector hospitals in South Africa. Adult participants with COVID-19 pneumonia requiring non-invasive oxygenwere randomized 1:1 to receive a single transfusion of 200mL of either convalescent plasma or 0.9% saline solution. The primary outcome measure was hospital discharge and/or improvement of ≥ 2 points on theWorld Health Organisation Blueprint Ordinal Scale for Clinical improvement by day 28 of enrolment. The trialwas stopped early for futility by the Data and Safety Monitoring Board.Results:103 participants, including 21 HIV positive individuals, were randomized at the time of premature trial termination: 52 in the convalescent plasma and 51 in the placebo group. The primary outcome occurred in 31 participants in the convalescent plasma group and and 32 participants in the placebo group (relative risk 1.03 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.38). Two grade 1 transfusion-related adverse events occurred. Participants who improved clinically received convalescent plasma with a higher median anti-SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody titre compared with those who did not (298 versus 205 AU/mL).Conclusions:Our study contributes additional evidence for recommendations against the use of convalescent plasma for COVID-19 pneumonia. Safety and feasibility in this population supports future investigation for otherindications.

Journal article

del Rosario RCH, Poschmann J, Lim C, Cheng CY, Kumar P, Riou C, Ong ST, Gerges S, Hajan HS, Kumar D, Marzuki M, Lu X, Lee A, Wijaya GC, Rayan NA, Zhuang Z, Du Bruyn E, Chee CBE, Lee B, Lum J, Zolezzi F, Poidinger M, Rotzschke O, Khor CC, Wilkinson RJ, Wang YT, Chandy GK, De Libero G, Singhal A, Prabhakar Set al., 2022, Histone acetylome-wide associations in immune cells from individuals with active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, NATURE MICROBIOLOGY, Vol: 7, Pages: 312-+, ISSN: 2058-5276

Journal article

Davies M-A, Kassanjee R, Rosseau P, Morden E, Johnson L, Solomon W, Hsiao N-Y, Hussey H, Meintjes G, Paleker M, Jacobs T, Raubenheimer P, Heekes A, Dane P, Bam J-L, Smith M, Preiser W, Pienaar D, Mendelson M, Naude J, Schrueder N, Mnguni A, Roux SL, Murie K, Prozesky H, Mahomed H, Rossouw L, Wasserman S, Maughan D, Boloko L, Smith B, Taljaard J, Symons G, Ntusi N, Parker A, Wolter N, Jassat W, Cohen C, Lessells R, Wilkinson RJ, Arendse J, Kariem S, Moodley M, Vallabhjee K, Wolmarans M, Cloete K, Boulle Aet al., 2022, Outcomes of laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in the Omicron-driven fourth wave compared with previous waves in the Western Cape Province, South Africa., Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to compare COVID-19 outcomes in the Omicron-driven fourth wave with prior waves in the Western Cape, the contribution of undiagnosed prior infection to differences in outcomes in a context of high seroprevalence due to prior infection, and whether protection against severe disease conferred by prior infection and/or vaccination was maintained. METHODS: In this cohort study, we included public sector patients aged ≥20 years with a laboratory confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis between 14 November-11 December 2021 (wave four) and equivalent prior wave periods. We compared the risk between waves of the following outcomes using Cox regression: death, severe hospitalization or death and any hospitalization or death (all ≤14 days after diagnosis) adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, geography, vaccination and prior infection. RESULTS: We included 5,144 patients from wave four and 11,609 from prior waves. Risk of all outcomes was lower in wave four compared to the Delta-driven wave three (adjusted Hazard Ratio (aHR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] for death 0.27 [0.19; 0.38]. Risk reduction was lower when adjusting for vaccination and prior diagnosed infection (aHR:0.41, 95% CI: 0.29; 0.59) and reduced further when accounting for unascertained prior infections (aHR: 0.72). Vaccine protection was maintained in wave four (aHR for outcome of death: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.10; 0.58). CONCLUSIONS: In the Omicron-driven wave, severe COVID-19 outcomes were reduced mostly due to protection conferred by prior infection and/or vaccination, but intrinsically reduced virulence may account for an approximately 25% reduced risk of severe hospitalization or death compared to Delta.

Working paper

Blumenthal MJ, Lambarey H, Chetram A, Riou C, Wilkinson RJ, Schaefer Get al., 2022, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus, but not Epstein-Barr virus, Co-infection associates with coronavirus disease 2019 severity and outcome in South African patients, Frontiers in Microbiology, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1664-302X

In South Africa, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is occurring against the backdrop of high Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), tuberculosis and non-communicable disease burdens as well as prevalent herpesviruses infections such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). As part of an observational study of adults admitted to Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa during the period June–August 2020 and assessed for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, we measured KSHV serology and KSHV and EBV viral load (VL) in peripheral blood in relation to COVID-19 severity and outcome. A total of 104 patients with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were included in this study. 61% were men and 39% women with a median age of 53 years (range 21–86). 29.8% (95% CI: 21.7–39.1%) of the cohort was HIV positive and 41.1% (95% CI: 31.6–51.1%) were KSHV seropositive. EBV VL was detectable in 84.4% (95% CI: 76.1–84.4%) of the cohort while KSHV DNA was detected in 20.6% (95% CI: 13.6–29.2%), with dual EBV/KSHV infection in 17.7% (95% CI: 11.1–26.2%). On enrollment, 48 [46.2% (95% CI: 36.8–55.7%)] COVID-19 patients were classified as severe on the WHO ordinal scale reflecting oxygen therapy and supportive care requirements and 30 of these patients [28.8% (95% CI: 20.8–38.0%)] later died. In COVID-19 patients, detectable KSHV VL was associated with death after adjusting for age, sex, HIV status and detectable EBV VL [p = 0.036, adjusted OR = 3.17 (95% CI: 1.08–9.32)]. Furthermore, in HIV negative COVID-19 patients, there was a trend indicating that KSHV VL may be related to COVID-19 disease severity [p = 0.054, unstandardized co-efficient 0.86 (95% CI: –0.015–1.74)] in addition to death [p = 0.008, adjusted OR = 7.34 (95% CI: 1.69–31.49)]. While the design of our study cannot distinguish if disease synergy exists

Journal article

Riou C, Schafer G, du Bruyn E, Goliath RT, Stek C, Mou H, Hung D, Wilkinson KA, Wilkinson Ret al., 2022, Rapid, simplified whole blood-based multiparameter assay to quantify and phenotype SARS-CoV-2 specific T cells, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 59, ISSN: 0903-1936

Rapid tests to evaluate SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell responses are urgently needed to decipher protective immunity and aid monitoring vaccine-induced immunity. Using a rapid whole blood assay requiring minimal amount of blood, we measured qualitatively and quantitatively SARS-38CoV-2-specific CD4 T cell responses in 31 healthcare workers, using flow cytometry. 100% of COVID-19 convalescent participants displayed a detectable SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4 T cell response. SARS-CoV-2-responding cells were also detected in 40.9% of participants with no COVID-19-associated symptoms or who tested PCR negative. Phenotypic assessment indicated that, in COVID-19 convalescent participants, SARS-CoV-2 CD4 responses displayed an early differentiated memory phenotype with limited capacity to produce IFNɣ. Conversely, in participants with no reported symptoms, SARS-CoV-2 CD4 responses were enriched in late differentiated cells, co-expressing IFNɣ and TNFα and also Granzyme B. This proof-of-concept study presents a scalable alternative to PBMC-based assays to enumerate and phenotype SARS-CoV-2-responding T cells, thus representing a practical tool to monitor adaptive immunity due to natural infection or vaccine trials.

Journal article

Burke RM, Rickman HM, Singh V, Kalua T, Labhardt N, Hosseinipour M, Wilkinson RJ, MacPherson Pet al., 2022, Same-day antiretroviral therapy initiation in people living with HIV who have tuberculosis symptoms: a systematic review, HIV Medicine, Vol: 23, Pages: 4-15, ISSN: 1464-2662

ObjectivesTuberculosis symptoms are very common among people living with HIV (PLHIV) initiatingantiretroviral therapy (ART), are not specific for tuberculosis disease and may result indelayed ART start. The risks and benefits of same-day ART initiation in PLHIV with tuberculosissymptoms are unknown.MethodsWe systematically reviewed nine databases on 12 March 2020 to identify studies thatinvestigated same-day ART initiation among PLHIV with tuberculosis symptoms and reportedboth their approach to TB screening and clinical outcomes. We extracted and summariseddata about TB screening, numbers of people starting same-day ART and outcomes.ResultsWe included four studies. Two studies deferred ART for everyone with any tuberculosissymptoms (one or more of cough, fever, night sweats or weight loss) and substantial numbersof people had deferred ART start (28% and 39% did not start same-day ART). Two studiespermitted some people with tuberculosis symptoms to start same-day ART, and fewer peopledeferred ART (2% and 16% did not start same-day). Two of the four studies were conductedsequentially; proven viral load suppression at eight months was 31% when everyone withtuberculosis symptoms had ART deferred, and 44% when algorithm was changed so thatsome people with tuberculosis symptoms could start same-day ART.ConclusionsAlthough tuberculosissymptoms are very common in people starting ART, there is insufficientevidence about whether presence of tuberculosis symptoms should lead to ART start beingdeferred or not. Research to inform clear guidelines would help maximise benefits of sameday ART.

Journal article

Fendler A, Shepherd STC, Au L, Wilkinson KA, Wu M, Schmitt AM, Tippu Z, Farag S, Rogiers A, Harvey R, Carlyle E, Edmonds K, Del Rosario L, Lingard K, Mangwende M, Holt L, Ahmod H, Korteweg J, Foley T, Barber T, Emslie-Henry A, Caulfield-Lynch N, Byrne F, Shum B, Gerard CL, Deng D, Kjaer S, Song O-R, Queval C, Kavanagh C, Wall EC, Carr EJ, Namjou S, Caidan S, Gavrielides M, MacRae JI, Kelly G, Peat K, Kelly D, Murra A, Kelly K, O'Flaherty M, Shea RL, Gardner G, Murray D, Yousaf N, Jhanji S, Van As N, Young K, Furness AJS, Pickering L, Beale R, Swanton C, Crick COVID19 consortium, Gandhi S, Gamblin S, Bauer DLV, Kassiotis G, Howell M, Nicholson E, Walker S, Wilkinson RJ, Larkin J, Turajlic S, CAPTURE consortiumet al., 2021, Immune responses following third COVID-19 vaccination are reduced in patients with hematological malignancies compared to patients with solid cancer., Cancer Cell, ISSN: 1535-6108

Journal article

Coppolla M, Lai R, Wilkinson RJ, Ottenhoff THMet al., 2021, The in vivo transcriptomic blueprint of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lung, Frontiers in Immunology, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1664-3224

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genes encoding proteins targeted by vaccines and drugs should be expressed in the lung, the main organ affected by Mtb, for these to be effective. However, the pulmonary expression of most Mtb genes and their proteins remains poorly characterized. The aim of this study is to fill this knowledge gap. We analysed large scale transcriptomic datasets from specimens of Mtb-infected humans, TB-hypersusceptible (C3H/FeJ) and TB-resistant (C57BL/6J) mice and compared data to in vitro cultured Mtb gene-expression profiles. Results revealed high concordance in the most abundantly in vivo expressed genes between pulmonary Mtb transcriptomes from different datasets and different species. As expected, this contrasted with a lower correlation found with the highest expressed Mtb genes from in vitro datasets. Among the most consistently and highly in vivo expressed genes, 35 have not yet been explored as targets for vaccination or treatment. More than half of these genes are involved in protein synthesis or metabolic pathways. This first lung-oriented multi-study analysis of the in vivo expressed Mtb-transcriptome provides essential data that considerably increase our understanding of pulmonary TB infection biology, and identifies novel molecules for target-based TB-vaccine and drug development.

Journal article

Riou C, Keeton R, Moyo-Gwete T, Hermanus T, Kgagudi P, Baguma R, Valley-Omar Z, Smith M, Tegally H, Doolabh D, Iranzadeh A, Tyers L, Mutavhatsindi H, Tincho MB, Benede N, Marais G, Chinhoyi LR, Mennen M, Skelem S, du Bruyn E, Stek C, de Oliveira T, Williamson C, Moore PL, Wilkinson RJ, Ntusi N, Burgers WAet al., 2021, Escape from recognition of SARS-CoV-2 Beta variant spike epitopes but overall preservation of T cell immunity, Science Translational Medicine, Vol: 14, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1946-6234

SARS-CoV-2 variants have emerged that escape neutralization and potentially impact vaccine efficacy. T cell responses play a role in protection from reinfection and severe disease, but the potential for spike mutations to affect T cell immunity is incompletely understood. We assessed neutralizing antibody and T cell responses in 44 South African COVID-19 patients infected either with the Beta variant (dominant from November 2020 to May 2021) or infected prior to its emergence (first wave, Wuhan strain), to provide an overall measure of immune evasion. We show that robust spike-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses were detectable in Beta-infected patients, similar to first wave patients. Using peptides spanning the Beta-mutated regions, we identified CD4 T cell responses targeting the wild type peptides in 12/22 first wave patients, all of whom failed to recognize corresponding Beta-mutated peptides. However, responses to mutated regions formed only a small proportion (15.7%) of the overall CD4 response, and few patients (3/44) mounted CD8 responses that targeted the mutated regions. Among the spike epitopes tested, we identified three epitopes containing the D215, L18, or D80 residues that were specifically recognized by CD4 T cells, and their mutated versions were associated with a loss of response. This study shows that in spite of loss of recognition of immunogenic CD4 epitopes, CD4 and CD8 T cell responses to Beta are preserved overall. These observations may explain why several vaccines have retained the ability to protect against severe COVID-19 even with substantial loss of neutralizing antibody activity against Beta.

Journal article

Lai RP-J, Cortes T, Marais S, Rockwood N, Burke M, Garza-Garcia A, Horswell S, Sesay AK, O'Garra A, Young DB, Wilkinson RJet al., 2021, Transcriptomic characterization of tuberculous sputum reveals a host Warburg effect and microbial cholesterol catabolism, mBio, Vol: 12, ISSN: 2150-7511

The crucial transmission phase of tuberculosis (TB) relies on infectious sputum and yet cannot easily be modeled. We applied one-step RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to sputum from infectious TB patients to investigate the host and microbial environments underlying transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In such TB sputa, compared to non-TB controls, transcriptional upregulation of inflammatory responses, including an interferon-driven proinflammatory response and a metabolic shift toward glycolysis, was observed in the host. Among all bacterial sequences in the sputum, approximately 1.5% originated from M. tuberculosis, and its transcript abundance was lower in HIV-1-coinfected patients. Commensal bacterial abundance was reduced in the presence of M. tuberculosis infection. Direct alignment to the genomes of the predominant microbiota species also reveals differential adaptation, whereby firmicutes (e.g., streptococci) displayed a nonreplicating phenotype with reduced transcription of ribosomal proteins and reduced activities of ATP synthases, while Neisseria and Prevotella spp. were less affected. The transcriptome of sputum M. tuberculosis more closely resembled aerobic replication and shared similarity in carbon metabolism to in vitro and in vivo models with significant upregulation of genes associated with cholesterol metabolism and downstream propionate detoxification pathways. In addition, and counter to previous reports on intracellular M. tuberculosis infection in vitro, M. tuberculosis in sputum was zinc, but not iron, deprived, and the phoP loci were also significantly downregulated, suggesting that the pathogen is likely extracellular in location.IMPORTANCE Although a few studies have described the microbiome composition of TB sputa based on 16S ribosomal DNA, these studies did not compare to non-TB samples and the nature of the method does not allow any functional inference. This is the first study to apply such technology using clinical specimens and obta

Journal article

Blumenthal MJ, Lambarey H, Chetram A, Riou C, Wilkinson RJ, Schafer Get al., 2021, KSHV, but not EBV, co-infection associates with COVID-19 severity and outcome in South African patients, Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN: 1664-302X

In South Africa, the COVID-19 pandemic occurs against the backdrop of high Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1), tuberculosis (TB)and non-communicable disease burdens as well as prevalent herpesviruses infections such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi’ssarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). As part of an observational study of adults admitted to Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town,South Africa, during the period June – August 2020 and assessed for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)infection, we measured KSHV serology and KSHV and EBV viral load (VL) in peripheral blood in relation to Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) severity and outcome. A total of 104 patients with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were included. 61% were men and39% women with a median age of 53 years (range 21 – 86). 29.8% (95% CI: 21.7 – 39.1%) of the cohort was HIV-1 positive and 41.1%(95% CI: 31.6 – 51.1%) were KSHV seropositive. EBV VL was detectable in 84.4% (95% CI: 76.1 – 84.4%) of the cohort while KSHV DNAwas detected in 20.6% (95% CI: 13.6 – 29.2%), with dual EBV/KSHV infection in 17.7% (95% CI: 11.1 – 26.2%). On enrolment, 48 (46.2%(95% CI: 36.8 – 55.7%)) COVID-19 patients were classified as severe on the WHO ordinal scale reflecting oxygen therapy andsupportive care requirements; 30 of these patients (28.8% (95% CI: 20.8 – 38.0%) died. In COVID-19 patients, detectable KSHV VL wasassociated with death after adjusting for age, sex, HIV-1 status and detectable EBV VL (p=0.036, adjusted OR=3.17 [95% CI: 1.08 –9.32]). Furthermore, in HIV-1 negative COVID-19 patients, there was a trend indicating that KSHV VL was related to COVID-19disease severity (p=0.054, unstandardized co-efficient 0.86 [95% CI: -0.015 – 1.74]) in addition to death (p=0.008, adjusted OR=7.34[95% CI: 1.69 – 31.49]). While the design of our study cannot distinguish if disease synergy exists between COVID-19 and KSHV

Journal article

Fendler A, Shepherd STC, Au L, Wilkinson KA, Wu M, Byrne F, Cerrone M, Schmitt AM, Joharatnam-Hogan N, Shum B, Tippu Z, Rzeniewicz K, Boos LA, Harvey R, Carlyle E, Edmonds K, Del Rosario L, Sarker S, Lingard K, Mangwende M, Holt L, Ahmod H, Korteweg J, Foley T, Bazin J, Gordon W, Barber T, Emslie-Henry A, Xie W, Gerard CL, Deng D, Wall EC, Agua-Doce A, Namjou S, Caidan S, Gavrielides M, MacRae J, Kelly G, Peat K, Kelly D, Murra A, Kelly K, O'Flaherty M, Dowdie L, Ash N, Gronthoud F, Shea RL, Gardner G, Murray D, Kinnaird F, Cui W, Pascual J, Rodney S, Mencel J, Curtis O, Stephenson C, Robinson A, Oza B, Farag S, Leslie I, Rogiers A, Iyengar S, Ethell M, Messiou C, Cunningham D, Chau I, Starling N, Turner N, Welsh L, van As N, Jones RL, Droney J, Banerjee S, Tatham KC, O'Brien M, Harrington K, Bhide S, Okines A, Reid A, Young K, Furness AJS, Pickering L, Swanton C, Gandhi S, Gamblin S, Bauer DL, Kassiotis G, Kumar S, Yousaf N, Jhanji S, Nicholson E, Howell M, Walker S, Wilkinson RJ, Larkin J, Turajlic Set al., 2021, Adaptive immunity and neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern following vaccination in patients with cancer: the CAPTURE study, Nature Cancer, Vol: 2, Pages: 1305-1320, ISSN: 2662-1347

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) antiviral response in a pan-tumor immune monitoring (CAPTURE) (NCT03226886) is a prospective cohort study of COVID-19 immunity in patients with cancer. Here we evaluated 585 patients following administration of two doses of BNT162b2 or AZD1222 vaccines, administered 12 weeks apart. Seroconversion rates after two doses were 85% and 59% in patients with solid and hematological malignancies, respectively. A lower proportion of patients had detectable titers of neutralizing antibodies (NAbT) against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern (VOC) versus wild-type (WT) SARS-CoV-2. Patients with hematological malignancies were more likely to have undetectable NAbT and had lower median NAbT than those with solid cancers against both SARS-CoV-2 WT and VOC. By comparison with individuals without cancer, patients with hematological, but not solid, malignancies had reduced neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses. Seroconversion showed poor concordance with NAbT against VOC. Previous SARS-CoV-2 infection boosted the NAb response including against VOC, and anti-CD20 treatment was associated with undetectable NAbT. Vaccine-induced T cell responses were detected in 80% of patients and were comparable between vaccines or cancer types. Our results have implications for the management of patients with cancer during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Journal article

Fendler A, Au L, Shepherd STC, Byrne F, Cerrone M, Boos LA, Rzeniewicz K, Gordon W, Shum B, Gerard CL, Ward B, Xie W, Schmitt AM, Joharatnam-Hogan N, Cornish GH, Pule M, Mekkaoui L, Ng KW, Carlyle E, Edmonds K, Del Rosario L, Sarker S, Lingard K, Mangwende M, Holt L, Ahmod H, Stone R, Gomes C, Flynn HR, Agua-Doce A, Hobson P, Caidan S, Howell M, Wu M, Goldstone R, Crawford M, Cubitt L, Patel H, Gavrielides M, Nye E, Snijders AP, MacRae J, Nicod J, Gronthoud F, Shea RL, Messiou C, Cunningham D, Chau I, Starling N, Turner N, Welsh L, van As N, Jones RL, Droney J, Banerjee S, Tatham KC, Jhanji S, O'Brien M, Curtis O, Harrington K, Bhide S, Bazin J, Robinson A, Stephenson C, Slattery T, Khan Y, Tippu Z, Leslie I, Gennatas S, Okines A, Reid A, Young K, Furness AJS, Pickering L, Gandhi S, Gamblin S, Swanton C, Nicholson E, Kumar S, Yousaf N, Wilkinson KA, Swerdlow A, Harvey R, Kassiotis G, Larkin J, Wilkinson RJ, Turajlic Set al., 2021, Functional antibody and T cell immunity following SARS-CoV-2 infection, including by variants of concern, in patients with cancer: the CAPTURE study, Nature Cancer, Vol: 2, Pages: 1321-1337, ISSN: 2662-1347

Patients with cancer have higher COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. Here we present the prospective CAPTURE study, integrating longitudinal immune profiling with clinical annotation. Of 357 patients with cancer, 118 were SARS-CoV-2 positive, 94 were symptomatic and 2 died of COVID-19. In this cohort, 83% patients had S1-reactive antibodies and 82% had neutralizing antibodies against wild type SARS-CoV-2, whereas neutralizing antibody titers against the Alpha, Beta and Delta variants were substantially reduced. S1-reactive antibody levels decreased in 13% of patients, whereas neutralizing antibody titers remained stable for up to 329 days. Patients also had detectable SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells and CD4+ responses correlating with S1-reactive antibody levels, although patients with hematological malignancies had impaired immune responses that were disease and treatment specific, but presented compensatory cellular responses, further supported by clinical recovery in all but one patient. Overall, these findings advance the understanding of the nature and duration of the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 in patients with cancer.

Journal article

Bohrer AC, Castro E, Hu Z, Queiroz ATL, Tocheny CE, Assmann M, Sakai S, Nelson C, Baker PJ, Ma H, Wang L, Zilu W, du Bruyn E, Riou C, Kauffman KD, Moore IN, Del Nonno F, Petrone L, Goletti D, Martineau AR, Lowe DM, Cronan MR, Wilkinson RJ, Barry CE, Via LE, Barber DL, Klion AD, Andrade BB, Song Y, Wong K-W, Mayer-Barber KDet al., 2021, Eosinophils are part of the granulocyte response in tuberculosis and promote host resistance in mice, JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE, Vol: 218, ISSN: 0022-1007

Journal article

Chen RY, Yu X, Smith B, Liu X, Gao J, Diacon AH, Dawson R, Tameris M, Zhu H, Qu Y, Zhang R, Pan S, Jin X, Goldfeder LC, Cai Y, Arora K, Wang J, Vincent J, Malherbe S, Thienemann F, Wilkinson RJ, Walzl G, Barry CEet al., 2021, Radiological and functional evidence of the bronchial spread of tuberculosis: an observational analysis, The Lancet Microbe, Vol: 2, Pages: E518-E526, ISSN: 2666-5247

BackgroundDirect bronchial spread of tuberculosis was extensively described in pre-antibiotic human pathology literature but this description has been overlooked in the post-antibiotic era, in which most pathology data come from animal models that emphasise the granuloma. Modern techniques, such as [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET-CT scans, might provide further insight. Our aim was to understand normal early tuberculosis resolution patterns on pulmonary PET-CT scans in treated patients with tuberculosis who were subsequently cured.MethodsIn this observational analysis, we analysed data from PredictTB, an ongoing, prospective, randomised clinical trial that examined sequential baseline and week 4 FDG-PET-CT scans from participants successfully treated (sputum culture negative 18 months after enrolment) for drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis in South Africa and China. Participants who were aged 18–75 years, GeneXpert MTB/RIF positive for tuberculosis and negative for rifampicin resistance, had not yet started tuberculosis treatment, had not been treated for active tuberculosis within the previous 3 years, and met basic safety laboratory criteria were included and participants with diabetes, HIV infection, or with extrapulmonary tuberculosis including pleural tuberculosis were excluded. Scans were assessed by two readers for the location of tuberculosis lesions (eg, cavities and consolidations), bronchial thickening patterns, and changes from baseline to week 4 of treatment.FindingsAmong the first 124 participants (enrolled from June 22, 2017, to Sept 27, 2018) who were successfully treated, 161 primarily apical cavitary lesions were identified at baseline. Bronchial thickening and inflammation linking non-cavitary consolidative lesions to cavities were observed in 121 (98%) of 124 participants' baseline PET-CT scans. After 4 weeks of treatment, 21 (17%) of 124 participants had new or expanding lesions linked to cavities via bronchial inflammation

Journal article

Barr DA, Omollo C, Mason M, Koch A, Wilkinson RJ, Lalloo D, Meintjes GA, Mizrahi V, Warner D, Davies Get al., 2021, Flow cytometry method for absolute counting and single-cell phenotyping of mycobacteria, Scientific Reports, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-17, ISSN: 2045-2322

Detection and accurate quantitation of viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis is fundamental to understanding mycobacterial pathogenicity, tuberculosis (TB) disease progression and outcomes; TB transmission; drug action, efficacy and drug resistance. Despite this importance, methods for determining numbers of viable bacilli are limited in accuracy and precision owing to inherent characteristics of mycobacterial cell biology – including the tendency to clump, and “differential” culturability – and technical challenges consequent on handling an infectious pathogen under biosafe conditions. We developed an absolute counting method for mycobacteria in liquid cultures using a bench-top flow cytometer, and the low-cost fluorescent dyes Calcein-AM (CA) and SYBR-gold (SG). During exponential growth CA+ cell counts are highly correlated with CFU counts and can be used as a real-time alternative to simplify the accurate standardisation of inocula for experiments. In contrast to CFU counting, this method can detect and enumerate cell aggregates in samples, which we show are a potential source of variance and bias when using established methods. We show that CFUs comprise a sub-population of intact, metabolically active mycobacterial cells in liquid cultures, with CFU proportion varying by growth conditions. A pharmacodynamic application of the flow cytometry method, exploring kinetics of fluorescent probe defined subpopulations compared to CFU is demonstrated. Flow cytometry derived Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) time-kill curves differ for rifampicin and kanamycin versus isoniazid and ethambutol, as do the relative dynamics of discrete morphologically-distinct subpopulations of bacilli revealed by this high-throughput single-cell technique.

Journal article

Roy HA, Cascini N, Ajay B, Mukherjee S, MCGAVIN L, Inman A, Martin AJ, Wilkinson RJ, Whitfield PCet al., 2021, Intracranial tuberculoma and the challenges of global neurosurgery, Advances in Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, ISSN: 1473-9348

In a world of increasing globalisation, neurosurgeons need to be able to diagnose and treat neurosurgical conditions which may not be common to the local population. To illustrate this, we describe the case of an intracranial tuberculoma presenting in the post-partum period. Tuberculosis (TB) is a widely recognised mimic of other conditions, including high grade gliomas, which can result in diagnostic delays.We highlight clinical features that should increase the index of suspicion for TB and create a low threshold fortrial of empirical treatment. We also discuss educational partnership strategies that may help facilitate global perspectives in neurosurgical training.

Journal article

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