Imperial College London

DrRobinLamboll

Faculty of Natural SciencesThe Grantham Institute for Climate Change

Research Associate in Climate Science and Policy
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

r.lamboll

 
 
//

Location

 

Sherfield BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

19 results found

Jones CD, Hickman JE, Rumbold ST, Walton J, Lamboll RD, Skeie RB, Fiedler S, Forster PM, Rogelj J, Abe M, Botzet M, Calvin K, Cassou C, Cole JNS, Davini P, Deushi M, Dix M, Fyfe JC, Gillett NP, Ilyina T, Kawamiya M, Kelley M, Kharin S, Koshiro T, Li H, Mackallah C, Müller WA, Nabat P, van Noije T, Nolan P, Ohgaito R, Olivié D, Oshima N, Parodi J, Reerink TJ, Ren L, Romanou A, Séférian R, Tang Y, Timmreck C, Tjiputra J, Tourigny E, Tsigaridis K, Wang H, Wu M, Wyser K, Yang S, Yang Y, Ziehn Tet al., 2021, The Climate Response to Emissions Reductions Due to COVID‐19: Initial Results From CovidMIP, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol: 48, ISSN: 0094-8276

Journal article

Gettelman A, Lamboll R, Bardeen CG, Forster PM, Watson-Parris Det al., 2021, Climate Impacts of COVID-19 Induced Emission Changes, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol: 48, ISSN: 0094-8276

The COVID-19 pandemic led to dramatic changes in economic activity in 2020. We use estimates of emission changes for 2020 in two Earth System Models (ESMs) to simulate the impacts of the COVID-19 economic changes. Ensembles of nudged simulations are used to separate small signals from meteorological variability. Reductions in aerosol and precursor emissions, chiefly black carbon and sulfate (SO ), led to reductions in total anthropogenic aerosol cooling through aerosol-cloud interactions. The average overall Effective Radiative Forcing (ERF) peaks at +0.29 ± 0.15 Wm in spring 2020. Changes in cloud properties are smaller than observed changes during 2020. Impacts of these changes on regional land surface temperature range up to +0.3 K. The peak impact of these aerosol changes on global surface temperature is very small (+0.03 K). However, the aerosol changes are the largest contribution to radiative forcing and temperature changes as a result of COVID-19 affected emissions, larger than ozone, CO and contrail effects. 4 2 −2

Journal article

Lamboll RD, Nicholls ZRJ, Kikstra JS, Meinshausen M, Rogelj Jet al., 2020, Silicone v1.0.0: an open-source Python package for inferring missing emissions data for climate change research, GEOSCIENTIFIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 13, Pages: 5259-5275, ISSN: 1991-959X

Journal article

Lamboll R, 2020, GranthamImperial/silicone_examples

Contains examples of using the Silicone infiller to complete IAMC data. Details of the Silicone structure are available at https://github.com/GranthamImperial/silicone.

Software

Forster PM, Forster HI, Evans MJ, Gidden MJ, Jones CD, Keller CA, Lamboll RD, Quere CL, Rogelj J, Rosen D, Schleussner C-F, Richardson TB, Smith CJ, Turnock STet al., 2020, Current and future global climate impacts resulting from COVID-19 (vol 82, pg 613, 2020), Nature Climate Change, Vol: 10, Pages: 971-971, ISSN: 1758-678X

Journal article

Forster PM, Forster HI, Evans MJ, Gidden MJ, Jones CD, Keller CA, Lamboll RD, Quere CL, Rogelj J, Rosen D, Schleussner C-F, Richardson TB, Smith CJ, Turnock STet al., 2020, Current and future global climate impacts resulting from COVID-19, Nature Climate Change, Vol: 10, Pages: 913-919, ISSN: 1758-678X

The global response to the COVID-19 pandemic has led to a sudden reduction of both GHG emissions and air pollutants. Here, using national mobility data, we estimate global emission reductions for ten species during the period February to June 2020. We estimate that global NOx emissions declined by as much as 30% in April, contributing a short-term cooling since the start of the year. This cooling trend is offset by ~20% reduction in global SO2 emissions that weakens the aerosol cooling effect, causing short-term warming. As a result, we estimate that the direct effect of the pandemic-driven response will be negligible, with a cooling of around 0.01 ± 0.005 °C by 2030 compared to a baseline scenario that follows current national policies. In contrast, with an economic recovery tilted towards green stimulus and reductions in fossil fuel investments, it is possible to avoid future warming of 0.3 °C by 2050.

Journal article

Tainter GD, Horantner MT, Pazos-Outon LM, Lamboll RD, Abolins H, Leijtens T, Mahesh S, Friend RH, Snaith HJ, Joyce HJ, Deschler Fet al., 2019, Long-Range Charge Extraction in Back-Contact Perovskite Architectures via Suppressed Recombination, JOULE, Vol: 3, Pages: 1301-1313, ISSN: 2542-4351

Journal article

Zhao B, Bai S, Kim V, Lamboll R, Shivanna R, Auras F, Richter JM, Yang L, Dai L, Alsari M, She X-J, Liang L, Zhang J, Lilliu S, Gao P, Snaith HJ, Wang J, Greenham NC, Friend RH, Di Det al., 2018, High-efficiency perovskite-polymer bulk heterostructure light-emitting diodes, NATURE PHOTONICS, Vol: 12, Pages: 783-+, ISSN: 1749-4885

Journal article

Xing Z, Caciagli A, Cao T, Stoev I, Zupkauskas M, O'Neill T, Wenzel T, Lamboll R, Liu D, Eiser Eet al., 2018, Microrheology of DNA hydrogels, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Vol: 115, Pages: 8137-8142, ISSN: 0027-8424

Journal article

Lamboll RD, Greenham NC, 2017, Reduced dimensionality in drift-diffusion models of back-contact solar cells and scanning photocurrent microscopy, JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSICS, Vol: 122, ISSN: 0021-8979

Journal article

Burelbach J, Zupkauskas M, Lamboll R, Lan Y, Eiser Eet al., 2017, Colloidal motion under the action of a thermophoretic force, JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS, Vol: 147, ISSN: 0021-9606

Journal article

Venugopalan V, Lamboll R, Joshi D, Narayan KSet al., 2017, Facile Fabrication of Ultra-Stretchable Metallic Nanocluster Films for Wearable Electronics, ACS APPLIED MATERIALS & INTERFACES, Vol: 9, Pages: 28010-28018, ISSN: 1944-8244

Journal article

Davis NJLK, de la Pena FJ, Tabachnyk M, Richter JM, Lamboll RD, Booker EP, Rivarola FWR, Griffiths JT, Ducati C, Menke SM, Deschler F, Greenham NCet al., 2017, Photon Reabsorption in Mixed CsPbCl3:CsPbl(3) Perovskite Nanocrystal Films for Light-Emitting Diodes, JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY C, Vol: 121, Pages: 3790-3796, ISSN: 1932-7447

Journal article

Pazos L, Szummilo M, Lamboll R, Richter JM, Crespo-Quesada M, Abdi-Jalebi M, Beeson HJ, Vrucinic M, Alsari M, Snaith HJ, Ehrler B, Friend RH, Deschler Fet al., 2016, Photon recycling in Lead-Iodide Perovskite solar cells(Conference Presentation), Next Generation Technologies for Solar Energy Conversion VII, Publisher: SPIE

Conference paper

Pazos-Outon LM, Szumilo M, Lamboll R, Richter JM, Crespo-Quesada M, Abdi-Jalebi M, Beeson HJ, Vrucinic M, Alsari M, Snaith HJ, Ehrler B, Friend RH, Deschler Fet al., 2016, Photon recycling in lead iodide perovskite solar cells, SCIENCE, Vol: 351, Pages: 1430-1433, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Martyushenko N, Bell NAW, Lamboll RD, Keyser UFet al., 2015, Nanopore analysis of amyloid fibrils formed by lysozyme aggregation, ANALYST, Vol: 140, Pages: 4882-4886, ISSN: 0003-2654

Journal article

Lamboll R, Forster P, Jones C, Skeie R, Fiedler S, Samset B, Rogelj Jet al., Modifying emissions data and projections to incorporate the effects of lockdown in climate modelling

<jats:p>&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;Lockdowns to avoid the spread of COVID-19 have created an unprecedented reduction in human emissions, however emissions estimates are typically only available after one or more years, making it hard to incorporate these reductions into emissions projections. In this talk we will outline how mobility data and power usage can nowcast country-and-sector emissions of various gases. In this way we show that the short-term impact of lockdown on emissions data is not expected to be significant for long-term temperature trends.&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;We will also outline how different recovery pathways can be made using basic longer-term emissions projections and how to construct detailed scenarios for non-CO2 emissions, using assumptions about the effects of lockdown on nationally determined contributions and a new software package called Silicone that can infill missing greenhouse gas emissions. Silicone allows the consistent incorporation of tradeoffs between emission species as modelled by IAMs, and as expressed in available greenhouse gas emission scenarios, to be applied to the proposed pathways. We will then show how to make these projections into the more detailed, gridded, CMIP-6 compatible emissions estimates that are required to run General Circulation Models (GCM).&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;</jats:p>

Journal article

Lamboll RD, Nicholls ZRJ, Kikstra JS, Meinshausen M, Rogelj Jet al., Silicone v1.0.0: an open-source Python package for inferring missing emissions data for climate change research

<jats:p>Abstract. Integrated assessment models (IAMs) project future anthropogenic emissions for input into climate models. However, the full list of climate-relevant emissions is lengthy and most IAMs do not model all of them. Here we present silicone, an open-source Python package which infers anthropogenic emissions of missing species based on other known emissions. For example, it can infer nitrous oxide emissions in one scenario based on carbon dioxide emissions from that scenario plus the relationship between nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions in other scenarios. This broadens the range of IAMs available for exploring projections of future climate change. Silicone forms part of the open-source pipeline for assessments of the climate implications of IAMs by the IAM consortium (IAMC). A variety of infilling options are outlined and their suitability for different cases are discussed. The code and notebooks explaining details of the package and how to use it are available from the GitHub repository, https://github.com/GranthamImperial/silicone. There is an additional repository showing uses of the code to complement existing research at https://github.com/GranthamImperial/silicone_examples. </jats:p>

Journal article

Gidden M, Nicholls Z, Byers E, Ganti G, Kikstra J, Lamboll R, Meinshausen M, Riahi K, Rogelj Jet al., Climate assessment of emissions scenarios for use in WG3 of the IPCC&#8217;s Sixth Assessment Report

<jats:p> &amp;lt;p&amp;gt;Consistent and comparable climate assessments of scenarios are critical within the context of IPCC assessment reports. Given the number of scenarios assessed by WG3, the assessment &amp;amp;#8220;pipeline&amp;amp;#8221; must be almost completely automated. Here, we present the application of a new assessment pipeline which combines state-of-the-art components into a single workflow in order to derive climate outcomes for integrated assessment model (IAM) scenarios assessed by WG3 of the IPCC. A consistent analysis ensures that WG3&amp;amp;#8217;s conclusions about the socioeconomic transformations required to maintain a safe climate are based on the best understanding of our planetary boundaries from WG1. For example, if WG1 determines that climate sensitivity is higher than previously considered, then WG3 could incorporate this insight by e.g. considering much smaller remaining carbon budgets for any given temperature target.&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;&amp;amp;#160;&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;The scenario-climate assessment pipeline is comprised of three primary components. First, a consistent harmonization algorithm which maintains critical model characteristics between harmonized and unharmonized scenarios [1] is employed to harmonize emissions trajectories to a common and consistent historical dataset as used in CMIP6 [2]. Next, a scenario&amp;amp;#8217;s reported emissions trajectories are analyzed as to the completeness of its species and sectoral coverage. A consistent set of 14 emissions species are expected, aligning with published work within ScenarioMIP and CMIP6 (see ref [2], Table 2). Should any component of this full set of emissions trajectories be absent for a given scenario, an algorithm (e.g., generalised quantile walk [3]) is employed in order to &amp;amp;#8220;back-fill&amp;amp;#8221; missing species at the native model region

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=01027849&limit=30&person=true