Imperial College London

DrRalfMartin

Business School

Associate Professor of Economics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2615r.martin

 
 
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Location

 

CAGB 487City and Guilds BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

32 results found

Criscuolo C, Martin R, Overman H, van Reenen Jet al., 2019, Some causal effects of an industrial policy, American Economic Review, Vol: 109, Pages: 48-85, ISSN: 0002-8282

Business support policies designed to raise employment and productivity are ubiquitous around the world. We exploit changes in the area-specific eligibility criteria for a major program to support manufacturing jobs through investment subsidies (Regional Selective Assistance). European state aid rules determine whether a sub-national geographical area is eligible for these subsidies, and we construct instrumental variables for area (and plant) eligibility based on the estimated parameters of these rule changes. We find areas eligible for higher subsidies significantly increase manufacturing jobs and reduce unemployment. An exogenous ten-percentage point increase in an area’s maximum investment subsidy stimulates about a 9% increase in manufacturing employment. The treatment effect exists solely for small firms – large companies appear to “game” the system, accepting subsidies without increasing activity. There are positive effects on investment and employment for incumbent firms but no effect on Total Factor Productivity.

Journal article

Alberts G, Gurguc Z, Koutroumpis P, Martin R, Muuls M, Napp Tet al., 2016, Competition and norms: a self-defeating combination?, Energy Policy, Vol: 96, Pages: 504-523, ISSN: 1873-6777

Journal article

Martin R, Muuls M, Wagner U, The impact of the European Union Emissions Trade Scheme on regulated firms: what is the evidence after ten years?, Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Vol: 10, Pages: 129-148, ISSN: 1750-6824

This article reviews the recent literature on ex post evaluation of the impacts of the European Union (EU) Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) on regulated firms in the industrial and power sectors. We summarize the findings from original research papers concerning three broadly defined impacts: carbon dioxide emissions, economic performance and competitiveness, and innovation. We conclude by highlighting gaps in the current literature and suggesting priorities for future research on this landmark policy. ( JEL : Q52, Q54, Q58)

Journal article

Martin R, Muuls M, Wagner UJ, 2015, Trading Behavior in the EU ETS, Workshop on Emissions Trading as Climate Policy Instruments - Evaluation and Prospects, Publisher: MIT PRESS, Pages: 213-238

Conference paper

Dechezlepretre A, Martin R, Mohnen M, 2014, Policy brief: Clean innovation and growth

Working paper

Martin R, Dechezleprêtre A, Gennaioli C, Muûls Met al., 2014, Searching for carbon leaks in multinational companies, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

Working paper

Martin R, Dechezleprêtre A, Mohnen M, 2014, Knowledge spillovers from clean and dirty technologies, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

Working paper

Martin R, de Preux LB, Wagner UJ, 2014, The impact of a carbon tax on manufacturing: Evidence from microdata, Journal of Public Economics, Vol: 117, Pages: 1-14, ISSN: 0047-2727

Journal article

Martin R, Muûls M, de Preux LB, Wagner UJet al., 2014, On the empirical content of carbon leakage criteria in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme, Ecological Economics, Vol: 105, Pages: 78-88, ISSN: 0921-8009

Journal article

Martin R, Muûls M, de Preux LB, Wagner UJet al., 2014, Industry Compensation under Relocation Risk: A Firm-Level Analysis of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme, American Economic Review, Vol: 104, Pages: 2482-2508, ISSN: 0002-8282

Journal article

Gennaioli C, Martin R, Muuls M, 2013, Using micro data to examine causal effects of climate policy, Handbook on Energy and Climate Change

Book chapter

Criscuolo C, Martin R, Overman H, Reenen JVet al., 2012, The Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy

Business support policies designed to raise productivity and employment are common worldwide, but rigorous micro-econometric evaluation of their causal effects is rare. We exploit multiple changes in the area-specific eligibility criteria for a major program to support manufacturing jobs (�Regional Selective Assistance�). Area eligibility is governed by pan-European state aid rules which change every seven years and we use these rule changes to construct instrumental variables for program participation. We match two decades of UK panel data on the population of firms to all program participants. IV estimates find positive program treatment effect on employment, investment and net entry but not on TFP. OLS underestimates program effects because the policy targets underperforming plants and areas. The treatment effect is confined to smaller firms with no effect for larger firms (e.g. over 150 employees). We also find the policy raises area level manufacturing employment mainly through significantly reducing unemployment. The positive program effect is not due to substitution between plants in the same area or between eligible and ineligible areas nearby. We estimate that �cost per job� of the program was only $6,300 suggesting that in some respects investment subsidies can be cost effective.

Working paper

Martin R, de Preux L, Wagner U, 2012, The polluter-doesn't-pay principle, Publisher: CEP CP 369

Working paper

Martin R, de Preux LB, Wagner UJ, 2011, The Impacts of the Climate Change Levy on Manufacturing: Evidence from Microdata

We estimate the impacts of the Climate Change Levy (CCL) on manufacturing plants using panel data from the UK production census. Our identification strategy builds on the comparison of outcomes between plants subject to the CCL and plants that were granted an 80% discount on the levy after joining a Climate Change Agreement (CCA). Exploiting exogenous variation in eligibility for CCA participation, we find that the CCL had a strong negative impact on energy intensity and electricity use. We cannot reject the hypothesis that the tax had no detrimental effects on economic performance and on plant exit.

Working paper

Anderson B, Leib J, Martin R, McGuigan M, Muuls M, de Preux L, Wagner Uet al., 2011, Climate change policy and business in Europe: evidence from interviewing managers

Working paper

Martin R, Muuls M, Wagner U, 2011, Climate Change, Investment and Carbon Markets and Prices - Evidence from Manager Interviews

Working paper

Martin R, Muûls M, Preux LBD, Wagner UJet al., 2011, Anatomy of a paradox: Management practices, organizational structure and energy efficiency, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Pages: ---, ISSN: 0095-0696

Journal article

Martin R, 2010, Productivity Spreads, Market Power Spreads and Trade

Much of recent Trade theory focuses on heterogeneity of firms and the differential impacttrade policy might have on firms with different levels of productivity. A common problem isthat most firm level dataset do not contain information on output prices of firms which makesit difficult to distinguish between productivity differences and differences in market powerbetween firms. This paper develops a new econometric framework that allows estimatingboth firm specific productivity and market power in a semi-parametric way based on acontrol function approach. The framework is applied to Chilean firm level data from the early1980, shortly after the country underwent wide ranging trade reforms. The finding is that inall sectors of the economy market power declined and productivity increased. In sectors withhigher import penetration productivity particularly at the bottom end of the distributionincreased faster. At the same time market power declined particularly so at the top end of themarket power distribution. We also show, that ignoring the effect on market power leads toan underestimation of the positive effects of increased import penetration on productivity.

Working paper

Martin R, 2010, Why is the US so Energy Intensive? Evidence from US Multinationals in the UK

Working paper

Bloom N, Genakos C, Martin R, Sadun Ret al., 2010, Modern Management: Good for the Environment or Just Hot Air?, Economic Journal, Vol: 120, Pages: 551-572

Journal article

Aghion P, Dechezlepretre A, Hemous D, Martin R, Van Reenen Jet al., 2010, Testing for Path Dependence in Clean vs Dirty Innovation: Evidence from the Automotive Industry

Other

Martin R, Muuls M, de Preux L, Wagner Uet al., 2009, Climate Change Policies and Management Practices

Working paper

Criscuolo C, Martin R, 2009, Multinationals and U.S. Productivity Leadership: Evidence from Great Britain, The Review of Economics and Statistics, Vol: 91, Pages: 263-281

Journal article

Martin R, Wagner U, 2009, Survey of firms’ responses to public incentives for energy innovation, including the UK Climate Change Levy and Climate Change Agreements

Working paper

Martin R, 2008, Productivity Dispersion, Competition and Productivity Measurement*

Other

Bartelsman EJ, Haskel J, Martin R, 2008, Distance to Which Frontier? Evidence on Productivity Convergence from International Firm-level Data

An extensive literature on the convergence of productivity between countries examines whether productivity is pulled towards the global frontier country, perhaps due to learning and knowledge spillovers. More recently, studies within countries use the wide dispersion of productivity across firms to explore convergence to the national frontier. Given this within-country dispersion however between country-dispersion is hard to interpret, for it is quite possible that the best firms in a laggard average country are above at least some firms in a leading average country. This paper therefore uses micro data sets across many countries to build better measures of global and national frontiers and firms’ distance from them. Using UK data, we then find that (a) the national frontier exerts a stronger pull on domestic firms than does the global frontier and (b) the pull from the global frontier falls with technological distance, while the pull from the national frontier does not. This result suggests that firms might lag so far technologically that they cannot learn from the global frontier, while they still are able to benefit from domestic knowledge.

Working paper

Criscuolo C, Martin R, Overman H, van Reenen Jet al., 2006, Evaluation of DTI Business Support Schemes

Other

Martin R, 2005, TFP without capital stocks

Other

Criscuolo C, Haskel J, Martin R, 2004, Import Competition, Productivity, and Restructuring in UK Manufacturing, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol: 20

Journal article

Haskel J, Martin R, 2002, The UK manufacturing productivity spread, http://www.qmul.ac.uk/\verb+ +ugte153/CERIBA/publications/spreads\verb+_+oct17.pdf

Other

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