Imperial College London

DrRichardNicholas

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Brain Sciences

Professor of Practice (Neurology)
 
 
 
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Contact

 

r.nicholas

 
 
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Location

 

12L12CLab BlockCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Nicholas:2003:10.1097/01.wnr.0000068553.33086.4b,
author = {Nicholas, R and Stevens, S and Wing, M and Compston, A},
doi = {10.1097/01.wnr.0000068553.33086.4b},
journal = {Neuroreport},
pages = {1001--1005},
title = {Oligodendroglial-derived stress signals recruit microglia in vitro.},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.wnr.0000068553.33086.4b},
volume = {14},
year = {2003}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Rat oligodendrocytes cultured without the essential survival factors serum and insulin die over a 48 h period. Analysis of supernatants from these dying cultures reveals a microglial chemokine released in advance of significant cell death. The observed microglial chemotactic effect is dose-dependent and not due to release of cellular debris. Interferon (IFN)-gamma activated microglia are more sensitive to the microglial chemokine. We show in co-culture that recruited non-activated microglia can enhance oligodendroglial survival whereas IFN-gamma activation of microglia induces contact-dependent oligodendroglial death. Thus, whilst the initial recruitment of microglia by stressed oligodendroglia may represent part of a survival process engaged by injured cells, this does not necessarily ensure survival.
AU - Nicholas,R
AU - Stevens,S
AU - Wing,M
AU - Compston,A
DO - 10.1097/01.wnr.0000068553.33086.4b
EP - 1005
PY - 2003///
SN - 0959-4965
SP - 1001
TI - Oligodendroglial-derived stress signals recruit microglia in vitro.
T2 - Neuroreport
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.wnr.0000068553.33086.4b
UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12802191
VL - 14
ER -