Imperial College London

DrRaviParekh

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Deputy Director of Medical Education Innovation and Research
 
 
 
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r.parekh

 
 
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Postgraduate CentreReynolds BuildingCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

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13 results found

Parekh R, Jones MM, Singh S, Yuan JSJ, Chan SCC, Mediratta S, Smith R, Gunning E, Gajria C, Kumar S, Park Set al., 2021, Medical students’ experience of the hidden curriculum around primary care careers: a qualitative exploration of reflective diaries, BMJ Open, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Pilling R, Mollaney J, Chandauka R, Barai I, Parekh Ret al., 2021, “BURSTING THE BUBBLE”: Service learning in schools, The Clinical Teacher, Vol: 18, Pages: 163-167, ISSN: 1743-4971

BackgroundAt Imperial College, we developed a novel teaching programme for medical students based within a local primary school, with the aim of developing students’ teaching skills and centring social accountability in our curriculum. Similar service‐learning programmes have shown significant benefit for student participants, including: improving communication skills, developing an understanding of the social determinants of health, and increased empathy. In partnership with a local primary school, the programme involved a group of medical students designing, developing and delivering a teaching session to primary school children.MethodsMedical students completed written reflections on the programme and semi‐structured interviews were conducted with teachers who had participated in the programme. These were then thematically analysed.ResultsThemes from student reflections included: improvement in teaching and communication skills; and an increased awareness of social accountability. Themes from teacher interviews included: benefits of an aspirational figure in the school; engagement of the children; and the ongoing inspirational benefit for the pupils.DiscussionOur analysis suggested students and the school community benefitted. Students reported the experience was an effective way to learn teaching skills and to improve their communication with children. The programme delivered skills transferrable to other clinical contexts including leadership and behavioural management, adaptability and creative thinking. Teacher interviews suggested the programme was mutually beneficial. The framing of medical students as role models raised the possibility that such programmes may help tackle the challenge of widening participation in medicine. We would recommend medical educators to consider developing other mutually beneficial service‐learning programmes.

Journal article

Alboksmaty A, Kumar S, Parekh R, Aylin Pet al., 2021, Management and patient safety of complex elderly patients in primary care during the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK—Qualitative assessment, PLoS One, Vol: 16, Pages: 1-17, ISSN: 1932-6203

ObjectivesThe study aims to investigate GPs’ experiences of how UK COVID-19 policies have affected the management and safety of complex elderly patients, who suffer from multimorbidity, at the primary care level in North West London (NWL).DesignThis is a service evaluation adopting a qualitative approach.SettingIndividual semi-structured interviews were conducted between 6 and 22 May 2020, 2 months after the introduction of the UK COVID-19 Action Plan, allowing GPs to adapt to the new changes and reflect on their impact.ParticipantsFourteen GPs working in NWL were interviewed, until data saturation was reached.Outcome measuresThe impact of COVID-19 policies on the management and safety of complex elderly patients in primary care from the GPs’ perspective.ResultsParticipants’ average experience was fourteen years working in primary care for the NHS. They stated that COVID-19 policies have affected primary care at three levels, patients’ behaviour, work conditions, and clinical practice. GPs reflected on the impact through five major themes; four of which have been adapted from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) framework, changes in primary care (at the three levels mentioned above), involvement of GPs in policy making, communication and coordination (with patients and in between medical teams), stressors and worries; in addition to a fifth theme to conclude the GPs’ suggestions for improvement (either proposed mitigation strategies, or existing actions that showed relative success). A participant used an expression of “infodemic” to describe the GPs’ everyday pressure of receiving new policy updates with their subsequent changes in practice.ConclusionThe COVID-19 pandemic has affected all levels of the health system in the UK, particularly primary care. Based on the GPs’ perspective in NWL, changes to practice have offered opportunities to maintain safe healthcare as well as possible drawbacks that should b

Journal article

Hawkins N, Younan H-C, Fyfe M, Parekh R, McKeown Aet al., 2021, Exploring why medical students still feel underprepared for clinical practice: a qualitative analysis of an authentic on-call simulation, BMC Medical Education, Vol: 21, ISSN: 1472-6920

BackgroundCurrent research shows that many UK medical graduates continue to feel underprepared to work as a junior doctor. Most research in this field has focused on new graduates and employed the use of retrospective self-rating questionnaires. There remains a lack of detailed understanding of the challenges encountered in preparing for clinical practice, specifically those faced by medical students, where relevant educational interventions could have a significant impact. Through use of a novel on-call simulation, we set out to determine factors affecting perceived preparation for practice in final year medical students and identify ways in which we may better support them throughout their undergraduate training.Methods30 final year medical students from Imperial College London participated in a 90-minute simulation on hospital wards, developed to recreate a realistic on-call experience of a newly qualified doctor. Students partook in pairs, each observed by a qualified doctor taking field notes on their decisions and actions. A 60-minute semi-structured debrief between observer and student pair was audio-recorded for analysis. Field notes and students’ clinical documentation were used to explore any challenges encountered. Debrief transcripts were thematically analysed through a general inductive approach. Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) was used as a lens through which to finalise the evolving themes.ResultsSix key themes emerged from the on-call simulation debriefs: information overload, the reality gap, making use of existing knowledge, negative feelings and emotions, unfamiliar surroundings, and learning ‘on the job’.ConclusionsThe combination of high fidelity on-call simulation, close observation and personalised debrief offers a novel insight into the difficulties faced by undergraduates in their preparation for work as a junior doctor. In using CLT to conceptualise the data, we can begin to understand how cognitive load may be optimised withi

Journal article

McKeown A, Mollaney J, Ahuja N, Parekh R, Kumar Set al., 2019, UK longitudinal integrated clerkships: where are we now?, Education for Primary Care, Pages: 1-5, ISSN: 1473-9879

In this article, we discuss whether it is possible for UK institutions to influence the international longitudinal integrated clerkship (LIC) narrative, in the context of supplying future clinicians to a fragmented health service that is battling a General Practice recruitment crisis. Perhaps more importantly, we will discuss whether the ‘LIC model’ fits the UK undergraduate framework. We intend to present some emerging evidence of LICs in the UK, informed by a UK-wide survey and observations from a 2019 UK LIC think tank and then discuss whether the global CLIC definition applies to the UK context with possible ways forward.

Journal article

Simpkin A, McKeown A, Parekh R, Kumar S, Tudor-Williams Get al., 2019, Identifying central tenets needed in our education systems: results from a pilot integrated clinical apprenticeship, Medical Teacher, ISSN: 0142-159X

Purpose:The ability of healthcare systems to deliver world-class compassionate care depends on the quality of training and education of staff. Matching student-centered learning with patient-centered care is the focus for much curricula reform. This study explores the effect a novel longitudinal curriculum had on medical students’attitudes and experiences to better identify central tenets needed in our education system. Methods:Single-center, qualitative focus-group study conducted in 2017 of medical students in a longitudinally integrated clinical apprenticeship at a large UK medical school. Students were randomly assigned to focus groups to describe their educational journey and explore how longitudinal learning prepared them for a medical career, valuing their unique pos- ition as student participants in the healthcare system. Results:Four themes emerged from students’experiences: navigating the patient journey, their professional development, their learning journey, and the healthcare system. Conclusions:Listening to student voices lends insights for educators refining educational models to produce doctors of tomorrow. This project identified the educational value of students having authentic roles in helping patients navigate the healthcare system and the benefits of consistent mentorship and greater autonomy. The gulf between gaining skills as a future doctor and gaining skills to pass summative exams calls into question assessment methods.

Journal article

Simpkin AL, McKeown AM, Parekh R, Kumar S, Tudor-Williams Get al., 2017, A novel Integrated Clinical Apprenticeship: transforming medical students into student doctors, EDUCATION FOR PRIMARY CARE, Vol: 28, Pages: 288-290, ISSN: 1473-9879

Journal article

McKeown A, Parekh R, 2017, Longitudinal integrated clerkships in the community, EDUCATION FOR PRIMARY CARE, Vol: 28, Pages: 185-187, ISSN: 1473-9879

Journal article

McKay AJ, Parekh R, Majeed A, 2016, Implications of the imposition of the junior doctor contract in England, Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, Vol: 109, Pages: 128-130, ISSN: 1758-1095

Journal article

Parekh R, Fattah Z, Sahota D, Colaco Bet al., 2014, Clozapine induced tubulointerstitial nephritis in a patient with paranoid schizophrenia., BMJ Case Rep, Vol: 2014

We describe the development of tubulointerstitial nephritis after starting clozapine therapy in a patient with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. A 54-year-old mixed-race patient with a longstanding history of paranoid schizophrenia was started on the antipsychotic clozapine. Two months after starting clozapine he developed fevers, cough and acute renal failure which initially responded to 7 days of prednisolone but recurred after completing the steroid course. Renal biopsy confirmed acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and he was started on a course of steroids with renal recovery in 72 h. Clozapine was later stopped. This case highlights a serious and potential life-threatening complication of an important antipsychotic used in treatment-resistant schizophrenia.

Journal article

Parekh R, Shah R, Darko D, Khanna Pet al., 2013, Brucellosis disguised as infective endocarditis in the returning traveller., JRSM Short Rep, Vol: 4, Pages: 1-3, ISSN: 2042-5333

Journal article

Parekh R, Green E, Majeed A, 2012, Obstructive sleep apnoea: quantifying its association with obesity and snoring, PRIMARY CARE RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 21, Pages: 361-362, ISSN: 1471-4418

Journal article

Parekh R, Beaconsfield T, Kong WM, 2012, A woman with neck pain and shortness of breath, BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 345, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

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