Imperial College London

DrRahaPazoki

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Honorary Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1174r.pazoki

 
 
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Location

 

VC7Praed StreetSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

58 results found

O'Farrell F, Jiang X, Aljifri S, Pazoki Ret al., 2022, Molecular Alterations Caused by Alcohol Consumption in the UK Biobank: A Mendelian Randomisation Study., Nutrients, Vol: 14

Alcohol consumption is associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and liver disease. The biological mechanisms are still largely unclear. Here, we aimed to use an agnostic approach to identify phenotypes mediating the effect of alcohol on various diseases. METHODS: We performed an agnostic association analysis between alcohol consumption (red and white wine, beer/cider, fortified wine, and spirits) with over 7800 phenotypes from the UK biobank comprising 223,728 participants. We performed Mendelian randomisation analysis to infer causality. We additionally performed a Phenome-wide association analysis and a mediation analysis between alcohol consumption as exposure, phenotypes in a causal relationship with alcohol consumption as mediators, and various diseases as the outcome. RESULTS: Of 45 phenotypes in association with alcohol consumption, 20 were in a causal relationship with alcohol consumption. Gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT; β = 9.44; 95% CI = 5.94, 12.93; Pfdr = 9.04 × 10-7), mean sphered cell volume (β = 0.189; 95% CI = 0.11, 0.27; Pfdr = 1.00 × 10-4), mean corpuscular volume (β = 0.271; 95% CI = 0.19, 0.35; Pfdr = 7.09 × 10-10) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (β = 0.278; 95% CI = 0.19, 0.36; Pfdr = 1.60 × 10-6) demonstrated the strongest causal relationships. We also identified GGT and physical inactivity as mediators in the pathway between alcohol consumption, liver cirrhosis and alcohol dependence. CONCLUSION: Our study provides evidence of causality between alcohol consumption and 20 phenotypes and a mediation effect for physical activity on health consequences of alcohol consumption.

Journal article

Said S, Pazoki R, Karhunen V, Vosa U, Ligthart S, Bodinier B, Koskeridis F, Welsh P, Alizadeh BZ, Chasman DI, Sattar N, Chadeau-Hyam M, Evangelou E, Jarvelin M-R, Elliott P, Tzoulaki I, Dehghan Aet al., 2022, Genetic analysis of over half a million people characterises C-reactive protein loci (vol 13, 2198, 2022), Nature Communications, Vol: 13, Pages: 1-1, ISSN: 2041-1723

Journal article

Said S, Karhunen V, vosa U, ligthart S, Bodinier B, Koskeridis F, welsh P, Alizadeh B, Daniel C, sattar N, Chadeau M, evalgelou E, Jarvelin M-R, Elliott P, Tzoulaki I, Dehghan Aet al., 2022, Genetic analysis of over half a million people characterises C-reactive protein loci, Nature Communications, Vol: 13, ISSN: 2041-1723

Chronic low-grade inflammation is linked to a multitude of chronic diseases. We report the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) on C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, in UK Biobank participants (N = 427,367, European descent) and the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium (total N = 575,531 European descent). We identify 266 independent loci, of which 211 are not previously reported. Gene-set analysis highlighted 42 gene sets associated with CRP levels (p ≤ 3.2 ×10−6) and tissue expression analysis indicated a strong association of CRP related genes with liver and whole blood gene expression. Phenome-wide association study identified 27 clinical outcomes associated with genetically determined CRP and subsequent Mendelian randomisation analyses supported a causal association with schizophrenia, chronic airway obstruction and prostate cancer. Our findings identified genetic loci and functional properties of chronic low-grade inflammation and provided evidence for causal associations with a range of diseases.

Journal article

Roa-Diaz ZM, Asllanaj E, Amin HA, Rojas LZ, Nano J, Ikram MA, Drenos F, Franco OH, Pazoki R, Marques-Vidal P, Voortman T, Muka Tet al., 2021, Age at Natural Menopause and Blood Pressure Traits: Mendelian Randomization Study, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, Vol: 10

Journal article

Evangelou E, Suzuki H, Bai W, Pazoki R, Gao H, Matthews P, Elliott Pet al., 2021, Alcohol consumption in the general population is associated with structural changes in multiple organ systems., eLife, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-15, ISSN: 2050-084X

Background:Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with damage to various organs, but its multi-organ effects have not been characterised across the usual range of alcohol drinking in a large general population sample.Methods:We assessed global effect sizes of alcohol consumption on quantitative magnetic resonance imaging phenotypic measures of the brain, heart, aorta, and liver of UK Biobank participants who reported drinking alcohol.Results:We found a monotonic association of higher alcohol consumption with lower normalised brain volume across the range of alcohol intakes (–1.7 × 10−3 ± 0.76 × 10−3 per doubling of alcohol consumption, p=3.0 × 10−14). Alcohol consumption was also associated directly with measures of left ventricular mass index and left ventricular and atrial volume indices. Liver fat increased by a mean of 0.15% per doubling of alcohol consumption.Conclusions:Our results imply that there is not a ‘safe threshold’ below which there are no toxic effects of alcohol. Current public health guidelines concerning alcohol consumption may need to be revisited.

Journal article

Pazoki R, Elliott J, Evangelou E, Gill D, Pinto R, Zuber V, Said S, Dehghan A, Tzoulaki I, Jarvelin MR, Thursz M, Elliott Pet al., 2021, Genetic analysis in European ancestry individuals identifies 517 loci associated with liver enzymes, Nature Communications, Vol: 12, ISSN: 2041-1723

Serum concentration of hepatic enzymes are linked to liver dysfunction, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. We perform genetic analysis on serum levels of alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) using data on 437,438 UK Biobank participants. Replication in 315,572 individuals from European descent from the Million Veteran Program, Rotterdam Study and Lifeline study confirms 517 liver enzyme SNPs. Genetic risk score analysis using the identified SNPs is strongly associated with serum activity of liver enzymes in two independent European descent studies (The Airwave Health Monitoring study and the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966). Gene-set enrichment analysis using the identified SNPs highlights involvement in liver development and function, lipid metabolism, insulin resistance, and vascular formation. Mendelian randomization analysis shows association of liver enzyme variants with coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke. Genetic risk score for elevated serum activity of liver enzymes is associated with higher fat percentage of body, trunk, and liver and body mass index. Our study highlights the role of molecular pathways regulated by the liver in metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease.

Journal article

Pazoki R, Lin BD, van Eijk KR, Schijven D, de Zwarte S, Guloksuz S, Luykx JJet al., 2021, Phenome-wide and genome-wide analyses of quality of life in schizophrenia (vol 7, e13, 2021), BJPSYCH OPEN, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2056-4724

Journal article

Pazoki R, Lin BD, van Eijk KR, Schijven D, de Zwarte S, Guloksuz S, Luykx JJet al., 2020, Phenome-wide and genome-wide analyses of quality of life in schizophrenia, BJPSYCH OPEN, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2056-4724

Journal article

Elliott P, Muller DC, Schneider-Luftman D, Pazoki R, Evangelou E, Dehghan A, Neal B, Tzoulaki Iet al., 2020, Estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion and incident cardiovascular disease and mortality among 398 628 individuals in UK biobank., Hypertension, Vol: 76, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 0194-911X

We report on an analysis to explore the association between estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion (surrogate for sodium intake) and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Data were obtained from 398 628 UK Biobank prospective cohort study participants (40-69 years) recruited between 2006 and 2010, with no history of CVD, renal disease, diabetes mellitus or cancer, and cardiovascular events and mortality recorded during follow-up. Hazard ratios between 24-hour sodium excretion were estimated from spot urinary sodium concentrations across incident CVD and its components and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. In restricted cubic splines analyses, there was little evidence for an association between estimated 24-hour sodium excretion and CVD, coronary heart disease, or stroke; hazard ratios for CVD (95% CIs) for the 15th and 85th percentiles (2.5 and 4.2 g/day, respectively) compared with the 50th percentile of estimated sodium excretion (3.2 g/day) were 1.05 (1.01-1.10) and 0.96 (0.92-1.00), respectively. An inverse association was observed with heart failure, but that was no longer apparent in sensitivity analysis. A J-shaped association was observed between estimated sodium excretion and mortality. Our findings do not support a J-shaped association of estimated sodium excretion with CVD, although such an association was apparent for all-cause and cause-specific mortality across a wide range of diseases. Reasons for these differences are unclear; methodological limitations, including the use of estimating equations based on spot urinary data, need to be considered in interpreting our findings.

Journal article

Robinson O, Chadeau Hyam M, Karaman I, Climaco Pinto R, Ala-Korpela M, Handakas E, Fiorito G, Gao H, Heard A, Jarvelin M-R, Lewis M, Pazoki R, Polidoro S, Tzoulaki I, Wielscher M, Elliott P, Vineis Pet al., 2020, Determinants of accelerated metabolomic and epigenetic ageing in a UK cohort, Aging Cell, Vol: 19, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1474-9718

Markers of biological aging have potential utility in primary care and public health. We developed a model of age based on untargeted metabolic profiling across multiple platforms, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry in urine and serum, within a large sample (N = 2,239) from the UK Airwave cohort. We validated a subset of model predictors in a Finnish cohort including repeat measurements from 2,144 individuals. We investigated the determinants of accelerated aging, including lifestyle and psychological risk factors for premature mortality. The metabolomic age model was well correlated with chronological age (mean r = .86 across independent test sets). Increased metabolomic age acceleration (mAA) was associated after false discovery rate (FDR) correction with overweight/obesity, diabetes, heavy alcohol use and depression. DNA methylation age acceleration measures were uncorrelated with mAA. Increased DNA methylation phenotypic age acceleration (N = 1,110) was associated after FDR correction with heavy alcohol use, hypertension and low income. In conclusion, metabolomics is a promising approach for the assessment of biological age and appears complementary to established epigenetic clocks.

Journal article

Schmidt AF, Holmes MV, Preiss D, Swerdlow DI, Denaxas S, Fatemifar G, Faraway R, Finan C, Valentine D, Fairhurst-Hunter Z, Hartwig FP, Horta BL, Hypponen E, Power C, Moldovan M, van Iperen E, Hovingh K, Demuth I, Norman K, Steinhagen-Thiessen E, Demuth J, Bertram L, Lill CM, Coassin S, Willeit J, Kiechl S, Willeit K, Mason D, Wright J, Morris R, Wanamethee G, Whincup P, Ben-Shlomo Y, McLachlan S, Price JF, Kivimaki M, Welch C, Sanchez-Galvez A, Marques-Vidal P, Nicolaides A, Panayiotou AG, Onland-Moret NC, van der Schouw YT, Matullo G, Fiorito G, Guarrera S, Sacerdote C, Wareham NJ, Langenberg C, Scott RA, Luan J, Bobak M, Malyutina S, Pająk A, Kubinova R, Tamosiunas A, Pikhart H, Grarup N, Pedersen O, Hansen T, Linneberg A, Jess T, Cooper J, Humphries SE, Brilliant M, Kitchner T, Hakonarson H, Carrell DS, McCarty CA, Lester KH, Larson EB, Crosslin DR, de Andrade M, Roden DM, Denny JC, Carty C, Hancock S, Attia J, Holliday E, Scott R, Schofield P, O'Donnell M, Yusuf S, Chong M, Pare G, van der Harst P, Said MA, Eppinga RN, Verweij N, Snieder H, Lifelines Cohort authors, Christen T, Mook-Kanamori DO, ICBP Consortium, Gustafsson S, Lind L, Ingelsson E, Pazoki R, Franco O, Hofman A, Uitterlinden A, Dehghan A, Teumer A, Baumeister S, Dörr M, Lerch MM, Völker U, Völzke H, Ward J, Pell JP, Meade T, Christophersen IE, Maitland-van der Zee AH, Baranova EV, Young R, Ford I, Campbell A, Padmanabhan S, Bots ML, Grobbee DE, Froguel P, Thuillier D, Roussel R, Bonnefond A, Cariou B, Smart M, Bao Y, Kumari M, Mahajan A, Hopewell JC, Seshadri S, METASTROKE Consortium of the ISGC, Dale C, Costa RPE, Ridker PM, Chasman DI, Reiner AP, Ritchie MD, Lange LA, Cornish AJ, Dobbins SE, Hemminki K, Kinnersley B, Sanson M, Labreche K, Simon M, Bondy M, Law P, Speedy H, Allan J, Li N, Went M, Weinhold N, Morgan G, Sonneveld P, Nilsson B, Goldschmidt H, Sud A, Engert A, Hansson M, Hemingway H, Asselbergs FW, Patel RS, Keating BJ, Sattar N, Houlston R, Casas JP, Hingorani ADet al., 2019, Phenome-wide association analysis of LDL-cholesterol lowering genetic variants in PCSK9, BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, Vol: 19, ISSN: 1471-2261

BACKGROUND: We characterised the phenotypic consequence of genetic variation at the PCSK9 locus and compared findings with recent trials of pharmacological inhibitors of PCSK9. METHODS: Published and individual participant level data (300,000+ participants) were combined to construct a weighted PCSK9 gene-centric score (GS). Seventeen randomized placebo controlled PCSK9 inhibitor trials were included, providing data on 79,578 participants. Results were scaled to a one mmol/L lower LDL-C concentration. RESULTS: The PCSK9 GS (comprising 4 SNPs) associations with plasma lipid and apolipoprotein levels were consistent in direction with treatment effects. The GS odds ratio (OR) for myocardial infarction (MI) was 0.53 (95% CI 0.42; 0.68), compared to a PCSK9 inhibitor effect of 0.90 (95% CI 0.86; 0.93). For ischemic stroke ORs were 0.84 (95% CI 0.57; 1.22) for the GS, compared to 0.85 (95% CI 0.78; 0.93) in the drug trials. ORs with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were 1.29 (95% CI 1.11; 1.50) for the GS, as compared to 1.00 (95% CI 0.96; 1.04) for incident T2DM in PCSK9 inhibitor trials. No genetic associations were observed for cancer, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or Alzheimer's disease - outcomes for which large-scale trial data were unavailable. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic variation at the PCSK9 locus recapitulates the effects of therapeutic inhibition of PCSK9 on major blood lipid fractions and MI. While indicating an increased risk of T2DM, no other possible safety concerns were shown; although precision was moderate.

Journal article

Evangelou E, Gao H, Blakeley P, Pazoki R, Suzuki H, Elliott J, Karaman I, Jarvelin MR, Tzoulaki I, Bell JD, Matthews PM, Elliott Pet al., 2019, New alcohol-related genes suggest shared genetic mechanisms with neuropsychiatric disorders, Nature Human Behaviour, Vol: 3, Pages: 950-961, ISSN: 2397-3374

Excessive alcohol consumption is one of the main causes of death and disability worldwide. Alcohol consumption is a heritable complex trait. Here we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of alcohol consumption (g d−1) from the UK Biobank, the Alcohol Genome-Wide Consortium and the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Plus consortia, collecting data from 480,842 people of European descent to decipher the genetic architecture of alcohol intake. We identified 46 new common loci and investigated their potential functional importance using magnetic resonance imaging data and gene expression studies. We identify genetic pathways associated with alcohol consumption and suggest genetic mechanisms that are shared with neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

Journal article

Pazoki R, Lin BD, van Eijk KR, Schijven D, Guloksuz S, Luykx JJet al., 2019, Phenome-wide and Genome-wide Analyses of Quality of Life in Schizophrenia

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p>Schizophrenia negatively impacts quality of life (QoL). A handful of variables from small studies have been reported to influence QoL of schizophrenia patients, but a study comprehensively dissecting the genetic and non-genetic contributing factors to QoL in these patients is currently lacking. We adopted a hypothesis-generating approach to assess the phenotypic and genotypic determinants of QoL in schizophrenia.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Method</jats:title><jats:p>The study population consisted of 1,119 patients with a psychotic disorder, 1,979 relatives and 586 healthy controls. Using linear regression, we tested &gt;100 independent demographic, cognitive and clinical phenotypes for their association with QoL in patients. We then performed genome-wide association analyses of QoL and examined the association between polygenic risk scores (PRSs) for schizophrenia, major depressive disorder (MDD), and subjective wellbeing (SW) with QoL.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>We found nine phenotypes to be significantly and independently associated with QoL in patients, the most significant ones being negative (Beta=-1.17; SE=0.05, P=1×10<jats:sup>-83</jats:sup>; r<jats:sup>2</jats:sup>=53%), depressive (Beta=-1.07; SE=0.05; P=2×10<jats:sup>-79</jats:sup>; r<jats:sup>2</jats:sup>=51%) and emotional distress (Beta=-0.09; SE=0.01; P=4×10<jats:sup>-59</jats:sup>, r<jats:sup>2</jats:sup>=38%) symptoms. Schizophrenia and subjective wellbeing PRSs using various P-value thresholds were significantly and consistently associated with QoL (lowest association p-value = 6.8×10<jats:sup>-6</jats:sup>). Several sensitivity analyses confi

Journal article

Pazoki R, Evangelou E, Mosen-Ansorena D, Pinto R, Karaman I, Blakeley P, Gill D, Zuber V, Elliott P, Tzoulaki I, Dehghan Aet al., 2019, GWAS for urinary sodium and potassium excretion highlights pathways shared with cardiovascular traits, Nature Communications, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2041-1723

Urinary sodium and potassium excretion are associated with blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The exact biological link between these traits is yet to be elucidated. Here, we identify 51 loci for sodium and 13 for potassium excretion in a large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS) on urinary sodium and potassium excretion using data from 446,237 individuals of European descent from the UK Biobank study. We extensively interrogate the results using multiple analyses such as Mendelian randomization, functional assessment, co localization, genetic risk score, and pathway analyses. We identify a shared genetic component between urinary sodium and potassium expression and cardiovascular traits. Ingenuity pathway analysis shows that urinary sodium and potassium excretion loci are over represented in behavioural response to stimuli. Our study highlights pathways that are shared between urinary sodium and potassium excretion and cardiovascular traits.

Journal article

Pazoki R, 2019, Cardiovascular disease, ABO locus, and markers of platelet functionality, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 286, Pages: 162-163, ISSN: 0167-5273

Journal article

de Vries PS, Brown MR, Bentley AR, Sung YJ, Winkler TW, Ntalla I, Schwander K, Kraja AT, Guo X, Franceschini N, Cheng C-Y, Sim X, Vojinovic D, Huffman JE, Musani SK, Li C, Feitosa MF, Richard MA, Noordam R, Aschard H, Bartz TM, Bielak LF, Deng X, Dorajoo R, Lohman KK, Manning AK, Rankinen T, Smith AV, Tajuddin SM, Evangelou E, Graff M, Alver M, Boissel M, Chai JF, Chen X, Divers J, Gandin I, Gao C, Goel A, Hagemeijer Y, Harris SE, Hartwig FP, He M, Horimoto ARVR, Hsu F-C, Jackson AU, Kasturiratne A, Komulainen P, Kühnel B, Laguzzi F, Lee JH, Luan J, Lyytikäinen L-P, Matoba N, Nolte IM, Pietzner M, Riaz M, Said MA, Scott RA, Sofer T, Stancáková A, Takeuchi F, Tayo BO, van der Most PJ, Varga TV, Wang Y, Ware EB, Wen W, Yanek LR, Zhang W, Zhao JH, Afaq S, Amin N, Amini M, Arking DE, Aung T, Ballantyne C, Boerwinkle E, Broeckel U, Campbell A, Canouil M, Charumathi S, Chen Y-DI, Connell JM, de Faire U, de Las Fuentes L, de Mutsert R, de Silva HJ, Ding J, Dominiczak AF, Duan Q, Eaton CB, Eppinga RN, Faul JD, Fisher V, Forrester T, Franco OH, Friedlander Y, Ghanbari M, Giulianini F, Grabe HJ, Grove ML, Gu CC, Harris TB, Heikkinen S, Heng C-K, Hirata M, Hixson JE, Howard BV, Ikram MA, InterAct Consortium, Jacobs DR, Johnson C, Jonas JB, Kammerer CM, Katsuya T, Khor CC, Kilpeläinen TO, Koh W-P, Koistinen HA, Kolcic I, Kooperberg C, Krieger JE, Kritchevsky SB, Kubo M, Kuusisto J, Lakka TA, Langefeld CD, Langenberg C, Launer LJ, Lehne B, Lemaitre RN, Li Y, Liang J, Liu J, Liu K, Loh M, Louie T, Mägi R, Manichaikul AW, McKenzie CA, Meitinger T, Metspalu A, Milaneschi Y, Milani L, Mohlke KL, Mosley TH, Mukamal KJ, Nalls MA, Nauck M, Nelson CP, Sotoodehnia N, O'Connell JR, Palmer ND, Pazoki R, Pedersen NL, Peters A, Peyser PA, Polasek O, Poulter N, Raffel LJ, Raitakari OT, Reiner AP, Rice TK, Rich SS, Robino A, Robinson JG, Rose LM, Rudan I, Schmidt CO, Schreiner PJ, Scott WR, Sever P, Shi Y, Sidney S, Sims M, Smith BH, Smith JA, Snieder H, Starr JM, Strauch K, Tan N, Taylor KDet al., 2019, Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of lipid levels incorporating gene-alcohol interactions, American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol: 188, Pages: 1033-1054, ISSN: 1476-6256

An individual's lipid profile is influenced by genetic variants and alcohol consumption, but the contribution of interactions between these exposures has not been studied. We therefore incorporated gene-alcohol interactions into a multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. We included 45 studies in Stage 1 (genome-wide discovery) and 66 studies in Stage 2 (focused follow-up), for a total of 394,584 individuals from five ancestry groups. Genetic main and interaction effects were jointly assessed by a 2 degrees of freedom (DF) test, and a 1 DF test was used to assess the interaction effects alone. Variants at 495 loci were at least suggestively associated (P < 1 × 10-6) with lipid levels in Stage 1 and were evaluated in Stage 2, followed by combined analyses of Stage 1 and Stage 2. In the combined analysis of Stage 1 and Stage 2, 147 independent loci were associated with lipid levels at P < 5 × 10-8 using 2 DF tests, of which 18 were novel. No genome-wide significant associations were found testing the interaction effect alone. The novel loci included several genes (PCSK5, VEGFB, and A1CF) with a putative role in lipid metabolism based on existing evidence from cellular and experimental models.

Journal article

Davies G, Lam M, Harris SE, Trampush JW, Luciano M, Hill WD, Hagenaars SP, Ritchie SJ, Marioni RE, Fawns-Ritchie C, Liewald DCM, Okely JA, Ahola-Olli AV, Barnes CLK, Bertram L, Bis JC, Burdick KE, Christoforou A, DeRosse P, Djurovic S, Espeseth T, Giakoumaki S, Giddaluru S, Gustavson DE, Hayward C, Hofer E, Ikram MA, Karlsson R, Knowles E, Lahti J, Leber M, Li S, Mather KA, Melle I, Morris D, Oldmeadow C, Palviainen T, Payton A, Pazoki R, Petrovic K, Reynolds CA, Sargurupremraj M, Scholz M, Smith JA, Smith AV, Terzikhan N, Thalamuthu A, Trompet S, van der Lee SJ, Ware EB, Windham BG, Wright MJ, Yang J, Yu J, Ames D, Amin N, Amouyel P, Andreassen OA, Armstrong NJ, Assareh AA, Attia JR, Attix D, Avramopoulos D, Bennett DA, Boehmer AC, Boyle PA, Brodaty H, Campbell H, Cannon TD, Cirulli ET, Congdon E, Conley ED, Corley J, Cox SR, Dale AM, Dehghan A, Dick D, Dickinson D, Eriksson JG, Evangelou E, Faul JD, Ford I, Freimer NA, Gao H, Giegling I, Gillespie NA, Gordon SD, Gottesman RF, Griswold ME, Gudnason V, Harris TB, Hartmann AM, Hatzimanolis A, Heiss G, Holliday EG, Joshi PK, Kahonen M, Kardia SLR, Karlsson I, Kleineidam L, Knopman DS, Kochan NA, Konte B, Kwok JB, Le Hellard S, Lee T, Lehtimaki T, Li S-C, Lill CM, Liu T, Koini M, London E, Longstreth WT, Lopez OL, Loukola A, Luck T, Lundervold AJ, Lundquist A, Lyytikainen L-P, Martin NG, Montgomery GW, Murray AD, Need AC, Noordam R, Nyberg L, Ollier W, Papenberg G, Pattie A, Polasek O, Poldrack RA, Psaty BM, Reppermund S, Riedel-Heller SG, Rose RJ, Rotter JI, Roussos P, Rovio SP, Saba Y, Sabb FW, Sachdev PS, Satizabal CL, Schmid M, Scott RJ, Scult MA, Simino J, Slagboom PE, Smyrnis N, Soumare A, Stefanis NC, Stott DJ, Straub RE, Sundet K, Taylor AM, Taylor KD, Tzoulaki I, Tzourio C, Uitterlinden A, Vitart V, Voineskos AN, Kaprio J, Wagner M, Wagner H, Weinhold L, Wen KH, Widen E, Yang Q, Zhao W, Adams HHH, Arking DE, Bilder RM, Bitsios P, Boerwinkle E, Chiba-Falek O, Corvin A, De Jager PL, Debette S, Donohoe G, Elliottet al., 2019, Study of 300,486 individuals identifies 148 independent genetic loci influencing general cognitive function (vol 9, 2098, 2018), NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2041-1723

Journal article

Kilpelainen TO, Bentley AR, Noordam R, Sung YJ, Schwander K, Winkler TW, Jakupovic H, Chasman DI, Manning A, Ntalla I, Aschard H, Brown MR, de las Fuentes L, Franceschini N, Guo X, Vojinovic D, Aslibekyan S, Feitosa MF, Kho M, Musani SK, Richard M, Wang H, Wang Z, Bartz TM, Bielak LF, Campbell A, Dorajoo R, Fisher V, Hartwig FP, Horimoto ARVR, Li C, Lohman KK, Marten J, Sim X, Smith AV, Tajuddin SM, Alver M, Amini M, Boissel M, Chai JF, Chen X, Divers J, Evangelou E, Gao C, Graff M, Harris SE, He M, Hsu F-C, Jackson AU, Zhao JH, Kraja AT, Kuehnel B, Laguzzi F, Lyytikainen L-P, Nolte IM, Rauramaa R, Riaz M, Robino A, Rueedi R, Stringham HM, Takeuchi F, van der Most PJ, Varga TV, Verweij N, Ware EB, Wen W, Li X, Yanek LR, Amin N, Arnett DK, Boerwinkle E, Brumat M, Cade B, Canouil M, Chen Y-DI, Concas MP, Connell J, de Mutsert R, de Silva HJ, de Vries PS, Demirkan A, Ding J, Eaton CB, Faul JD, Friedlander Y, Gabriel KP, Ghanbari M, Giulianini F, Gu CC, Gu D, Harris TB, He J, Heikkinen S, Heng C-K, Hunt SC, Ikram MA, Jonas JB, Koh W-P, Komulainen P, Krieger JE, Kritchevsky SB, Kutalik Z, Kuusisto J, Langefeld CD, Langenberg C, Launer LJ, Leander K, Lemaitre RN, Lewis CE, Liang J, Alizadeh BZ, Boezen HM, Franke L, Navis G, Rots M, Swertz M, Wolffenbuttel BHR, Wijmenga C, Liu J, Magi R, Manichaikul A, Meitinger T, Metspalu A, Milaneschi Y, Mohlke KL, Mosley TH, Murray AD, Nalls MA, Nang E-EK, Nelson CP, Nona S, Norris JM, Nwuba CV, O'Connell J, Palmer ND, Papanicolau GJ, Pazoki R, Pedersen NL, Peters A, Peyser PA, Polasek O, Porteous DJ, Poveda A, Raitakari OT, Rich SS, Risch N, Robinson JG, Rose LM, Rudan I, Schreiner PJ, Scott RA, Sidney SS, Sims M, Smith JA, Snieder H, Sofer T, Starr JM, Sternfeld B, Strauch K, Tang H, Taylor KD, Tsai MY, Tuomilehto J, Uitterlinden AG, van der Ende MY, van Heemst D, Voortman T, Waldenberger M, Wennberg P, Wilson G, Xiang Y-B, Yao J, Yu C, Yuan J-M, Zhao W, Zonderman AB, Becker DM, Boehnke M, Bowden DW, de Faire U, Deary IJ, Elliott Pet al., 2019, Multi-ancestry study of blood lipid levels identifies four loci interacting with physical activity, Nature Communications, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2041-1723

Many genetic loci affect circulating lipid levels, but it remains unknown whether lifestyle factors, such as physical activity, modify these genetic effects. To identify lipid loci interacting with physical activity, we performed genome-wide analyses of circulating HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels in up to 120,979 individuals of European, African, Asian, Hispanic, and Brazilian ancestry, with follow-up of suggestive associations in an additional 131,012 individuals. We find four loci, in/near CLASP1, LHX1, SNTA1, and CNTNAP2, that are associated with circulating lipid levels through interaction with physical activity; higher levels of physical activity enhance the HDL cholesterol-increasing effects of the CLASP1, LHX1, and SNTA1 loci and attenuate the LDL cholesterol-increasing effect of the CNTNAP2 locus. The CLASP1, LHX1, and SNTA1 regions harbor genes linked to muscle function and lipid metabolism. Our results elucidate the role of physical activity interactions in the genetic contribution to blood lipid levels.

Journal article

Pazoki R, Dehghan A, Evangelou E, Warren H, Gao H, Caulfield M, Elliott P, Tzoulaki Iet al., 2019, Genetic Predisposition to High Blood Pressure and Lifestyle Factors: Associations With Midlife Blood Pressure Levels and Cardiovascular Events (vol 137, pg 653, 2018), CIRCULATION, Vol: 139, Pages: E2-E2, ISSN: 0009-7322

Journal article

Evangelou E, Warren HR, Mosen-Ansorena D, Mifsud B, Pazoki R, Gao H, Ntritsos G, Dimou N, Cabrera CP, Karaman I, Fu LN, Evangelou M, Witkowska K, Tzanis E, Hellwege JN, Giri A, Edwards DRV, Sun YV, Cho K, Gaziano JM, Wilson PWF, Tsao PS, Kovesdy CP, Esko T, Magi R, Milani L, Almgren P, Boutin T, Debette S, Ding J, Giulianini F, Holliday EG, Jackson AU, Li-Gao R, Lin W-Y, Luan J, Mangino M, Oldmeadow C, Prins BP, Qian Y, Sargurupremraj M, Shah N, Surendran P, Theriault S, Verweij N, Willems SM, Zhao J-H, Amouyel P, Connell J, de Mutsert R, Doney ASF, Farrall M, Menni C, Morris AD, Noordam R, Pare G, Poulter NR, Shields DC, Stanton A, Thom S, Abecasis G, Amin N, Arking DE, Ayers KL, Barbieri CM, Batini C, Bis JC, Blake T, Bochud M, Boehnke M, Boerwinkle E, Boomsma DI, Bottinger EP, Braund PS, Brumat M, Campbell A, Campbell H, Chakravarti A, Chambers JC, Chauhan G, Ciullo M, Cocca M, Collins F, Cordell HJ, Davies G, de Borst MH, de Geus EJ, Deary IJ, Deelen J, Del Greco FM, Demirkale CY, Dorr M, Ehret GB, Elosua R, Enroth S, Erzurumluoglu AM, Ferreira T, Franberg M, Franco OH, Gandin I, Gasparini P, Giedraitis V, Gieger C, Girotto G, Goel A, Gow AJ, Gudnason V, Guo X, Gyllensten U, Hamsten A, Harris TB, Harris SE, Hartman CA, Havulinna AS, Hicks AA, Hofer E, Hofman A, Hottenga J-J, Huffman JE, Hwang S-J, Ingelsson E, James A, Jansen R, Jarvelin M-R, Joehanes R, Johansson A, Johnson AD, Joshi PK, Jousilahti P, Jukema JW, Jula A, Kahonen M, Kathiresan S, Keavney BD, Khaw K-T, Knekt P, Knight J, Kolcic I, Kooner JS, Koskinen S, Kristiansson K, Kutalik Z, Laan M, Larson M, Launer LJ, Lehne B, Lehtimaki T, Liewald DCM, Lin L, Lind L, Lindgren CM, Liu Y, Loos RJF, Lopez LM, Lu Y, Lyytikainen L-P, Mahajan A, Mamasoula C, Marrugat J, Marten J, Milaneschi Y, Morgan A, Morris AP, Morrison AC, Munson PJ, Nalls MA, Nandakumar P, Nelson CP, Niiranen T, Nolte IM, Nutile T, Oldehinkel AJ, Oostra BA, O'Reilly PF, Org E, Padmanabhan S, Palmas W, Palotie A, Pattie A, Penninx BWJH, Perolet al., 2018, Genetic analysis of over 1 million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits (vol 50, pg 1412, 2018), NATURE GENETICS, Vol: 50, Pages: 1755-1755, ISSN: 1061-4036

Journal article

Ashar FN, Mitchell RN, Albert CM, Newton-Cheh C, Brody JA, Mueller-Nurasyid M, Moes A, Meitinger T, Mak A, Huikuri H, Junttila MJ, Goyette P, Pulit SL, Pazoki R, Tanck M, Blom MT, Zhao X, Havulinna AS, Jabbari R, Glinge C, Tragante V, Escher SA, Chakravarti A, Ehret G, Coresh J, Li M, Prineas RJ, Franco OH, Kwok P-Y, Lumley T, Dumas F, McKnight B, Rotter JI, Lemaitre RN, Heckbert SR, O'Donnell CJ, Hwang S-J, Tardif J-C, VanDenburgh M, Uitterlinden AG, Hofman A, Stricker BHC, de Bakker PIW, Franks PW, Jansson J-H, Asselbergs FW, Halushka MK, Maleszewski JJ, Tfelt-Hansen J, Engstrom T, Salomaa V, Virmani R, Kolodgie F, Wilde AAM, Tan HL, Bezzina CR, Eijgelsheim M, Rioux JD, Jouven X, Kaeaeb S, Psaty BM, Siscovick DS, Arking DE, Sotoodehnia Net al., 2018, A comprehensive evaluation of the genetic architecture of sudden cardiac arrest, EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Vol: 39, Pages: 3961-+, ISSN: 0195-668X

Journal article

Evangelou E, Warren HR, Mosen-Ansorena D, Mifsud B, Pazoki R, Gao H, Ntritsos G, Dimou N, Cabrera CP, Karaman I, Fu LN, Evangelou M, Witkowska K, Tzanis E, Hellwege JN, Giri A, Edwards DRV, Sun YV, Cho K, Gaziano JM, Wilson PWF, Tsao PS, Kovesdy CP, Esko T, Magi R, Milani L, Almgren P, Boutin T, Debette S, Ding J, Giulianini F, Holliday EG, Jackson AU, Li-Gao R, Lin W-Y, Luan J, Mangino M, Oldmeadow C, Prins BP, Qian Y, Sargurupremraj M, Shah N, Surendran P, Theriault S, Verweij N, Willems SM, Zhao J-H, Amouyel P, Connell J, de Mutsert R, Doney ASF, Farrall M, Menni C, Morris AD, Noordam R, Pare G, Poulter NR, Shields DC, Stanton A, Thom S, Abecasis G, Amin N, Arking DE, Ayers KL, Barbieri CM, Batini C, Bis JC, Blake T, Bochud M, Boehnke M, Boerwinkle E, Boomsma DI, Bottinger EP, Braund PS, Brumat M, Campbell A, Campbell H, Chakravarti A, Chambers JC, Chauhan G, Ciullo M, Cocca M, Collins F, Cordell HJ, Davies G, de Borst MH, de Geus EJ, Deary IJ, Deelen J, Del Greco FM, Demirkale CY, Dorr M, Ehret GB, Elosua R, Enroth S, Erzurumluoglu AM, Ferreira T, Franberg M, Franco OH, Gandin I, Gasparini P, Giedraitis V, Gieger C, Girotto G, Goel A, Gow AJ, Gudnason V, Guo X, Gyllensten U, Hamsten A, Harris TB, Harris SE, Hartman CA, Havulinna AS, Hicks AA, Hofer E, Hofman A, Hottenga J-J, Huffman JE, Hwang S-J, Ingelsson E, James A, Jansen R, Jarvelin M-R, Joehanes R, Johansson A, Johnson AD, Joshi PK, Jousilahti P, Jukema JW, Jula A, Kahonen M, Kathiresan S, Keavney BD, Khaw K-T, Knekt P, Knight J, Kolcic I, Kooner JS, Koskinen S, Kristiansson K, Kutalik Z, Laan M, Larson M, Launer LJ, Lehne B, Lehtimaki T, Liewald DCM, Lin L, Lind L, Lindgren CM, Liu Y, Loos RJF, Lopez LM, Lu Y, Lyytikainen L-P, Mahajan A, Mamasoula C, Marrugat J, Marten J, Milaneschi Y, Morgan A, Morris AP, Morrison AC, Munson PJ, Nalls MA, Nandakumar P, Nelson CP, Niiranen T, Nolte IM, Nutile T, Oldehinkel AJ, Oostra BA, O'Reilly PF, Org E, Padmanabhan S, Palmas W, Palotie A, Pattie A, Penninx BWJH, Perolet al., 2018, Publisher correction: Genetic analysis of over 1 million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits, Nature Genetics, Vol: 50, Pages: 1755-1755, ISSN: 1061-4036

Correction to: Nature Genetics https://doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0205-x, published online 17 September 2018.

Journal article

Iotchkova V, Huang J, Morris JA, Jain D, Barbieri C, Walter K, Min JL, Chen L, Astle W, Cocca M, Deelen P, Elding H, Farmaki A-E, Franklin CS, Franberg M, Gaunt TR, Hofman A, Jiang T, Kleber ME, Lachance G, Luan J, Malerba G, Matchan A, Mead D, Memari Y, Ntalla I, Panoutsopoulou K, Pazoki R, Perry JRB, Rivadeneira F, Sabater-Lleal M, Sennblad B, Shin S-Y, Southam L, Traglia M, van Dijk F, van Leeuwen EM, Zaza G, Zhang W, Amin N, Butterworth A, Chambers JC, Dedoussis G, Dehghan A, Franco OH, Franke L, Frontini M, Gambaro G, Gasparini P, Hamsten A, Isaacs A, Kooner JS, Kooperberg C, Langenberg C, Marz W, Scott RA, Swertz MA, Toniolo D, Uitterlinden AG, van Duijn CM, Watkins H, Zeggini E, Maurano MT, Timpson NJ, Reiner AP, Auer PL, Soranzo Net al., 2018, Author Correction: Discovery and refinement of genetic loci associated with cardiometabolic risk using dense imputation maps, Nature Genetics, Vol: 50, Pages: 1752-1752, ISSN: 1061-4036

Correction to: Nature Genetics https://doi.org/10.1038/ng.3668, published online 26 September 2016.In the version of the article published, the surname of author Aaron Isaacs is misspelled as Issacs.

Journal article

Evangelou E, Gao H, Chu C, Ntritsos G, Blakeley P, Butts A, Pazoki R, Suzuki H, Koskeridis F, Yiorkas A, Karaman I, Elliott J, Aeschbacher S, Bartz T, Baumeister S, Braund P, Brown M, Brody J, Clarke T-K, Dimou N, Faul J, Homuth G, Jackson A, Kentistou K, Joshi P, Lemaitre R, Lind P, Lyytikäinen L-P, Mangino M, Milaneschi Y, Nelson C, Nolte I, Perälä M-M, Polasek O, Porteous D, Ratliff S, Smith J, Stančáková A, Teumer A, Tuominen S, Thériault S, Vangipurapu J, Whitfield J, Wood A, Yao J, Yu B, Zhao W, Arking D, Auvinen J, Liu C, Männikkö M, Risch L, Rotter J, Snieder H, Veijola J, Blakemore A, Boehnke M, Campbell H, Conen D, Eriksson J, Grabe H, Guo X, Harst PVD, Hartman C, Hayward C, Heath A, Jarvelin M-R, Kähönen M, Kardia SLR, Kühne M, Kuusisto J, Laakso M, Lahti J, Lehtimäki T, McIntosh A, Mohlke K, Morrison A, Martin N, Oldehinkel A, Penninx BWJH, Psaty B, Raitakari O, Rudan I, Samani N, Scott L, Spector T, Verweij N, Weir D, Wilson J, Levy D, Tzoulaki I, Bell J, Matthews P, Rothenfluh A, Desrivières S, Schumann G, Elliott Pet al., 2018, Genome-wide association and functional studies identify 46 novel loci for alcohol consumption and suggest common genetic mechanisms with neuropsychiatric disorders, bioRxiv The preprint server for biology

Abstract Excessive alcohol consumption is one of the main causes of death and disability worldwide. Alcohol consumption is a heritable complex trait. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of alcohol use in ~480,000 people of European descent to decipher the genetic architecture of alcohol intake. We identified 46 novel, common loci, and investigated their potential functional significance using magnetic resonance imaging data, gene expression and behavioral studies in Drosophila . Our results identify new genetic pathways associated with alcohol consumption and suggest common genetic mechanisms with several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia.

Journal article

Robinson O, Hyam MC, Karaman I, Pinto RC, Fiorito G, Gao H, Heard A, Jarvelin M-R, Lewis M, Pazoki R, Polidoro S, Tzoulaki I, Wielscher M, Elliott P, Vineis Pet al., 2018, Determinants of accelerated metabolomic and epigenetic ageing in a UK cohort, Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Markers of biological ageing have potential utility in primary care and public health. We developed an elastic net regression model of age based on untargeted metabolic profiling across multiple platforms, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in urine and serum (almost 100,000 features assayed), within a large sample (N=2,239) from the UK occupational Airwave cohort. We investigated the determinants of accelerated ageing, including genetic, lifestyle and psychological risk factors for premature mortality. The metabolomic age model was well correlated with chronological age (r=0.85 in independent test set). Increased metabolomic age acceleration (mAA) was associated (p&lt;0.0025) with overweight/obesity and depression and nominally associated (p&lt;0.05) with high alcohol use and low income. DNA methylation age acceleration (N=1,102) was nominally associated (p&lt;0.05) with high alcohol use, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, but not correlated with mAA. Biological age acceleration may present an important mechanism linking psycho-social stress to age-related disease.</jats:p>

Working paper

Evangelou E, Warren HR, Mosen-Ansorena D, Mifsud B, Pazoki R, Gao H, Ntritsos G, Dimou N, Cabrera CP, Karaman I, Fu LN, Evangelou M, Witkowska K, Tzanis E, Hellwege JN, Giri A, Edwards DRV, Sun YV, Cho K, Gaziano JM, Wilson PWF, Tsao PS, Kovesdy CP, Esko T, Magi R, Milani L, Almgren P, Boutin T, Debette S, Ding J, Giulianini F, Holliday EG, Jackson AU, Li-Gao R, Lin W-Y, Luan J, Mangino M, Oldmeadow C, Prins BP, Qian Y, Sargurupremraj M, Shah N, Surendran P, Theriault S, Verweij N, Willems SM, Zhao J-H, Amouyel P, Connell J, de Mutsert R, Doney ASF, Farrall M, Menni C, Morris AD, Noordam R, Pare G, Poulter NR, Shields DC, Stanton A, Thom S, Abecasis G, Amin N, Arking DE, Ayers KL, Barbieri CM, Batini C, Bis JC, Blake T, Bochud M, Boehnke M, Boerwinkle E, Boomsma DI, Bottinger EP, Braund PS, Brumat M, Campbell A, Campbell H, Chakravarti A, Chambers JC, Chauhan G, Ciullo M, Cocca M, Collins F, Cordell HJ, Davies G, de Borst MH, de Geus EJ, Deary IJ, Deelen J, Del Greco FM, Demirkale CY, Dorr M, Ehret GB, Elosua R, Enroth S, Erzurumluoglu AM, Ferreira T, Franberg M, Franco OH, Gandin I, Gasparini P, Giedraitis V, Gieger C, Girotto G, Goel A, Gow AJ, Gudnason V, Guo X, Gyllensten U, Hamsten A, Harris TB, Harris SE, Hartman CA, Havulinna AS, Hicks AA, Hofer E, Hofman A, Hottenga J-J, Huffman JE, Hwang S-J, Ingelsson E, James A, Jansen R, Jarvelin M-R, Joehanes R, Johansson A, Johnson AD, Joshi PK, Jousilahti P, Jukema JW, Jula A, Kahonen M, Kathiresan S, Keavney BD, Khaw K-T, Knekt P, Knight J, Kolcic I, Kooner JS, Koskinen S, Kristiansson K, Kutalik Z, Laan M, Larson M, Launer LJ, Lehne B, Lehtimaki T, Liewald DCM, Lin L, Lind L, Lindgren CM, Liu Y, Loos RJF, Lopez LM, Lu Y, Lyytikainen L-P, Mahajan A, Mamasoula C, Marrugat J, Marten J, Milaneschi Y, Morgan A, Morris AP, Morrison AC, Munson PJ, Nalls MA, Nandakumar P, Nelson CP, Niiranen T, Nolte IM, Nutile T, Oldehinkel AJ, Oostra BA, O'Reilly PF, Org E, Padmanabhan S, Palmas W, Palotie A, Pattie A, Penninx BWJH, Perolet al., 2018, Genetic analysis of over one million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits, Nature Genetics, Vol: 50, Pages: 1412-1425, ISSN: 1061-4036

High blood pressure is a highly heritable and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We report the largest genetic association study of blood pressure traits (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) to date in over 1 million people of European ancestry. We identify 535 novel blood pressure loci that not only offer new biological insights into blood pressure regulation but also highlight shared genetic architecture between blood pressure and lifestyle exposures. Our findings identify new biological pathways for blood pressure regulation with potential for improved cardiovascular disease prevention in the future.

Journal article

Davies G, Lam M, Harris SE, Trampush JW, Luciano M, Hill WD, Hagenaars SP, Ritchie SJ, Marioni RE, Fawns-Ritchie C, Liewald DCM, Okely JA, Ahola-Olli AV, Barnes CLK, Bertram L, Bis JC, Burdick KE, Christoforou A, DeRosse P, Djurovic S, Espeseth T, Giakoumaki S, Giddaluru S, Gustavson DE, Hayward C, Hofer E, Ikram MA, Karlsson R, Knowles E, Lahti J, Leber M, Li S, Mather KA, Melle I, Morris D, Oldmeadow C, Palviainen T, Payton A, Pazoki R, Petrovic K, Reynolds CA, Sargurupremraj M, Scholz M, Smith JA, Smith AV, Terzikhan N, Thalamuthu A, Trompet S, van der Lee SJ, Ware EB, Windham BG, Wright MJ, Yang J, Yu J, Ames D, Amin N, Amouyel P, Andreassen OA, Armstrong NJ, Assareh AA, Attia JR, Attix D, Avramopoulos D, Bennett DA, Boehmer AC, Boyle PA, Brodaty H, Campbell H, Cannon TD, Cirulli ET, Congdon E, Conley ED, Corley J, Cox SR, Dale AM, Dehghan A, Dick D, Dickinson D, Eriksson JG, Evangelou E, Faul JD, Ford I, Freimer NA, Gao H, Giegling I, Gillespie NA, Gordon SD, Gottesman RF, Griswold ME, Gudnason V, Harris TB, Hartmann AM, Hatzimanolis A, Heiss G, Holliday EG, Joshi PK, Kahonen M, Kardia SLR, Karlsson I, Kleineidam L, Knopman DS, Kochan NA, Konte B, Kwok JB, Le Hellard S, Lee T, Lehtimaki T, Li S-C, Liu T, Koini M, London E, Longstreth WT, Lopez OL, Loukola A, Luck T, Lundervold AJ, Lundquist A, Lyytikainen L-P, Martin NG, Montgomery GW, Murray AD, Need AC, Noordam R, Nyberg L, Ollier W, Papenberg G, Pattie A, Polasek O, Poldrack RA, Psaty BM, Reppermund S, Riedel-Heller SG, Rose RJ, Rotter JI, Roussos P, Rovio SP, Saba Y, Sabb FW, Sachdev PS, Satizabal CL, Schmid M, Scott RJ, Scult MA, Simino J, Slagboom PE, Smyrnis N, Soumare A, Stefanis NC, Stott DJ, Straub RE, Sundet K, Taylor AM, Taylor KD, Tzoulaki I, Tzourio C, Uitterlinden A, Vitart V, Voineskos AN, Kaprio J, Wagner M, Wagner H, Weinhold L, Wen KH, Widen E, Yang Q, Zhao W, Adams HHH, Arking DE, Bilder RM, Bitsios P, Boerwinkle E, Chiba-Falek O, Corvin A, De Jager PL, Debette S, Donohoe G, Elliott P, Fitzpet al., 2018, Study of 300,486 individuals identifies 148 independent genetic loci influencing general cognitive function, Nature Communications, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2041-1723

General cognitive function is a prominent and relatively stable human trait that is associated with many important life outcomes. We combine cognitive and genetic data from the CHARGE and COGENT consortia, and UK Biobank (total N = 300,486; age 16–102) and find 148 genome-wide significant independent loci (P < 5 × 10−8) associated with general cognitive function. Within the novel genetic loci are variants associated with neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, physical and psychiatric illnesses, and brain structure. Gene-based analyses find 709 genes associated with general cognitive function. Expression levels across the cortex are associated with general cognitive function. Using polygenic scores, up to 4.3% of variance in general cognitive function is predicted in independent samples. We detect significant genetic overlap between general cognitive function, reaction time, and many health variables including eyesight, hypertension, and longevity. In conclusion we identify novel genetic loci and pathways contributing to the heritability of general cognitive function.

Journal article

Schmidt AF, Holmes MV, Preiss D, Swerdlow D, Denaxas S, Fatemifar G, Faraway R, Finan C, Lumbers T, Henry A, Valentine D, Fairhurst-Hunter Z, Hartwig FP, Horta BL, Hypponen E, Power C, Moldovan M, van Iperen E, Hovingh K, Demuth I, Norman K, Steinhagen-Thiessen E, Demuth J, Bertram L, Lill CM, Coassin S, Willeit J, Kiechl S, Willeit K, Mason D, Wright J, Morris R, Wanamethee G, Whincup P, Ben-Shlomo Y, McLachlan S, Price JF, Kivimaki M, Welch C, Sanchez-Galvez A, Marques-Vidal P, Nicolaides A, Panayiotou AG, Onland-Moret NC, van der Schouw YT, Matullo G, Fiorito G, Guarrera S, Sacerdote C, Wareham NJ, Langenberg C, Scott RA, Luan J, Bobak M, Malyutina S, Pajak A, Kubinova R, Tamosiunas A, Pikhart H, Grarup N, Pedersen O, Hansen T, Linneberg A, Jess T, Cooper J, Humphries SE, Brilliant M, Kitchner T, Hakonarson H, Carrell DS, McCarty CA, Lester KH, Larson EB, Crosslin DR, Andrade MD, Roden DM, Denny JC, Carty C, Hancock S, Attia J, Holliday E, Scott R, Schofield P, ODonnell M, Yusuf S, Chong M, Pare G, van der Harst P, Said MA, Eppinga RN, Verweij N, Snieder H, Christen T, Mook-Kanamori DO, Gustafsson S, Lind L, Ingelsson E, Pazoki R, Franco O, Hofman A, Uitterlinden A, Dehghan A, Teumer A, Baumeister S, Dörr M, Lerch MM, Völker U, Völzke H, Ward J, Pell JP, Meade T, Christophersen IE, Maitland-van der Zee AH, Baranova EV, Young R, Ford I, Campbell A, Padmanabhan S, Bots ML, Grobbee DE, Froguel P, Thuillier D, Roussel R, Bonnefond A, Cariou B, Smart M, Bao Y, Kumari M, Mahajan A, Hopewell JC, Seshadri S, Dale C, Costa RPE, Ridker PM, Chasman DI, Reiner AP, Ritchie MD, Lange LA, Cornish AJ, Dobbins SE, Hemminki K, Kinnersley B, Sanson M, Labreche K, Simon M, Bondy M, Law P, Speedy H, Allan J, Li N, Went M, Weinhold N, Morgan G, Sonneveld P, Nilsson B, Goldschmidt H, Hemminki K, Sud A, Engert A, Hansson M, Hemingway H, Asselbergs FW, Patel RS, Keating BJ, Sattar N, Houlston R, Casas JP, Hingorani ADet al., 2018, Phenome-wide association analysis of LDL-cholesterol lowering genetic variants in <i>PCSK9</i>

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p>We characterised the phenotypic consequence of genetic variation at the <jats:italic>PCSK9</jats:italic> locus and compared findings with recent trials of pharmacological inhibitors of PCSK9.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>Published and individual participant level data (300,000+ participants) were combined to construct a weighted <jats:italic>PCSK9</jats:italic> gene-centric score (GS). Fourteen randomized placebo controlled PCSK9 inhibitor trials were included, providing data on 79,578 participants. Results were scaled to a one mmol/L lower LDL-C concentration</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>The <jats:italic>PCSK9</jats:italic> GS (comprising 4 SNPs) associations with plasma lipid and apolipoprotein levels were consistent in direction with treatment effects. The GS odds ratio (OR) for myocardial infarction (MI) was 0.53 (95%CI 0.42; 0.68), compared to a PCSK9 inhibitor effect of 0.90 (95%CI 0.86; 0.93). For ischemic stroke ORs were 0.84 (95%CI 0.57; 1.22) for the GS, compared to 0.85 (95%CI 0.78; 0.93) in the drug trials. ORs with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were 1.29 (95% CI 1.11; 1.50) for the GS, as compared to 1.00 (95%CI 0.96; 1.04) for incident T2DM in PCSK9 inhibitor trials. No genetic associations were observed for cancer, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or Alzheimer’s disease – outcomes for which large-scale trial data were unavailable.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>Genetic variation at the <jats:italic>PCSK9</jats:italic> locus recapitulates the effects of therapeutic inhibition of PCSK9 on major blood lipid

Journal article

Pazoki R, Dehghan A, Evangelou E, Warren H, Gao H, Caulfield M, Elliott P, Tzoulaki Iet al., 2018, Genetic predisposition to high blood pressure and lifestyle factors. Associations with midlife blood pressure levels and cardiovascular events, Circulation, Vol: 137, Pages: 653-661, ISSN: 0009-7322

Background:High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Both heritable and lifestyle risk factors contribute to elevated BP levels. We aimed to investigate the extent to which lifestyle factors could offset the effect of an adverse BP genetic profile and its effect on CVD risk.Methods:We constructed a genetic risk score for high BP by using 314 published BP loci in 277 005 individuals without previous CVD from the UK Biobank study, a prospective cohort of individuals aged 40 to 69 years, with a median of 6.11 years of follow-up. We scored participants according to their lifestyle factors including body mass index, healthy diet, sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption, smoking, and urinary sodium excretion levels measured at recruitment. We examined the association between tertiles of genetic risk and tertiles of lifestyle score with BP levels and incident CVD by using linear regression and Cox regression models, respectively.Results:Healthy lifestyle score was strongly associated with BP (P<10–320) for systolic and diastolic BP and CVD events regardless of the underlying BP genetic risk. Participants with a favorable in comparison with an unfavorable lifestyle (bottom versus top tertile lifestyle score) had 4.9, 4.3, and 4.1 mm Hg lower systolic BP in low, middle, and high genetic risk groups, respectively (P for interaction=0.0006). Similarly, favorable in comparison with unfavorable lifestyle showed 30%, 33%, and 31% lower risk of CVD among participants in low, middle, and high genetic risk groups, respectively (P for interaction=0.99).Conclusions:Our data further support population-wide efforts to lower BP in the population via lifestyle modification. The advantages and disadvantages of disclosing genetic predisposition to high BP for risk stratification needs careful evaluation.

Journal article

Pazoki R, 2018, Methods for Polygenic Traits., Pages: 145-156

An important aspect of public health is disease prediction and health promotion through better targeting of preventive strategies. Well-targeted preventive strategies will eventually decrease burden of diseases and thus precise prediction plays a crucial role in public health. Many investigators put efforts into finding models that improve prediction using known risk factors of diseases. Recently with the overwhelming load of genetic loci discovered for complex diseases through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), much of attention has been focused on the role of these genetic loci to improve prediction models. Genetic loci in solo explain little variance of diseases. It is thus necessary to create new genetic parameters that combine the effect of as many genetic loci as possible. Such new parameters aim to better distinguish individuals who will develop a disease from those who will not. In this chapter, various polygenic methods that use multiple genetic loci to directly or indirectly improve precision of genetic prediction are discussed.

Book chapter

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