Imperial College London

Richard Anderson

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Managing Director RTSC
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6092richard.anderson Website CV

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Alexandra Williams +44 (0)20 7594 5995

 
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Location

 

612Skempton BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

33 results found

Singh R, Graham DJ, Horcher D, Anderson RJet al., 2020, Decomposing journey time variance on urban metro systems via semiparametric mixed methods, Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, Vol: 114, Pages: 140-163, ISSN: 0968-090X

The availability of automated data for urban metro systems allows operators to accurately measure journey time reliability. However, there remains limited understanding of the causes of journey time variance and how journey time performance can be improved. In this paper, we present a semiparametric regression modelling framework to determine the underlying drivers of journey time variance in urban metro systems, using the London Underground as a case study. We merge train location and passenger trip data to decompose total journey times into three constituent parts: access times as passengers enter the system, on-train times, and egress times as passengers exit at their destinations. For each journey time component, we estimate non-linear functional relationships which we then use to derive elasticity estimates of journey times with respect to service supply and demand factors, including operational and physical characteristics of metros as well as passenger demand and passenger-specific travel characteristics. We find that the static fixed physical characteristics of stations and routes have the greatest influence on journey time, followed by train speeds, and headways, for which the average elasticities of total journey time are −0.54 and 0.05, respectively. The results of our analysis could inform operators about where potential interventions should be targeted in order to improve journey time performance.

Journal article

Morse L, Trompet M, Barron A, Anderson R, Graham Det al., 2020, A benchmarking framework for understanding bus performance in the U.S., Benchmarking: an international journal, Vol: 27, Pages: 1533-1550, ISSN: 1463-5771

Purpose This paper describes a benchmarking framework applied to medium-sized urban public bus agencies in the United States which has overcome the challenges of data quality, comparability and understanding.Design/methodology/approach The benchmarking methodology described in this paper is based on lessons learned through seven years of development of a fixed route key performance indicator (KPI) system for the American Bus Benchmarking Group (ABBG). Founded in 2011, the ABBG is a group of public medium-sized urban bus agencies that compare performance and share best practices with peers throughout the United States. The methodology is adapted from the process used within international benchmarking groups facilitated by Imperial College and consists of four main elements: peer selection, KPI system development, processes to achieve high-quality data, and processes to understand relative performance and change.Findings The four main elements of the ABBG benchmarking methodology consist of eighteen sub-elements, which when applied overcome three main benchmarking challenges; comparability, data quality, and understanding. While serving as examples for the methodology elements, the paper provides specific insights into service characteristics and performance among ABBG agencies.Research limitations/implications The benchmarking approach described in this paper requires time and commitment and thus is most suitably applied to a concise group of agencies. Practical implications This methodology provides transit agencies, authorities and benchmarking practitioners a framework for effective benchmarking. It will lead to high-quality comparable data and a strong understanding of the performance context to serve as a basis for organizational changes, whether for policy, planning, operations, stakeholder communication, or program development. Originality/value The methodology, while consistent with recommendations from literature, is unique in its scale, in-depth validation

Journal article

Singh R, Graham DJ, Anderson RJ, 2019, Characterizing journey time performance on urban metro systems under varying operating conditions, Transportation Research Record, Vol: 2673, Pages: 516-528, ISSN: 0361-1981

Automated fare collection (AFC) data provide opportunities for improved measurement of public transport service quality from the passenger perspective. In this paper, AFC data from the London Underground are used to measure service quality through an analysis of journey time performance under regular and incident-affected operating conditions. The analysis involves two parts: (i) parametrically defining the shape of journey time distributions, and (ii) defining three performance metrics based on the moments of the distributions to measure the mean and variance of journey times. The metrics show that mean journey times are longest during the afternoon peak across all lines analyzed, and are more variable during the afternoon and off-peak periods depending on the line. Under incident conditions, mean journey times range from 8% to 39% longer compared with regular conditions, depending on the line. Overall, the main application of this work is that the metrics presented here can be directly applied by operators to quantify customer journey time performance, and can be further extended for industry-wide application to compare performance across metro networks.There has been increasing recognition in the transport industry of the need for performance metrics that capture journey time reliability from a passenger perspective as opposed to the traditional operator-oriented indicators. In a report for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on service quality metrics used by metro operators, it is noted that the three most commonly reported metrics relating to journey time are train delay, wait times, and passenger journeys on-time (1). The first two metrics capture train performance from a schedule and headway adherence point of view. The third attempts to capture the experience of the user; however, it is recognized that operator-oriented indicators are rarely able to measure the true impact of passenger delay (2).The journey time distribution on

Journal article

Canavan S, Barron A, Cohen J, Graham DJ, Anderson RJet al., 2019, Best Practices in Operating High Frequency Metro Services, Transportation Research Record, ISSN: 0361-1981

© National Academy of Sciences: Transportation Research Board 2019. Most metro rail systems worldwide are facing increasing demand and the need to deliver additional capacity in key corridors. Although total capacity reflects the combination of train capacity and frequency, increasing frequency is the primary strategy to increase capacity on existing lines where infrastructure is fixed. Higher frequencies also increase efficiency, by attracting more passengers and making existing journeys faster, thereby making better use of expensive rail infrastructure and increasing both metro revenues and wider economics benefits to the cities they serve. This paper is based on a study conducted for the Community of Metros, a worldwide group of metro systems, which surveyed 17 high frequency lines. The paper first documents the characteristics of high frequency lines [with 25 trains per hour (tph) or more defined as “high frequency” and 30 tph or more as “very high frequency”] and presents the various constraints to higher frequency operations, including how they interact and the various possible solutions. Five main categories of constraints were identified, relating to signaling and train control, station and train crowding, fleet, terminal turnarounds, and service complexity. To achieve the highest frequencies, it is essential for metro systems to take a holistic approach and identify not only the immediate constraints but also secondary and tertiary constraints that may prevent the full benefits of improvements from being realized. This paper provides guidance to those operating, funding, planning, and designing metro systems in how to maximize frequency and thereby deliver greater benefits to riders, transit agencies, and stakeholders.

Journal article

Anupriya A, Graham D, Anderson R, Carbo JMet al., 2018, Cost Function for Urban Rail Transport Systems, Transportation Research Board 98th Annual Meeting

Conference paper

Barron A, Canavan S, Cohen J, Anderson Ret al., 2018, Operational impacts of platform doors in metros, Transportation Research Record, Vol: 2672, Pages: 266-274, ISSN: 0361-1981

Platform doors are increasingly installed by metros, primarily to improve safety. However, they have the potential for both positive and negative operational impacts, mostly by affecting dwell times at stations. Using data from the CoMET and Nova international metro benchmarking consortia of 33 metro systems, this paper seeks to understand and quantify these operational impacts. Overall, platform doors have a net negative impact on dwell times, leading to between 4 and 15 seconds of extra time per station stop. This is due to additional time for the larger doors to open and close slower passenger movements due to the additional distance between platforms and trains and, most importantly, extended departure delays after both sets of doors are closed caused by the need to ensure safety (that no one is trapped in the gap between the two sets of doors). This is a particular problem in mainland China, where metros conduct manual safety checks that require drivers to step out of trains onto platforms. However, despite longer dwell times, platform doors have a net positive impact on metro operations, largely due to the many safety benefits that also reduce delays and thereby improve service performance. There are also potential benefits regarding energy and ventilation. To mitigate the negative impacts, metros should seek to refine procedures and improve technology to reduce dwell time delays caused by platform doors. Reducing or eliminating these extra delays are essential to delivering efficient service and maximum capacity, provided that safety can be assured.

Journal article

Canavan S, Graham D, Anderson R, Barron Aet al., 2018, Urban metro rail demand: evidence from dynamic generalised method of moments (GMM) estimates using panel data, Transportation Research Record, Vol: 2672, Pages: 288-296, ISSN: 0361-1981

This paper estimates elasticities of demand for metro service with respect to fares, income, quality of service, population and network length. Data for 32 world metro systems covering the period from 1996 to 2015 are analysed within a dynamic panel data specification. Three key contributions are made. First, we collate a database for estimation that is more extensive than that used in previous studies. Second, the quality of the data we have available allows us to more accurately represent quality of service than has been possible previously. And lastly, we estimate and compare two different measures of demand. Our analysis finds a statistically significant negative fare elasticity of -0.25 in the long run for a passenger km specified model and -0.4 in the long run for a passenger journeys specified model, and a positive long run income elasticity of 0.17 and 0.18 for the passenger km and passenger journey models respectively. Regarding quality of service we find positive long run elasticities of 0.56 and 0.47 for the passenger km and passenger journey models respectively. Income levels, population and the size of the network are also found to be statistically significant and positive in nature. The results suggest passenger km and passenger journeys will increase more in response to changes in service (here represented by increased capacity) than to changes in fares, with the difference in elasticities of service and fares being more pronounced for passenger km.

Journal article

Trompet M, Anderson RJ, Graham DJ, 2018, Improved understanding of the relative quality of bus public transit using a balanced approach to performance data normalization, Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Vol: 114, Pages: 13-23, ISSN: 0965-8564

In order for bus operators and/or their respective authorities to understand where service quality can improve, it is useful to systematically compare performance with organizations displaying similarities in types of services offered, operational characteristics and density of the service area. These similar characteristics enable peer organizations to benchmark performance once their operational data are normalized for differences in scale of operations. The most commonly used normalization factors for the demand side output are passenger boardings and passenger kilometres. For the supply side output these are vehicle kilometres and vehicle hours. Through twelve years of experience in the International Bus Benchmarking Group (IBBG) a better understanding of differences in service characteristics between ‘similar’ peers has been achieved, which highlight a challenge for the interpretation of normalized performance. It became clear that relative performance should often not be concluded from performance indicators normalized in a single dimension. Variety between peers in commercial speed, trip length, vehicle planning capacity, vehicle weight and network efficiency result in the need for a bi-dimensional or balanced approach to data normalization. This paper quantifies the variety within these operational characteristics and provides examples of the interpretation bias this may lead to. A framework is provided for use by bus organization management, policymakers and benchmarking practitioners that suggests applicable combinations of denominators for a balanced normalization process, leading to improved understanding of relative performance.

Journal article

Anupriya A, Graham D, Horcher D, Anderson Ret al., 2018, The impact of early bird scheme on commuter trip scheduling in Hong Kong: a causal analysis using travel card data, Transportation Research Board 97th Annual MeetingTransportation Research Board

Conference paper

Horcher D, Graham DJ, Anderson RJ, 2017, The economics of seat provision in public transport, Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Vol: 109, Pages: 277-292, ISSN: 1366-5545

Seated and standing travelling imply significantly different experience for public transport users. This paper investigates with analytical modelling and numerical simulations how the optimal seat supply depends on demand and supply characteristics. The paper explores the implications of seat provision on the marginal cost of travelling as well. In crowded conditions, we distinguish two types of external costs: crowding density and seat occupancy externalities. We derive, using a realistic smart card dataset, the externality pattern of a metro line, and identify the distorting role of the occupancy externality that makes the welfare maximising fare disproportionate to the density of crowding.

Journal article

Horcher D, Graham DJ, Anderson RJ, 2017, The economic inefficiency of travel passes under crowding externalities and endogenous capacity, Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, ISSN: 0022-5258

Journal article

Horcher D, Graham DJ, Anderson RJ, 2017, Crowding cost estimation with large scale smart card and vehicle location data, Transportation Research Part B: Methodological: an international journal, Vol: 95, Pages: 105-125, ISSN: 0191-2615

Crowding discomfort is an external cost of public transport trips imposed on fellow passengers that has to be measured in order to derive optimal supply-side decisions. This paper presents a comprehensive method to estimate the user cost of crowding in terms of the equivalent travel time loss, in a revealed preference route choice framework. Using automated demand and train location data we control for fluctuations in crowding conditions on the entire length of a metro journey, including variations in the density of standing passengers and the probability of finding a seat. The estimated standing penalty is 26.5% of the uncrowded value of in-vehicle travel time. An additional passenger per square metre on average adds 11.9% to the travel time multiplier. These results are in line with earlier revealed preference values, and suggest that stated choice methods may overestimate the user cost of crowding. As a side-product, and an important input of the route choice analysis, we derive a novel passenger-to-train assignment method to recover the daily crowding and standing probability pattern in the metro network.

Journal article

Cohen JM, Barron AS, Anderson RJ, Graham DJet al., 2016, Impacts of Unattended Train Operations (UTO) on Productivity and Efficiency in Metropolitan Railways, Transportation Research Record-Series, Vol: 2534, Pages: 75-83, ISSN: 0361-1981

Urban metro subway systems (metros) around the world are choosing increasing levels of automation for new and existing lines: the global length of metro lines capable of unattended train operation (UTO) is predicted to triple in the next 10 years. Despite significant investment in this technology, empirical evidence for the financial and service quality impacts of UTO in metros remains scarce. This study used questionnaires and semistructured interviews with the Community of Metros and Nova Group benchmarking groups to assemble emerging evidence of how automation affected costs, staffing, service capacity, and reliability. The results from an analysis of data from 23 lines suggested that UTO could reduce staff numbers by 30% to 70%, with the amount of wage cost reduction depending on whether staff on UTO lines were paid more. On the basis of the experience of seven metros, the capital costs of lines capable of UTO were higher, but the internal rate of return had been estimated by two metros at 10% to 15%. Automated lines were capable of operating at the highest service frequencies of up to 42 trains per hour, and the limited available data suggested that automated lines were more reliable. The findings indicated that UTO was a means to a more flexible and reliable operating model that could increase metro productivity and efficiency. The study identified important work needed to understand the impacts of UTO and identify where statistical analyses would add value once sufficiently large data sets became available.

Journal article

Canavan S, Graham D, Melo P, Anderson R, Barron A, Cohen Jet al., 2016, The Impacts of Moving Block Signalling on Technical Efficiency: An Application of Propensity Score Matching on Urban Metro Rail Systems, Transportation Research Record, Vol: 2534, Pages: 68-74, ISSN: 0361-1981

This study tested the effect of introducing moving-block signaling on the technical efficiency of urban metro rail systems. The study used a panel data set of 27 urban metro systems across 20 countries for 2004 to 2012. When moving-block signaling was considered as a treatment, the effect of the associated benefits on output efficiency levels was able to be measured. Stochastic frontier analysis was employed to estimate technical efficiencies for each metro, and then propensity score matching was applied to evaluate the effect of the type of signaling on technical efficiency. The study allowed the selection of appropriate reference groups and accounted for confounding factors. The study is novel in its provision of empirical evidence of this nature. The results indicate that the technical efficiency of a metro can be improved by 11.5%.

Journal article

Horcher D, Graham DJ, Anderson RJ, 2016, Merging smart card data and train movement data: How to assign trips to trains?, Merging smart card data and train movement data: How to assign trips to trains?

This report explains the assignment method applied to link trips compiled in smart card data to train movements recorded in the signalling system. Particular attention has been paid to (1) origin-destination pairs with multiple potential route options, (2) peak-hour trips delayed by di culties in boarding crowded trains at the origin station, and (3) trips originating or ending on rail lines not included in the train movement dataset.In the current version of this paper the metro network on which the method has been applied is anonymised.

Report

Horcher D, Graham DJ, Anderson R, 2015, The link between crowding pricing and seat supply in public transport, Transportation Research Board 95th Annual Meeting, Washington D.C.

Conference paper

Brage-Ardao R, graham DJ, anderson RJ, 2015, Determinants of Rolling Stock Maintenance Cost in Metros, Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part F -Journal of Rail and Rapid Transit, Vol: 230, Pages: 1487-1495, ISSN: 0954-4097

This study examines the economies of scale and the determinants of rolling stock maintenance costs for 24 urban rail transit operators. The estimates reveal significant returns to scale in maintenance for both per car and per car kilometre. The econometric analysis also provides statistically significant cost elasticities for wages and staff hours, suggesting substitution effects between factors. Staff outsourcing is found to significantly decrease costs, whereas higher levels of fleet availability at the peak and rolling stock failures increase it. The effect of the age of rolling stock and the network is negligible on rolling stock maintenance costs; however, the analysis reveals a downward trend in rolling stock costs among the metros in the CoMET and Nova consortia.

Journal article

Cohen JM, Parasram R, Anderson R, Barron Aet al., 2015, Global trends in metro station organisation and management, 43rd European Transport Conference

Increased uptake of smart ticketing, mass availability of personal information technology,and roll-out of 4G and WiFi coverage within metropolitan railway systems, are leadingmetros to change the way they manage stations.

Conference paper

Cohen JM, Barron A, Anderson R, Graham Det al., 2015, Increased likelihood of injury as a form of transport disadvantage for differently abled and elderly travellers: Evidence from urban metro subway systems, 14th International Conference on Mobility and Transport for Elderly and Disabled Persons

Conference paper

Anderson RJ, Brage-Ardao R, Graham DJ, barron Aet al., 2015, Econometric Benchmarking of Metro Operating Costs. Methods and Applications, European Transport Conference 2015

Conference paper

Brage-Ardao R, graham DJ, Anderson RJ, 2015, Determinants of Train Service Costs in Metro Operations, Transportation Research Board 94th Annual Meeting

Journal article

Cohen JM, Barron AS, Anderson RJ, 2014, Human Operational Support on UTO Lines, Publisher: Imperial College London

Metro automation is an increasing trend worldwide. This study investigated the realities of operating automated lines, focused on the following key questions: What staffing levels are used by metros, and what are the pros and consof each approach? Under what circumstances do metros choose to staff all trains on linesthat are capable of unattended operations? What technology is required to enable automated operations? Do the benefits of automation outweigh the additional investment?

Report

Anderson R, Condry B, Findlay N, Brage-Ardao R, Li H, Condry B, Findlay N, Brage-Ardao R, Li Het al., 2013, Measuring and Valuing Convenience and Service Quality: A Review of Global Practices and Challenges from Mass Transit Operators and Railway Industries, International Transport Forum Discussion Papers, No. 2013/16, PCED Publishing, Paris, ISSN: 2223-439X

Journal article

Barron A, Melo PC, Cohen JM, Anderson RJet al., 2013, Passenger-Focused Management Approach to Measurement of Train Delay Impacts, Transportation Research Record, Vol: 2351, Pages: 46-53, ISSN: 0361-1981

Train delay incidents have major effects on transit service reliability and on customer satisfaction. Operators have long focused efforts on preventing such incidents. While this action is important, the fact that all transit operations inevitably face some degree of delay and disruption from incidents means that operators must also dedicate attention to reducing the duration of incidents and the time to restore normal operations after incidents occur. To be able to do this, it is necessary to measure the total impact of incidents on train service and customers. This research uses data from the CoMET and Nova metro benchmarking groups to investigate the ways in which transit operators can better measure the full effects of incidents on train service and customers. The key benefit of such a passenger-focused approach is that it enables transit managers to direct resources for incident response and recovery better, as well as support the case for strategic investments. This research has shown that most operators measure and report only the frequency of incidents. Of the 22 metros interviewed, only two were able to provide detailed data to estimate the number of passengers affected by incidents. It is no coincidence that the only two metros able to provide detailed data are in fact two of the most reliable in the group.

Journal article

Trompet M, Parasram R, Anderson RJ, 2013, Benchmarking Disaggregate Customer Satisfaction Scores Between Bus Operators In Different Cities and Countries

Directly comparing the satisfaction of customers of urban bus operators in different cities and countries is methodologically challenging due to the different surveys used, different sample frames, different response collection methods and the possibility of cultural bias. Nonetheless, due to the importance of customer satisfaction, the members of the International Bus Benchmarking Group started a research project in 2009 to overcome these challenges. The objective was for bus operators to understand the relative performance in meeting their customer’s expectations and to be able to target those areas in which they relatively underperform. Between 2009-2012, eight to ten participating organizations annually posted identical surveys on their website homepages in the same period. This paper describes the survey and data normalization methodology developed within the International Bus Benchmarking Group that provides managers of these organizations with a comparable view of their customer satisfaction. The described methodology has been successfully tested in the bus industry but can also be applied to other industries where there is a wish to benchmark customer satisfaction amongst other national and international peers.

Journal article

Mohammad S, Graham D, Melo P, Anderson Ret al., 2012, A meta-analysis of the impact of Rail Projects on Land and Property values

The literature on land/property values demonstrates large variability in the estimated change in values arising from rail investments. This study conducts a meta-analysis on empirical estimates for 102 observations on the same. The factors that produce significant variations include the type of land use, the type of rail, rail maturity, the distance to stations, the geographical location, accessibility to other modes, methodological characteristics, and whether the impacted area is land or property. On the other hand, we observe that changes in purchase price and rent values are statistically indifferent, that there is no evidence of change in values over time nor due to the location of land/property within the city, and that including property and neighbourhood characteristics in the model do not change values significantly. Publication bias tests are performed and show that although researchers tend to report positive and negative results, they tend to be biased towards significant estimates.

Journal article

Allport RJ, Anderson RJ, 2011, Managing strategic risk – the worldwide experience of metros, Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Management, Procurement and Law, Vol: 164, Pages: 173-180, ISSN: 1751-4304

Journal article

Melo PC, Harris NG, Graham DJ, Anderson RJ, Barron Aet al., 2011, Determinants of Delay Incident Occurrence in Urban Metros, TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH RECORD, Pages: 10-18, ISSN: 0361-1981

Journal article

Trompet M, Anderson RJ, Graham DJ, 2009, Variability in Comparable Performance of Urban Bus Operations, TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH RECORD, Pages: 177-184, ISSN: 0361-1981

Journal article

Graham DJ, Crotte A, Anderson RJ, 2009, A dynamic panel analysis of urban metro demand, TRANS RES E

Journal article

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