Imperial College London

Dr Richard J Pinder

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Director of Undergraduate Public Health Education
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 0789richard.pinder

 
 
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Location

 

313Reynolds BuildingCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Boshari:2020,
author = {Boshari, T and Sharpe, C and Poots, A and Watt, H and Rahman, S and Pinder, R},
journal = {Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health},
title = {An observational study of the association between diverse licensed premises types and alcohol-related violence in an inner-London borough},
url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/81415},
year = {2020}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Background: An ecological correlation has been observed between licensed premises and alcohol-related violence (ARV). In the United Kingdom to date, no evidence directly connects alcohol-related harm to a single premises type. Recent policies have called for a diversified alcohol offer yet quantitative evidence in support remains sparse. This study aims to inform policy by determining whether diversification of the alcohol economy is desirable, and to inform the licensing process and submission of public health evidence. Methods: Using 11-years of local licensing data from the London Borough of Southwark, alcohol availability over time was approximated by the number of extant alcohol licences, categorised by outlet type: drinking establishments, eateries, takeaways, off-sales, and ‘other’. Harm was quantified drawing on law enforcement intelligence that recorded ARV. A linked dataset was analysed using negative binomial regression, contrasting cumulative impact zones (CIZ) – a common alcohol control policy – with non-CIZ geographies. Results: Each licensed drinking establishment was associated with a 1.6% (95% CI 0.7% to 2.6%; p=0.001) increase in ARV, respectively. ‘Other’ outlets had a protective effect and were associated with a 1.8% (95% CI 1.0% to 2.5%; p<0.001) decrease in ARV. Conclusion: This study provides direct evidence for an association between alcohol-related harm and licensed premises. The varying associations between outlet type and ARV provide local public health stakeholders with an evidence base upon which to advocate for licensing policies that diversify alcohol availability.
AU - Boshari,T
AU - Sharpe,C
AU - Poots,A
AU - Watt,H
AU - Rahman,S
AU - Pinder,R
PY - 2020///
SN - 0143-005X
TI - An observational study of the association between diverse licensed premises types and alcohol-related violence in an inner-London borough
T2 - Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/81415
ER -