Imperial College London

DrRongjunChen

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Chemical Engineering

Reader in Biomaterials Engineering
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2070rongjun.chen Website

 
 
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Location

 

408ACE ExtensionSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Biochemistry - CENG95014

Aims

The overall aim of the Biochemistry course is to produce a succinct summary of biochemistry and molecular & cell biology and provide the chemical engineering students with an introduction to the basic principles that dictate the molecular processes of life, the various cellular systems, and the biotechnology techniques of importance.  This course will serve as an excellent background to students wishing to undertake further training in the areas of biochemical/bioprocess, environmental, and biomedical engineering.

Role

Course Leader

Advanced Chemical Engineering Design Practice Final Year Design - CENG97006

Aims

The Design Project has the objective of giving students experience of advanced design practice by carrying out a complex design task in as realistic a way as possible. The desired learning outcomes include producing a comprehensive design in response to an open-ended brief, while working in a large team, under realistic time pressure and on the basis of limited information.

The main aims of the Design Project are to help students:

develop skills in complex design problem-solving including technical, safety, environmental and economic aspects

develop skills in the effective management of work and decision making in large groups

develop skills in the presentation (oral and written) of complex techno-economic results

Role

Lecturer

Biochemical Engineering - CENG97035

Aims

Significant progress has been made in the upstream production of biopharmaceuticals over the last few decades. Despite the increasing successes in discovering protein-based medicines, their manufacture in a cost effective and reliable fashion remains a major industrial challenge. Our current separation processes at its optimum, work best for globular proteins (2 - 10 nm), and become increasingly ineffective as the particle size increases beyond tens of nanometers. Some of these products include cells, vaccines, viruses, protein conjugates, etc, increasing in their complexity. This course will start off with fermentation, and description of these big products properties. Then followed by a fundamental look at conventional downstream separations approaches, to include; Cell Lysis, Sedimentation/Filtration, Ab/Ad-sorption, Extraction, Precipitation, Chromatography, Crystallisation and Drying and wrapped up with a discussion on modern separation technologies for these potential target products. The aim of the course is to provide an overview of many of the techniques used in biotechnology, which in many cases differ markedly from chemical engineering.

Role

Lecturer