Imperial College London

Dr Sara De Matteis

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Honorary Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

s.de-matteis

 
 
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G51Emmanuel Kaye BuildingRoyal Brompton Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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104 results found

Archangelidi O, Sathiyajit S, Consonni D, Jarvis D, De Matteis Set al., 2021, Cleaning products and respiratory health outcomes in occupational cleaners: a systematic review and meta-analysis, OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, Vol: 78, Pages: 604-617, ISSN: 1351-0711

Journal article

Ratanachina J, Amaral A, De Matteis S, Cullinan P, Burney Pet al., 2021, Farming, pesticide exposure and respiratory health: a cross-sectional study in Thailand, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN: 1351-0711

Objective: To assess the association of lung function and respiratory symptoms with farming, particularly pesticide use, in an agricultural province in Thailand.Methods: We undertook a cross-sectional survey of adults aged 40–65 in Nan province, Thailand, between May and August 2019. We randomly recruited 345 villagers and enriched the sample with 82 government employees. All participants performed post-bronchodilator spirometry and completed a questionnaire covering information on respiratory symptoms, farming activities, pesticide use and known risk factors for respiratory disease. Associations of respiratory outcomes with farming and pesticide exposures were examined by multivariable regression analysis.Results: The response rate was 94%. The prevalence of chronic airflow obstruction among villagers was 5.5%. Villagers had, on average, a lower percent predicted post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) than government employees (98.3% vs 100.3%; p=0.04). There was no evidence of association of lung function with farming activities, the use of specific herbicides (glyphosate and paraquat), insecticides (organophosphates and pyrethroids) or fungicides. The exceptions were poultry farming, associated with chronic cough and an increase of FEV1/FVC, and atrazine, for which duration (p-trend <0.01), intensity (p-trend <0.01) and cumulative hours (p-trend=0.01) of use were all associated with higher FEV1/FVC in an exposure–response manner. Cumulative hours (−280 mL/hour), low duration (−270 mL/year) and intensity (−270 mL/hour/year) of atrazine use were associated with lower FVC.Conclusions: Chronic airflow obstruction is uncommon among villagers of an agricultural province in Nan, Thailand. Farming and pesticide use are unlikely to be major causes of respiratory problems there.

Journal article

De Matteis S, 2021, COVID-19: are not all workers 'essential'?, OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, Vol: 78, Pages: 305-306, ISSN: 1351-0711

Journal article

Meloni F, Satta G, Padoan M, Montagna A, Pilia I, Argiolas A, Piro S, Magnani C, Gambelunghe A, Muzi G, Ferri GM, Vimercati L, Zanotti R, Scarpa A, Zucca M, De Matteis S, Campagna M, Miligi L, Cocco Pet al., 2021, Occupational exposure to glyphosate and risk of lymphoma:results of an Italian multicenter case-control study, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, Vol: 20

Journal article

Cocco P, Meloni F, Coratza A, Schirru D, Campagna M, De Matteis Set al., 2021, Vaccination against seasonal influenza and socio-economic and environmental factors as determinants of the geographic variation of COVID-19 incidence and mortality in the Italian elderly, PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, Vol: 143, ISSN: 0091-7435

Journal article

Cocco P, Satta G, Meloni F, Pilia I, Ahmed F, Becker N, Casabonne D, de Sanjose S, Foretova L, Maynadie M, Nieters A, Staines A, 't Mannetje A, Zucca M, Ennas MG, Campagna M, De Matteis S, Benavente Yet al., 2021, Occupational exposure to organic dust and risk of lymphoma subtypes in the EPILYMPH case-control study, SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF WORK ENVIRONMENT & HEALTH, Vol: 47, Pages: 42-51, ISSN: 0355-3140

Journal article

De Matteis S, Ronsmans S, Nemery B, 2020, Respiratory Health Effects of Exposure to Cleaning Products, CLINICS IN CHEST MEDICINE, Vol: 41, Pages: 641-+, ISSN: 0272-5231

Journal article

Meloni F, Satta G, Padoan M, Montagna A, Pilia I, Argiolas A, Piro S, Magnani C, Gambelunghe A, Muzi G, Ferri GM, Vimercati L, Zanotti R, Scarpa A, Zucca M, Matteis SD, Campagna M, Miligi L, Cocco Pet al., 2020, Occupational Exposure to Glyphosate and Risk of Lymphoma: Results of an Italian Multicenter Case-Control Study

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>BackgroundThe International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) recently classified glyphosate, the most used herbicide worldwide, as a probable human carcinogen. We inquired into the association between occupational exposure to glyphosate and risk of lymphoma subtypes in a multicenter case-control study conducted in Italy. MethodsThe Italian Gene-Environment Interactions in Lymphoma Etiology (ItGxE) study took place in 2011-17 in six Italian centres. Overall, 867 incident lymphoma cases and 774 controls participated in the study. Based on detailed questionnaire information, occupational experts classified duration, confidence, frequency, and intensity of exposure to glyphosate for each study subject. Using unconditional regression analysis, we modelled risk of major lymphoma subtypes associated with exposure to glyphosate adjusted by age, gender, education, and study centre. ResultsVery few study subjects (2.2%) were classified as ever exposed to glyphosate. Risk of follicular lymphoma (FL) was elevated 7-fold in subjects classified as ever exposed to glyphosate with medium-high confidence, 4.5-fold in association with medium-high cumulative exposure level, 12-fold with medium-high exposure intensity, and 6-fold with exposure for 10 days or more per year. Significant upward trends were detected with all the exposure metrics, but duration. The overall p-value for an upward trend with four independent metrics was 1.88 x 10<jats:sup>-4</jats:sup>. There was no association with risk of lymphoma (any subtype), Non Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-cell lymphoma, or the major lymphoma subtypes other than FL. ConclusionsOur findings provide limited support to the IARC decision to classify glyphosate as Group 2A human carcinogen.</jats:p>

Journal article

van der Plaat DA, De Matteis S, Sadhra S, Jarvis D, Cullinan P, Minelli Cet al., 2020, Interaction between occupational exposures and antioxidant geneson chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in UK Biobank, ERS, Publisher: European Medical Group LTD, Pages: 77-78, ISSN: 2054-3166

Conference paper

Ratanachina J, Amaral A, De Matteis S, Cullinan P, Burney Pet al., 2020, Farming and respiratory health: a cross-sectional study in Thailand, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

van der Plaat D, De Matteis S, Sadhra S, Jarvis D, Cullinan P, Minelli Cet al., 2020, Interaction between VGDF exposure and antioxidant genes on COPD in UK Biobank, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Fishwick D, Thompson E, Heederik D, Van Tongeren M, De Matteis S, Weldam S, Sumner J, Smyth D, Szmytke E, Blanc P, Powell Pet al., 2020, Using digital and social media to highlight the risks of occupational exposures as a cause of lung diseases, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

De Matteis S, Consonni D, 2020, COVID-19 and healthcare workers, EPIDEMIOLOGIA & PREVENZIONE, Vol: 44, Pages: 340-342, ISSN: 1120-9763

Journal article

Jennings N, Fecht D, De Matteis S, 2020, Mapping the co-benefits of climate change action to issues of public concern in the UK: a narrative review, The Lancet Planetary Health, Vol: 4, Pages: e424-e433, ISSN: 2542-5196

To avoid a 1·5°C rise in global temperatures above preindustrial levels, the next phase of reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will need to be comparatively rapid. Linking the co-benefits of climate action to wider issues that the public are concerned about can help decision makers to prioritise decarbonisation options that increase the chance of public support for such changes, while ensuring that a just transition is delivered. We identified key issues of concern to the UK public by use of Ipsos MORI public opinion data from 2007 to 2020 and used these data to guide a narrative review of academic and grey literature on the co-benefits of climate change action for the UK. Correspondence with civil servants, third sector organisations, and relevant academics allowed us to identify omissions and to ensure policy relevance of the recommendations. This evidence-based Review of the various co-benefits of climate change action for the UK identifies four main areas: health and the National Health Service; security; economy and unemployment; and poverty, housing, and inequality. Associated trade-offs are also discussed. City-level and regional-level governments are particularly well placed to incorporate co-benefits into their decision making because it is at this scale that co-benefits most clearly manifest, and where interventions can have the most immediate effects.

Journal article

Sadhra SS, Mohammed N, Kurmi OP, Fishwick D, De Matteis S, Hutchings S, Jarvis D, Ayres JG, Rushton Let al., 2020, Occupational exposure to inhaled pollutants and risk of airflow obstruction: a large UK population-based UK Biobank cohort, THORAX, Vol: 75, Pages: 468-475, ISSN: 0040-6376

Journal article

Consonni D, De Matteis S, Dallari B, Pesatori AC, Riboldi L, Mensi Cet al., 2020, Impact of an asbestos cemet factory on mesothelioma incidence in a community in Italy, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, Vol: 183, ISSN: 0013-9351

Journal article

Schraufnagel DE, De Matteis S, Hoffmann B, 2020, Reply: An "Old" Methodological Pitfall: Numbers of Deaths Due to Reducing Air Pollution Cannot Be Identified from Epidemiological Data, ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY, Vol: 17, Pages: 528-528, ISSN: 1546-3222

Journal article

Ratanachina J, De Matteis S, Cullinan P, Burney Pet al., 2019, Pesticide exposure and lung function: a systematic review and meta-analysis., Occupational Medicine, Vol: 70, Pages: 14-23, ISSN: 0962-7480

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have reported associations between pesticide exposure and respiratory health effects, but the quantitative impact on lung function is unclear. To fill this gap, we undertook a systematic review of the available literature on the association between pesticide exposure and pulmonary function. AIMS: To examine all available literature regarding the relationship between occupational and environmental exposure to pesticides and lung function. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science databases to 1 October 2017 without any date or language restrictions using a combination of MeSH terms and free text for 'pesticide exposure' and 'lung function'. We included studies that met the criteria of our research protocol registered in PROSPERO, and we assessed their quality using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale. RESULTS: Of 2356 articles retrieved, 56 articles were included in the systematic review and pooled in meta-analyses for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC), FVC and FEV1. There was tentative evidence that exposure to cholinesterase (ChE) inhibiting pesticides reduced FEV1/FVC and no evidence that paraquat exposure affected lung function in farmers. CONCLUSIONS: Respiratory surveillance should be enhanced in those exposed to ChE-inhibiting pesticides which reduced FEV1/FVC according to the meta-analysis. Our study is limited by heterogeneity between studies due to different types of exposure assessment to pesticides and potential confounders. Further studies with a more accurate exposure assessment are suggested.

Journal article

Nafees AA, De Matteis S, Kadir MM, Burney P, Coggon D, Semple S, Cullinan Pet al., 2019, MultiTex RCT - a multifaceted intervention package for protection against cotton dust exposure among textile workers - a cluster randomized controlled trial in Pakistan: study protocol, Trials, Vol: 20, ISSN: 1745-6215

BACKGROUND: In the Pakistani textile industry the prevalence of workplace respiratory illnesses, including byssinosis, is high. The MultiTex RCT study aims to determine the effectiveness of a multifaceted intervention package in reducing dust levels in cotton mills, decreasing the frequency of respiratory symptoms among cotton textile workers, and improving their lung function. METHODS/DESIGN: We will conduct a cluster-randomized controlled trial at 28 textile mills in Karachi. The intervention will comprise: training in occupational health for all workers and managers reinforced by regular refresher sessions; the formation of workplace committees to draw up, agree and promote a health and safety plan that includes wet mopping, safe disposal of cotton dust, and the use of simple face-masks, as well as further publicity about the risks from cotton dust; and provision of adequate supplies of face-masks to support the health and safety plan. Participating mills will be randomized to intervention and control arms following a baseline survey. The impact of the intervention will be determined through follow-up surveys conducted at 3, 12 and 18 months. Data collection in the surveys will include spirometry, questionnaire-based interviews and cotton-dust measurements. DISCUSSION: If successful, the study may pave the way for simple, low-cost interventions that can help reduce cotton-dust levels in textile mills, and improve the respiratory health of textile workers in developing countries such as Pakistan. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT03738202. Registered on 12 November 2018.

Journal article

Schraufnagel DE, Balmes JR, De Matteis S, Hoffman B, Kim WJ, Perez-Padilla R, Rice M, Sood A, Vanker A, Wuebbles DJet al., 2019, Health Benefits of Air Pollution Reduction, ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY, Vol: 16, Pages: 1478-1487, ISSN: 1546-3222

Journal article

Nafees AA, Matteis SD, Kadir MM, Burney P, Coggon D, Semple S, Cullinan Pet al., 2019, MultiTex RCT – a multifaceted intervention package for protection against cotton dust exposure among textile workers – a cluster randomized controlled trial in Pakistan: study protocol

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>Background In the Pakistani textile industry the prevalence of workplace respiratory illnesses, including byssinosis, is high. This study aims to determine the effectiveness of a multifaceted intervention package in reducing dust levels in cotton mills, decreasing the frequency of respiratory symptoms among cotton textile workers, and improving their lung function. Methods/design We will conduct a cluster-randomized controlled trial at 28 textile mills in Karachi. The intervention will comprise: training in occupational health for all workers and managers backed by regular refresher sessions; the formation of workplace committees to draw up, agree and promote a health and safety plan that includes wet mopping, safe disposal of cotton dust, and the use of simple face masks, as well as further publicity about the risks from cotton dust; and provision of adequate supplies of face masks to support the health and safety plan. Participating mills will be randomized to intervention and control arms following a baseline survey. The impact of the intervention will be determined through follow-up surveys conducted at 3, 12 and 18 months. Data collection in the surveys will include spirometry, questionnaire-based interviews and cotton dust measurements. Discussion If successful, the study may pave the way for simple, low-cost interventions that can help reduce cotton dust levels in textile mills, and improve the respiratory health of textile workers in developing countries such as Pakistan.</jats:p>

Journal article

Consonni D, Migliore E, Barone-Adesi F, Dallari B, De Matteis S, Oddone E, Pesatori AC, Riboldi L, Mirabelli D, Mensi Cet al., 2019, Gender differences in pleural mesothelioma occurrence in Lombardy and Piedmont, Italy, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, Vol: 177, ISSN: 0013-9351

Journal article

Ratanachina J, De Matteis S, Cullinan P, Burney Pet al., 2019, Pesticide exposure and lung function: a systematic review and meta-analysis, European-Respiratory-Society (ERS) International Congress, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Consonni D, Calvi C, De Matteis S, Mirabelli D, Landi MT, Caporaso NE, Peters S, Vermeulen R, Kromhout H, Dallari B, Pesatori AC, Riboldi L, Mensi Cet al., 2019, Peritoneal mesothelioma and asbestos exposure: a population-based case-control study in Lombardy, Italy, OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, Vol: 76, Pages: 545-553, ISSN: 1351-0711

Journal article

Doiron D, de Hoogh K, Probst-Hensch N, Fortier I, Cai Y, De Matteis S, Hansell Aet al., 2019, Air pollution, lung function and COPD: results from the population-based UK Biobank study, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 54, ISSN: 0903-1936

Ambient air pollution increases the risk of respiratory mortality but evidence for impacts on lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)is less well established. The aim was toevaluatewhether ambient air pollution isassociated with lung function andCOPD, and explore potential vulnerability factors. We used UK Biobank data on 303,887 individuals aged 40-69 years, with complete covariate data and valid lung function measures. Cross-sectional analysesexamined associations ofLand Use Regression-based estimates ofparticulate matter (PM2.5, PM1035and PMcoarse) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations withforced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), the FEV1/FVC ratio, and COPD (FEV1/FVC 37< lower limit of normal). Effect modificationwas investigated for sex, age, obesity, smoking status, household income, asthma status, and occupations previously linked to COPD.40Higher exposures to each pollutant weresignificantly associated with lower lung function. A 5 μg/m3increase in PM2.5concentrationwas associated with lower FEV1(-83.13 mL [95%CI: -92.50, -73.75]) and FVC (-62.62 mL [95%CI:-73.91, -51.32]). COPD prevalence was associated with higher concentrations of PM2.5 (OR 1.52 [95%CI: 1.,1.62], per 5 μg/m3),PM10 (OR 1.08 [95%CI: 1.00,1.16], per 5 μg/m3), andNO2(OR 1.12 [95%CI: 1.10, 1.14], per 10 μg/m3), but not with PMcoarse.Stronger lung functionassociations were 46seenfor males, individuals from lower income households,and ‘at-risk’ occupations, and higher COPD associations for obese, lower income,and non-asthmatic participants. Ambient air pollution wasassociated with lowerlung function and increased COPD prevalencein this large study.

Journal article

De Matteis S, Jarvis D, Darnton A, Hutchings S, Sadhra S, Fishwick D, Rushton L, Cullinan Pet al., 2019, The occupations at increased risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): analysis of lifetime job-histories in the population-based UK Biobank Cohort, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 54, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 0903-1936

Occupational exposures are important, preventable causes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Identification of COPD high-risk jobs is key to focus preventive strategies, but a definitive job-list is unavailable.We addressed this issue by evaluating the association of lifetime job-histories and lung function data in the population-based UK Biobank cohort, whose unprecedented sample size allowed analyses restricted to never-smokers to rule out the most important confounder, tobacco smoking. COPD was spirometrically-defined as forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) <lower limit of normal (LLN). Lifetime job-histories were collected via OSCAR, a new validated online-tool that automatically codes jobs into the UK Standard Occupational Classification v.2000. Prevalence ratios for COPD by employment duration in each job compared to lifetime office workers were estimated using robust Poisson regression adjusted for age, sex, centre and smoking. Only associations confirmed among never-smokers and never-asthmatics were considered reliable.From the 116 375 participants with complete job-histories, 94 551 had acceptable/repeatable spirometry data and smoking information and were included in the analysis. Six occupations showed an increased COPD risk also among never-smokers and never-asthmatics; most of these also with positive exposure-response trends. Interesting new findings included sculptors, gardeners, and warehouse workers.COPD patients, especially never-smokers, should be asked about their job-history for better disease management. Focussed preventive strategies in COPD high-risk jobs are warranted.

Journal article

Archangelidi OA, Jarvis D, De Matteis SDM, 2019, P146 Cleaning products and respiratory health outcomes in professional cleaners: a systematic review and meta-analysis (vol 73, pg A181, 2018), THORAX, Vol: 74, Pages: 720-720, ISSN: 0040-6376

Journal article

Jennings N, Fecht D, De Matteis S, 2019, Co-benefits of climate change mitigation in the UK: What issues are the UK public concerned about and how can action on climate change help to address them?

Report

de Vries M, Axson E, Ratanachina J, Dumas O, De Matteis S, Bedard A, Roda C, Moitra S, Dagli E, Dimanti A, Dilektasli AG, Ravara S, Amaral Aet al., 2019, European Respiratory Society International Congress 2018: Four shades of epidemiology and tobacco control, ERJ Open Research, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2312-0541

In this article, early career members and experienced members of the Epidemiology and Environment Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) highlight and summarise a selection of six sessions from the society’s annual congress, which in 2018 was held in Paris. The topics covered in these sessions span from cutting-edge molecular epidemiology of lung function to environmental, occupational and clinical epidemiology of respiratory disease and from emergent tobacco products to tobacco control.

Journal article

Schraufnagel DE, Balmes JR, Cowl CT, De Matteis S, Jung S-H, Mortimer K, Perez-Padilla R, Rice MB, Riojas-Rodriguez H, Sood A, Thurston GD, To T, Vanker A, Wuebbles DJet al., 2019, Air pollution and noncommunicable diseases: a review by the Forum of International Respiratory Societies' Environmental Committee, Part 1: the damaging effects of air pollution, Chest, Vol: 155, Pages: 409-416, ISSN: 0012-3692

Air pollution poses a great environmental risk to health. Outdoor fine particulate matter (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm) exposure is the fifth leading risk factor for death in the world, accounting for 4.2 million deaths and > 103 million disability-adjusted life years lost according to the Global Burden of Disease Report. The World Health Organization attributes 3.8 million additional deaths to indoor air pollution. Air pollution can harm acutely, usually manifested by respiratory or cardiac symptoms, as well as chronically, potentially affecting every organ in the body. It can cause, complicate, or exacerbate many adverse health conditions. Tissue damage may result directly from pollutant toxicity because fine and ultrafine particles can gain access to organs, or indirectly through systemic inflammatory processes. Susceptibility is partly under genetic and epigenetic regulation. Although air pollution affects people of all regions, ages, and social groups, it is likely to cause greater illness in those with heavy exposure and greater susceptibility. Persons are more vulnerable to air pollution if they have other illnesses or less social support. Harmful effects occur on a continuum of dosage and even at levels below air quality standards previously considered to be safe.

Journal article

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