Imperial College London

ProfessorStephenRichardson

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Chemical Engineering

Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 5581s.m.richardson

 
 
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Location

 

5.10ACE ExtensionSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Summary

Biography

Date Role
2009-   Associate Provost (Institutional Affairs), Imperial College London
2008-2010   Principal of Faculty of Engineering
2001-2008   Head of Department, Chemical Engineering
1995-1999   Director of UG Studies and Deputy Head of Department, Chemical Engineering Department, Imperial College London.
1994-   Professor of Chemical Engineering, Chemical Engineering Department, Imperial College London.
1992-1994   Reader in Chemical Engineering, Chemical Engineering Department, Imperial College London.
1987-1992   Senior Lecturer, Chemical Engineering Department, Imperial College London.
1984-1985   Nuffield Foundation Science Research Fellow.
1978-1987   Lecturer, Chemical Engineering Department, Imperial College London.
1976-1977   Research Fellow, Chemical Engineering Department, Cambridge University, UK, Field: “Injection Moulding of Thermoplastics and Rubbers”
1975-1976   Rolls Royce Research Assistant, Chemical Engineering Department, Cambridge University, UK, Field: “Trans-sonic Flow”
1972-1975   PhD in Chemical Engineering, Chemical Engineering Department, Imperial College London, Thesis Title: “Numerical Solution of the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations”

 

Research interests

The rapid depressurisation or blowdown of a vessel or pipeline is a standard way of reducing the risk posed by a process emergency. The blowdown itself is, however, also a hazardous operation, the hazard arising from the low temperatures generated in the fluid in the vessel or line. These low temperatures can lead to a drop in the temperature of the walls below the ductile-brittle transition temperature of the steel from which the vessel or line is made. With my colleague, Dr Graham Saville, I have developed a computer program called Blowdown which is the only properly validated program which can simulate and predict what happens during blowdown. It has been extensively used offshore (over 120 oil and gas platforms) and onshore (over 20 gas terminals and many other petrochemicalplants). It has also been used to provide evidence in major accident investigations such as those following the tragedies on Piper Alpha and at Longford.

 


Links

MFS Multiphase Fluid Systems programme

 

Publications

Journals

Macchietto S, Hewitt GF, Coletti F, et al., 2011, Fouling in Crude Oil Preheat Trains: A Systematic Solution to an Old Problem, Heat Transfer Engineering, Vol:32, ISSN:0145-7632, Pages:197-215

Jamari S, Hale CP, Hewitt G, et al., 2008, Studies of the slug-annular regime transition in two-phase flow in horizontal pipes, Multiphase Science and Technology, Vol:20, ISSN:0276-1459, Pages:1-24

Hale CP, Hewitt GF, Hu B, et al., 2007, Gammas and X-ray tomography of liquid-liquid and gas-liquid-liquid flows, Multiphase Science and Technology, Vol:19, ISSN:0276-1459, Pages:241-267

Issa RI, Barbeau S, Hale CP, et al., 2007, Measurement and prediction of slug characteristics in three-phase flows, 13th International Conference on Multiphase Production Technology, Pages:153-169

Richardson SM, Saville G, Fisher SA, et al., 2006, Experimental determination of two-phase flow rates of hydrocarbons through restrictions, Process Safety and Environmental Protection, Vol:84, ISSN:0957-5820, Pages:40-53

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