Imperial College London

ProfessorStephenSmith

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Professor of Bioresource Systems
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6051s.r.smith

 
 
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Assistant

 

Miss Judith Barritt +44 (0)20 7594 5967

 
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Location

 

229Skempton BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Smith:2020:10.1016/j.envint.2020.105844,
author = {Smith, S and Rigby, H},
doi = {10.1016/j.envint.2020.105844},
journal = {Environment International},
pages = {1--10},
title = {The significance of cadmium entering the human food chain via livestock ingestion from the agricultural use of biosolids, with special reference to the UK},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2020.105844},
volume = {143},
year = {2020}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - When biosolids are applied to agricultural soil, potentially toxic elements (PTEs) accumulate in the topsoil, although it takes many repeated applications to reach soil limit values. Two programmes of UK government-funded research were commissioned in the 1990s to investigate the transfer of PTEs to the food chain via ingestion by sheep grazing biosolids- amended soil. Here, we critically re-examine this evidence in the light of other published work and current food quality standards. This was particularly motivated by the need to determine the safety of biosolids controls on PTEs in relation to revised and stricter European food quality controls for PTEs in foodstuff. The major pathway for transfer of PTEs to grazing livestock is via direct ingestion of biosolids or biosolids-amended soil from the soil surface. The main elements of concern for the human diet are cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb), with Cd being the focus of the current paper. Animal ingestion of plant tissue is also a potential pathway for Cd exposure, which, unlike Pb, can transfer to crop tissues. The concentrations of Cd in the muscle tissue of sheep grazing biosolids-amended soil were generally small and similar to control values. Cadmium concentrations in sheep offal were below the maximum permitted concentration for human consumption. This was despite ingestion of soils exceeding the maximum permissible concentration for Cd in soil (3 mg kg-1 dry soil) by up to three times, at an ingestion rate of 10% total dietary dry matter intake. Grazing trials under practical conditions on high Cd soils demonstrated that the Cd concentrations in sheep offal remained below the food limit value for this element in offal from the combined intakes from biosolids-amended soil and herbage. Futhermore, given the substantial fall in environmental emissions and concentrations in biosolids of this element and, consequently, it cannot accumulate in soil to the limit value, biosolids Cd does not represent
AU - Smith,S
AU - Rigby,H
DO - 10.1016/j.envint.2020.105844
EP - 10
PY - 2020///
SN - 0160-4120
SP - 1
TI - The significance of cadmium entering the human food chain via livestock ingestion from the agricultural use of biosolids, with special reference to the UK
T2 - Environment International
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2020.105844
UR - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412020317992?via%3Dihub
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/80560
VL - 143
ER -