Imperial College London

Dr Sabita Uthaya

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3315 7975s.uthaya

 
 
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Location

 

Neonatal UnitChelsea and Westminster HospitalChelsea and Westminster Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

54 results found

Greenbury SF, Angelini DE, Ougham K, Battersby C, Gale C, Uthaya S, Modi Net al., 2022, Post-natal growth of very preterm neonates, LANCET CHILD & ADOLESCENT HEALTH, Vol: 6, Pages: E11-E11, ISSN: 2352-4642

Journal article

Webbe J, Longford N, Battersby C, Ougham K, Uthaya S, Modi N, Gale Cet al., 2022, Outcomes in relation to early parenteral nutrition use in preterm neonates born between 30 and 33 weeks gestation: a propensity score matched observational study, Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, Vol: 107, Pages: 131-136, ISSN: 1359-2998

ObjectiveTo evaluate whether in preterm neonates parenteral nutrition use in the first sevenpostnatal days, compared with no parenteral nutrition use, is associated withdifferences in survival and other important morbidities. Randomised trials in criticallyill older children show that harms, such as nosocomial infection, outweigh benefits ofearly parenteral nutrition administration; there is a paucity of similar data inneonates.DesignRetrospective cohort study using propensity matching including 35 maternal, infantand organisational factors to minimise bias and confounding.SettingNational, population-level clinical data obtained for all National Health Serviceneonatal units in England and Wales.PatientsPreterm neonates born between 30+0 and 32+6 weeks+days.InterventionsThe exposure was parenteral nutrition administered in the first seven days ofpostnatal life; the comparator was no parenteral nutrition.Main outcome measuresThe primary outcome was survival to discharge from neonatal care. Secondaryoutcomes comprised the neonatal core outcome set.Results16,292 neonates were compared in propensity score matched analyses. Comparedwith matched neonates not given parenteral nutrition in the first postnatal week, neonates who received parenteral nutrition had higher survival at discharge(absolute rate increase 0.91%; 95% CI 0.53% to 1.30%), but higher rates ofnecrotising enterocolitis (absolute rate increase 4.6%), bronchopulmonary dysplasia(absolute rate increase 3.9%), late-onset sepsis (absolute rate increase 1.5%) andneed for surgical procedures (absolute rate increase 0.92%).ConclusionsIn neonates born between 30+0 and 32+6 weeks gestation, those given parenteralnutrition in the first postnatal week had a higher rate of survival but higher rates ofimportant neonatal morbidities. Clinician equipoise in this area should be resolvedby prospective, randomised trials.

Journal article

Uthaya S, Longford N, Battersby C, Oughham K, Lanoue J, Modi Net al., 2021, Early versus later initiation of parenteral nutrition for very preterm infants: a propensity score-matched observational study, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD-FETAL AND NEONATAL EDITION, Vol: 107, Pages: 137-142, ISSN: 1359-2998

Journal article

Uthaya S, 2021, Better preterm parenteral nutrition practice, EARLY HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 162, ISSN: 0378-3782

Journal article

Uthaya S, Longford N, Battersby C, Ougham K, Lanoue J, Modi Net al., 2021, Early versus later initiation of parenteral nutrition for very preterm infants: a propensity score matched observational study, Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, ISSN: 1359-2998

Background: A current standard of care based on expert opinion is to commence parenteral nutrition (PN) within hours of birth in very preterm infants. Trials in critically ill adults and children, including term infants have found short and long-term harms from early initiation of PN. Methods: We included all infants born below 31 weeks gestation between January 2008 and December 2019 and admitted to National Health Service neonatal units in England and Wales. The source of data was the National Neonatal Research Database. The exposure was PN initiated within the first two days after birth (early) versus after the second postnatal day (late). We used propensity matched analysis to balance the two groups on background variables. The primary outcome was survival to discharge without major morbidity. Findings: Of 65,033 infants included, 16,294 infants formed the matched cohort, 8147 in each group. There was no evidence of a difference in survival to discharge without major morbidity (absolute rate difference (ARD) between early versus late 0·50%; 95% Confidence Interval (CI), -1·45, 0·45; p=0·29). Survival to discharge was higher in the early group (ARD -3·25%; 95% CI, -3·82 to -2·68; p<0·001) but they also had higher rates of late-onset sepsis (ARD -0·84%; 95% CI, -1·20 to -0·48; p<0·001), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (ARD -1·24%; 95% CI, -2·17 to -0·30; p=0·01), treatment for retinopathy of prematurity (ARD (-0·5%; 95% CI, -0·84 to -0.17; p<0·001), surgical procedures (ARD -0·8%; 95% CI, -1·40 to -0·20; p=0·01) and greater drop in weight z-score between birth and discharge (absolute difference 0·019; 95% CI, 0·003 to 0·039; p=0·02). Among infants that died the median age (days) at death was shorter in the late group (ARD 6; 95% CI, 6; p<0.001). Interpretation: These o

Journal article

Greenbury SF, Longford N, Ougham K, Angelini ED, Battersby C, Uthaya S, Modi Net al., 2021, Changes in neonatal admissions, care processes and outcomes in England and Wales during the COVID-19 pandemic: a whole population cohort study, BMJ Open, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2044-6055

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic instigated multiple societal and healthcare interventions with potential to affect perinatal practice. We evaluated population-level changes in preterm and full-term admissions to neonatal units, care processes and outcomes.Design: Observational cohort study using the UK National Neonatal Research Database.Setting: England and Wales.Participants: Admissions to National Health Service neonatal units from 2012 to 2020.Main outcome measures: Admissions by gestational age, ethnicity and Index of Multiple Deprivation, and key care processes and outcomes.Methods: We calculated differences in numbers and rates between April and June 2020 (spring), the first 3 months of national lockdown (COVID-19 period), and December 2019–February 2020 (winter), prior to introduction of mitigation measures, and compared them with the corresponding differences in the previous 7 years. We considered the COVID-19 period highly unusual if the spring–winter difference was smaller or larger than all previous corresponding differences, and calculated the level of confidence in this conclusion.Results: Marked fluctuations occurred in all measures over the 8 years with several highly unusual changes during the COVID-19 period. Total admissions fell, having risen over all previous years (COVID-19 difference: −1492; previous 7-year difference range: +100, +1617; p<0.001); full-term black admissions rose (+66; −64, +35; p<0.001) whereas Asian (−137; −14, +101; p<0.001) and white (−319; −235, +643: p<0.001) admissions fell. Transfers to higher and lower designation neonatal units increased (+129; −4, +88; p<0.001) and decreased (−47; −25, +12; p<0.001), respectively. Total preterm admissions decreased (−350; −26, +479; p<0.001). The fall in extremely preterm admissions was most marked in the two lowest socioeconomic quintiles.Conclusions: Our findings indicate substantia

Journal article

Greenbury SF, Angelini ED, Ougham K, Battersby C, Gale C, Uthaya S, Modi Net al., 2021, Birthweight and patterns of postnatal weight gain in very and extremely preterm babies in England and Wales, 2008-19: a cohort study, The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, Vol: 5, Pages: 719-728, ISSN: 2352-4642

BACKGROUND: Intrauterine and postnatal weight are widely regarded as biomarkers of fetal and neonatal wellbeing, but optimal weight gain following preterm birth is unknown. We aimed to describe changes over time in birthweight and postnatal weight gain in very and extremely preterm babies, in relation to major morbidity and healthy survival. METHODS: In this cohort study, we used whole-population data from the UK National Neonatal Research Database for infants below 32 weeks gestation admitted to neonatal units in England and Wales between Jan 1, 2008, and Dec 31, 2019. We used non-linear Gaussian process to estimate monthly trends, and Bayesian multilevel regression to estimate unadjusted and adjusted coefficients. We evaluated birthweight; weight change from birth to 14 days; weight at 36 weeks postmenstrual age; associated Z scores; and longitudinal weights for babies surviving to 36 weeks postmenstrual age with and without major morbidities. We adjusted birthweight for antenatal, perinatal, and demographic variables. We additionally adjusted change in weight at 14 days and weight at 36 weeks postmenstrual age, and their Z scores, for postnatal variables. FINDINGS: The cohort comprised 90 817 infants. Over the 12-year period, mean differences adjusted for antenatal, perinatal, demographic, and postnatal variables were 0 g (95% compatibility interval -7 to 7) for birthweight (-0·01 [-0·05 to 0·03] for change in associated Z score); 39 g (26 to 51) for change in weight from birth to 14 days (0·14 [0·08 to 0·19] for change in associated Z score); and 105 g (81 to 128) for weight at 36 weeks postmenstrual age (0·27 [0·21 to 0·33] for change in associated Z score). Greater weight at 36 weeks postmenstrual age was robust to additional adjustment for enteral nutritional intake. In babies surviving without major morbidity, weight velocity in all gestational age groups stabilised at around 34 weeks post

Journal article

Greenbury SF, Angelini ED, Ougham K, Battersby C, Uthaya S, Modi Net al., 2021, Birthweight and Patterns of Postnatal Weight Gain in Very and Extremely Preterm Babies: A 12 Year, Whole Population Study, The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, ISSN: 2352-4642

Journal article

Gale C, Ougham K, Jawad S, Uthaya S, Modi Net al., 2021, Brain injury occurring during or soon after birth: annual incidence and rates of brain injuries to monitor progress against the national maternity ambition 2018 and 2019 national data, Brain injury occurring during or soon after birth: annual incidence and rates of brain injuries to monitor progress against the national maternity ambition 2018 and 2019 national data, London, UK, Publisher: The Neonatal Data Analysis Unit, Imperial College London, 3

Report

Gale C, Jeyakumaran D, Ougham K, Jawad S, Uthaya S, Modi Net al., 2021, Correction to: Brain injury occurring during or soon afterbirth: annual incidence and rates of brain injuries to monitorprogress against the national maternity ambition. 2016 and 2017 data, Correction to: Brain injury occurring during or soon afterbirth: annual incidence and rates of brain injuries to monitorprogress against the national maternity ambition. 2016 and 2017 data, London, UK, Publisher: The Neonatal Data Analysis Unit, Imperial College London, 2

Correction to the following report: https://doi.org/10.25561/87336

Report

Gale C, statnikov E, Jawad S, Uthaya S, Modi Net al., 2021, Correction to: Brain injury occurring during or soon after birth: a report for the national maternity ambition commissioned by the Department of Health, Correction to: Brain injury occurring during or soon after birth: a report for the national maternity ambition commissioned by the Department of Health, London, UK, Publisher: The Neonatal Data Analysis Unit, Imperial College London, 1

Report

Yeo KT, Oei JL, De Luca D, Schmölzer GM, Guaran R, Palasanthiran P, Kumar K, Buonocore G, Cheong J, Owen LS, Kusuda S, James J, Lim G, Sharma A, Uthaya S, Gale C, Whittaker E, Battersby C, Modi N, Norman M, Naver L, Giannoni E, Diambomba Y, Shah PS, Gagliardi L, Harrison M, Pillay S, Alburaey A, Yuan Y, Zhang Het al., 2020, Review of guidelines and recommendations from 17 countries highlights the challenges that clinicians face caring for neonates born to mothers with COVID-19., Acta Paediatrica: Nurturing the Child, Vol: 109, Pages: 2192-2207, ISSN: 1651-2227

AIM: This review examined how applicable national and regional clinical practice guidelines and recommendations for managing neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 mothers were to the evolving pandemic. METHODS: A systematic search and review identified 20 guidelines and recommendations that had been published by 25 May 2020. We analysed documents from 17 countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, India, Italy, Japan, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK and the USA. RESULTS: The documents were based on expert consensus with limited evidence and were of variable, low methodological rigour. Most did not provide recommendations for delivery methods or managing symptomatic infants. None provided recommendations for post-discharge assimilation of potentially-infected infants into the community. The majority encouraged keeping mothers and infants together, subject to infection control measures, but one-third recommended separation. Although breastfeeding or using breastmilk were widely encouraged, two countries specifically prohibited this. CONCLUSION: The guidelines and recommendations for managing infants affected by COVID-19 were of low, variable quality and may be unsustainable. It is important that transmission risks are not increased when new information is incorporated into clinical recommendations. Practice guidelines should emphasise the extent of uncertainty and clearly define gaps in the evidence.

Journal article

Achten NB, Klingenberg C, Benitz WE, Stocker M, Schlapbach LJ, Giannoni E, Bokelaar R, Driessen GJA, Brodin P, Uthaya S, van Rossum AMC, Plotz FBet al., 2019, Association of Use of the Neonatal Early-Onset Sepsis Calculator With Reduction in Antibiotic Therapy and Safety A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis, JAMA PEDIATRICS, Vol: 173, Pages: 1032-1040, ISSN: 2168-6203

Journal article

Webbe J, Longford N, Uthaya S, Modi N, Gale Cet al., 2019, Outcomes following early parenteral nutrition use in preterm neonates: Protocol for an observational study, BMJ Open, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-5, ISSN: 2044-6055

Introduction Preterm babies are among the highest users of parenteral nutrition (PN) of any patient group, but there is wide variation in commencement, duration, and composition of PN and uncertainty around which groups will benefit from early introduction. Recent studies in critically unwell adults and children suggest that harms, specifically increased rates of nosocomial infection, outweigh the benefits of early administration of PN. In this study, we will describe early PN use in neonatal units in England, Wales and Scotland. We will also evaluate if this is associated with differences in important neonatal outcomes in neonates born between 30+0 and 32+6 weeks+days gestation.Methods and analysis We will use routinely collected data from all neonatal units in England, Wales and Scotland, available in the National Neonatal Research Database (NNRD). We will describe clinical practice in relation to any use of PN during the first 7 postnatal days among neonates admitted to neonatal care between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2017. We will compare outcomes in neonates born between 30+0 and 32+6 weeks+days gestation who did or did not receive PN in the first week after birth using a propensity score-matched approach. The primary outcome will be survival to discharge home. Secondary outcomes will include components of the neonatal core outcome set: outcomes identified as important by former patients, parents, clinicians and researchers.Ethics and dissemination We have obtained UK National Research Ethics Committee approval for this study (Ref: 18/NI/0214). The results of this study will be presented at academic conferences; the UK charity Bliss will aid dissemination to former patients and parents.

Journal article

Li Y, Liu X, Modi N, Uthaya Set al., 2019, Impact of breast milk intake on body composition at term in very preterm babies: secondary analysis of the Nutritional Evaluation and Optimisation in Neonates randomised controlled trial, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD-FETAL AND NEONATAL EDITION, Vol: 104, Pages: F306-F312, ISSN: 1359-2998

Journal article

Vanhinsbergh L, Uthaya S, Bain BJ, 2018, Methylene blue-induced Heinz body hemolytic anemia in a premature neonate, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEMATOLOGY, Vol: 93, Pages: 716-717, ISSN: 0361-8609

Journal article

Binder C, Longford N, Gale CRK, Modi N, Uthaya Set al., 2018, Body composition following necrotising enterocolitis in preterm infants, Neonatology, Vol: 113, Pages: 242-248, ISSN: 1661-7800

Background: The optimal nutritional regimen for preterm infants, including those that develop necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), is unknown. Objective: The objective here was to evaluate body composition at term in infants following NEC, in comparison with healthy infants. The primary outcome measure was non-adipose tissue mass (non-ATM). Methods: We compared body composition assessed by magnetic resonance imaging at term in infants born <31 weeks of gestational age that participated in NEON, a trial comparing incremental versus immediate delivery of parenteral amino acids on non-ATM, and SMOF versus intralipid on intrahepatocellular lipid content. There were no differences in the primary outcomes. We compared infants that received surgery for NEC (NEC-surgical), infants with medically managed NEC (NEC-medical), and infants without NEC (reference). Results: A total of 133 infants were included (8 NEC-surgical; 15 NEC-medical; 110 reference). In comparison with the reference group, infants in the NEC-surgical and NEC-medical groups were significantly lighter [adjusted mean difference (95% CI) NEC-surgical: –630 g (–1,010, –210), p = 0.003; NEC-medical: –440 g (–760, –110), p = 0.009] and the total adipose tissue volume (ATV) was significantly lower [NEC-surgical: –360 cm3 (–516, –204), p < 0.001; NEC-medical: –127 cm3 (–251, –4); p = 0.043]. There were no significant differences in non-ATM [adjusted mean difference (95% CI) NEC-surgical: –46 g (–281, 189), p = 0.70; NEC-medical: –122 g (–308, 63), p = 0.20]. Conclusion: The lower weight at term in preterm infants following surgically and medically managed NEC, in comparison to preterm infants that did not develop the disease, was secondary to a reduction in ATV. This suggests that the nutritional regimen received was adequate to preserve non-ATM but not to support the normal third-trimester deposition of adipose tissue

Journal article

Gale C, Statnikov Y, Jawad S, Uthaya SN, Modi N, Brain Injuries expert working groupet al., 2017, Neonatal brain injuries in England: population-based incidence derived from routinely recorded clinical data held in the National Neonatal Research Database, Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition, Vol: 103, Pages: F301-F306, ISSN: 1359-2998

In 2015, the Department of Health in England announced an ambition to reduce 'brain injuries occurring during or soon after birth'. We describe the development of a pragmatic case definition and present annual incidence rates.Retrospective cohort study using data held in the National Neonatal Research Database (NNRD) extracted from neonatal electronic patient records from all National Health Service (NHS) neonatal units in England, Wales and Scotland. In 2010-2011, population coverage in the NNRD was incomplete, hence rate estimates are presented as a range; from 2012, population coverage is complete, and rates (95% CIs) are presented. Rates are per 1000 live births.NHS neonatal units in England.Infants admitted for neonatal care; denominator: live births in England.'Brain injuries occurring at or soon after birth' defined as infants with seizures, hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, stroke, intracranial haemorrhage, central nervous system infection and kernicterus and preterm infants with cystic periventricular leucomalacia.In 2010, the lower estimate of the rate of 'Brain injuries occurring at or soon after birth' in England was 4.53 and the upper estimate was 5.19; in 2015, the rate was 5.14 (4.97, 5.32). For preterm infants, the population incidence in 2015 was 25.88 (24.51, 27.33) and 3.47 (3.33, 3.62) for term infants. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy was the largest contributor to term brain injury, and intraventricular/periventricular haemorrhage was the largest contributor to preterm brain injury.Annual incidence rates for brain injuries can be estimated from data held in the NNRD; rates for individual conditions are consistent with published rates. Routinely recorded clinical data can be used for national surveillance, offering efficiencies over traditional approaches.

Journal article

Uthaya S, Liu X, Modi N, 2016, Nutritional Evaluation and Optimisation in Neonates trial: is the protein-to-energy ratio important? Reply, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 104, Pages: 1721-1722, ISSN: 0002-9165

Journal article

Uthaya SN, Liu X, Babalis D, Doré C, Warwick J, Bell J, Thomas E, Ashby D, Durighel G, Ederies A, Yanez-Lopez M, Modi Net al., 2016, Nutritional Evaluation and Optimisation in Neonates (NEON): a randomised double-blind controlled trial of amino-acid regimen and intravenous lipid composition in preterm parenteral nutrition, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol: 103, Pages: 1443-1452, ISSN: 1938-3207

BackgroundParenteral nutrition is central to the care of very immature infants. Current international recommendations favour higher amino-acid intakes and fish oil-containing lipid emulsions. ObjectiveThe aim of this two-by-two factorial, double-blind multicentre randomised controlled trial was to compare the effect of high (immediate Recommended Daily Intake: Imm-RDI) versus low (incremental introduction: Inc-AA) parenteral amino-acid delivery, commenced within 24 hours of birth, on body composition, and a multi-component lipid emulsion containing 30% soy bean oil, 30% medium chain triglycerides, 25% olive oil and 15% fish oil (SMOF) versus soybean oil based lipid emulsion (SO) on Intra-Hepato-Cellular Lipid (IHCL) content. ResultsWe randomised 168 infants born <31 weeks gestation. We evaluated outcomes at term in 133 infants. There were no significant differences between Imm-RDI and Inc-AA groups for non-adipose mass (adjusted mean difference (95% CI): 1.0g (-108, 111) p=0.98) or between SMOF and SO groups for IHCL (adjusted mean ratio SMOF:SO (95% CI): 1.1 (0.8, 1.6) p=0.58). SMOF does not affect IHCL content. There was a significant interaction (p=0.05) between the two interventions for non-adipose mass. There were no significant interactions between group differences for either primary outcome measure after adjusting for additional confounders. Imm-RDI infants were more likely than Inc-AA infants to have blood urea nitrogen levels greater than 7mmol/l or 10mmol/l respectively (75% vs 49%; p<0.01 and 49% vs 18%; p<0.01). Head circumference at term was smaller in the Imm-RDI group (mean difference (95% CI): -0.8cm (-1.5, -0.1) p= 0.02). There were no significant differences in any pre-specified secondary outcomes including adiposity, liver function tests, incidence of conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia, weight, length, mortality and brain volumes. ConclusionsImmediate delivery of Recommended Daily Intake of parenteral amino-acids does not benefit body compo

Journal article

Uthaya S, Liu X, Babalis D, Dore C, Warwick J, Bell J, Thomas L, Ashby D, Durighel G, Ederies A, Yanez-Lopez M, Modi Net al., 2016, Nutritional Evaluation and Optimisation in Neonates (NEON) trial of amino acid regimen and intravenous lipid composition in preterm parenteral nutrition: a randomised double-blind controlled trial, Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation, Vol: 3, ISSN: 2050-4365

BackgroundParenteral nutrition (PN) is central to the care of very immature infants. Early intakes of higher amounts of amino acids and the use of lipid emulsions containing fish oils are recommended by current international recommendations.ObjectiveTo confirm the safety and demonstrate efficacy of the immediate introduction of the recommended daily intake of amino acids (Imm-RDI) and soya bean oil, medium-chain triglycerides, olive oil and fish oil lipid in PN to increase non-adipose (lean) body mass and decrease intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL) content.DesignMulticentre, double-blind, 2 × 2 factorial and randomised controlled trial (RCT).SettingNeonatal units in London and south-east England, UK.ParticipantsExtremely preterm infants born before 31 weeks of gestation without major congenital or life-threatening abnormalities who could to be randomised to receive PN within 24 hours of birth.InterventionsInfants were randomised within 24 hours of birth to receive PN containing either high [RDI of amino acids (Imm-RDI)] or low [incremental amino acids (Inc-AA) control] levels of amino acids. In addition, infants were randomised to receive either 20% SMOFlipid® (Fresenius Kabi AG, Richmond Hill, ON, Canada) or 20% Intralipid® (Fresenius Kabi AG, Richmond Hill, ON, Canada) (control). This resulted in four groups: (1) Inc-AA/Intralipid, (2) Inc-AA/SMOFlipid, (3) Imm-RDI/Intralipid and (4) Imm-RDI/SMOFlipid. The intervention was continued until infants were receiving 150 ml/kg/day of enteral feeds for 24 hours.Primary outcome measureFor the amino acid intervention, this was non-adipose or lean body mass measured by magnetic resonance imaging. For the lipid composition intervention, this was IHCL content as measured by hepatic magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Primary outcomes were measured at term age equivalent, between 37 and 44 weeks postmenstrual age.ResultsWe randomised 168 infants born before 31 weeks of gestation. We evaluated outc

Journal article

Raban S, Santhakumaran S, Keraan Q, Joolay Y, Uthaya S, Horn A, Modi N, Harrison Met al., 2016, A randomised controlled trial of high vs low volume initiation and rapid vs slow advancement of milk feeds in infants with birthweights 1000 g in a resource-limited setting, Paediatrics and International Child Health, Vol: 36, Pages: 288-295, ISSN: 2046-9047

Background: Optimal feeding regimens for infants ≤ 1000 g have not been established and are a global healthcare concern.Aims and objectives: A controlled trial to establish the safety and efficacy of high vs low volume initiation and rapid vs slow advancement of milk feeds in a resource-limited setting was undertaken.Methods: Infants ≤ 1000 g birthweight were randomised to one of four arms, either low (4 ml/kg/day) or high (24 ml/kg/day) initiation and either slow (24 ml/kg/day) or rapid (36 ml/kg/day) advancement of exclusive feeds of human milk (mother’s or donor) until a weight of 1200 g was reached. After this point, formula was used to supplement insufficient mother’s milk. The primary outcome was time to reach 1500 g.Results: infants were recruited (51: low/slow; 47: low/rapid; 52: high/slow; 50: high/rapid). Infants on rapid advancement regimens reached 1500 g most rapidly (hazard ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.05–2.09, P=0.03). The rapid advancement groups also regained birthweight more rapidly (hazard ratio 1.77, 95% CI 1.26–2.50, P=0.001). There was no apparent effect of high vs low initiation volumes but there was some evidence of interaction between interventions. There were no significant differences in other secondary outcomes, including necrotising enterocolitis, feed intolerance and late-onset sepsis.Conclusions: In this small pilot study, higher initiation feed volumes and larger daily increments appeared to be well tolerated and resulted in more rapid early weight gain. These data provide justification for a larger study in resource-limited settings to address mortality, necrotising enterocolitis and other important outcomes.

Journal article

Sharma S, Varley J, Bell V, Uthaya S, Ayida Get al., 2015, Development of a smartphone app for new mums: an innovative information tool in a responsive maternity unit, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 374-375, ISSN: 1470-0328

Conference paper

Gale C, Logan KM, Jeffries S, Parkinson JRC, Santhakumaran S, Uthaya S, Durighel G, Alavi A, Thomas EL, Bell JD, Modi Net al., 2015, Sexual dimorphism in relation to adipose tissue and intrahepatocellular lipid deposition in early infancy, International Journal of Obesity, Vol: 39, Pages: 629-632, ISSN: 1476-5497

Journal article

Sharma S, Varley J, Bell V, Uthaya S, Ayida Get al., 2015, Development of a smartphone app for new mums: an innovative information tool in a responsive maternity unit, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 14-14, ISSN: 1470-0328

Conference paper

Uthaya S, Modi N, 2014, Practical preterm parenteral nutrition: Systematic literature review and recommendations for practice, EARLY HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 90, Pages: 747-753, ISSN: 0378-3782

Journal article

Gale C, Thomas EL, Jeffries S, Durighel G, Logan KM, Parkinson JRC, Uthaya S, Santhakumaran S, Bell JD, Modi Net al., 2014, Adiposity and hepatic lipid in healthy full-term, breastfed, and formula-fed human infants: a prospective short-term longitudinal cohort study (vol 99, pg 1034, 2014), AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 100, Pages: 1213-1213, ISSN: 0002-9165

Journal article

Uthaya S, Mancini A, Beardsley C, Wood D, Ranmal R, Modi Net al., 2014, Managing palliation in the neonatal unit, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD-FETAL AND NEONATAL EDITION, Vol: 99, Pages: F349-F352, ISSN: 1359-2998

Journal article

Gale C, Thomas EL, Jeffries S, Durighel G, Logan KM, Parkinson JRC, Uthaya S, Santhakumaran S, Bell JD, Modi Net al., 2014, Adiposity and hepatic lipid in healthy full-term, breastfed, and formula-fed human infants: a prospective short-term longitudinal cohort study, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol: 99, Pages: 1034-1040, ISSN: 0002-9165

Background: The effect of mode of infant feeding on adiposity deposition is not fully understood.Objective: The objective was to test the hypothesis that differences in total and regional adipose tissue content and intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL) arise in early infancy between breast- and formula-fed infants and to describe longitudinal changes.Design: This prospective longitudinal cohort study was performed in 2 hospitals in the United Kingdom. Healthy, full-term, appropriate weight-for-gestational age infants were recruited; adipose tissue volume and distribution were directly quantified by using whole-body magnetic resonance imaging; IHCL was assessed by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Measurements were performed after birth (median age: 13 d) and at 6–12 wk of age. Method of infant feeding was recorded prospectively by using maternally completed feeding diaries. Breastfed was defined as >80% of feeds consisting of breast milk at both points; formula-fed was defined as >80% of feeds consisting of formula milk at both points.Results: Longitudinal results were obtained from 70 infants (36 breastfed, 9 mixed-fed, and 25 formula-fed). No differences were found in total or regional adipose tissue or IHCL between breastfed and formula-fed infants. In pooled analyses including all feeding groups, IHCL and total adipose tissue approximately doubled between birth and 6–12 wk: IHCL after birth (median: 0.949; IQR: 0.521–1.711) and at 6–12 wk (1.828; 1.376–2.697; P < 0.001) and total adipose tissue after birth (0.749 L; 0.620–0.928 L) and at 6–12 wk (1.547 L; 1.332–1.790 L; P < 0.001). Increasing adiposity was characterized by greater relative increases in subcutaneous than in internal adipose tissue depots.Conclusions: No differences were detectable in adipose tissue or IHCL accretion between breastfed and formula-fed infants up to 2 mo. The substantial increase in IHCL seen over this period in bo

Journal article

Roberts I, Alford K, Hall G, Juban G, Richmond H, Norton A, Vallance G, Perkins K, Marchi E, McGowan S, Roy A, Cowan G, Anthony M, Gupta A, Ho J, Uthaya S, Curley A, Rasiah SV, Watts T, Nicholl R, Bedford-Russell A, Blumberg R, Thomas A, Gibson B, Halsey C, Lee P-W, Godambe S, Sweeney C, Bhatnagar N, Goriely A, Campbell P, Vyas Pet al., 2013, GATA1-mutant clones are frequent and often unsuspected in babies with Down syndrome: identification of a population at risk of leukemia, BLOOD, Vol: 122, Pages: 3908-3917, ISSN: 0006-4971

Journal article

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