Imperial College London

DrSharonTaylor

Faculty of MedicineFaculty of Medicine Centre

Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

sharon.taylor

 
 
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Location

 

31A0Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

26 results found

Rushforth A, Ladds E, Wieringa S, Taylor S, Husain L, Greenhalgh Tet al., 2021, Long Covid – The illness narratives, Social Science & Medicine, Vol: 286, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 0277-9536

Callard and Perego depict long Covid as the first illness to be defined by patients who came together on social media. Responding to their call to address why patients were so effective in making long Covid visible and igniting action to improve its care, we use narrative inquiry – a field of research that investigates the place and power of stories and storytelling. We analyse a large dataset of narrative interviews and focus groups with 114 people with long Covid (45 of whom were healthcare professionals) from the United Kingdom, drawing on socio-narratology (Frank), therapeutic emplotment (Mattingly) and polyphonia (Bakhtin). We describe how storytelling devices including chronology, metaphor, characterisation, suspense and imagination were used to create persuasive accounts of a strange and frightening new condition that was beset with setbacks and overlooked or dismissed by health professionals. The most unique feature of long Covid narratives (in most but not all cases) was the absence, for various pandemic-related reasons, of a professional witness to them. Instead of sharing their narratives in therapeutic dialogue with their own clinician, people struggled with a fragmented inner monologue before finding an empathetic audience and other resonant narratives in the online community. Individually, the stories seemed to make little sense. Collectively, they provided a rich description of the diverse manifestations of a grave new illness, a shared account of rejection by the healthcare system, and a powerful call for action to fix the broken story. Evolving from individual narrative postings to collective narrative drama, long Covid communities challenged the prevailing model of Covid-19 as a short-lived respiratory illness which invariably delivers a classic triad of symptoms; undertook and published peer-reviewed research to substantiate its diverse and protracted manifestations; and gained positions as experts by experience on guideline development grou

Journal article

Rosello R, Girela-Serrano B, Gomez S, Baig B, Lim M, Taylor Set al., 2021, Characterizing the features and course of psychiatric symptoms in children and adolescents with autoimmune encephalitis, EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF PSYCHIATRY AND CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE, ISSN: 0940-1334

Journal article

Ladds E, Rushforth A, Wieringa S, Taylor S, Rayner C, Husain L, Greenhalgh Tet al., 2021, Erratum: Developing services for long COVID: lessons from a study of wounded healers, Clinical Medicine, Vol: 21, Pages: 160-160, ISSN: 1470-2118

Journal article

Ladds E, Rushforth A, Wieringa S, Taylor S, Rayner C, Husain L, Greenhalgh Tet al., 2021, Developing services for long COVID: lessons from a study of wounded healers, Clinical Medicine, Vol: 21, Pages: 59-65, ISSN: 1470-2118

Journal article

Sivan M, Taylor S, 2020, NICE guideline on long covid, BMJ, Pages: m4938-m4938

Journal article

Ladds E, Rushforth A, Wieringa S, Taylor S, Rayner C, Husain L, Greenhalgh Tet al., 2020, Persistent symptoms after Covid-19: qualitative study of 114 “long Covid” patients and draft quality principles for services, BMC Health Services Research, Vol: 20

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec> <jats:title>Background</jats:title> <jats:p>Approximately 10% of patients with Covid-19 experience symptoms beyond 3–4 weeks. Patients call this “long Covid”. We sought to document such patients’ lived experience, including accessing and receiving healthcare and ideas for improving services.</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Methods</jats:title> <jats:p>We held 55 individual interviews and 8 focus groups (<jats:italic>n</jats:italic> = 59) with people recruited from UK-based long Covid patient support groups, social media and snowballing. We restricted some focus groups to health professionals since they had already self-organised into online communities. Participants were invited to tell their stories and comment on others’ stories. Data were audiotaped, transcribed, anonymised and coded using NVIVO. Analysis incorporated sociological theories of illness, healing, peer support, clinical relationships, access, and service redesign.</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>Of 114 participants aged 27–73 years, 80 were female. Eighty-four were White British, 13 Asian, 8 White Other, 5 Black, and 4 mixed ethnicity. Thirty-two were doctors and 19 other health professionals. Thirty-one had attended hospital, of whom 8 had been admitted. Analysis revealed a confusing illness with many, varied and often relapsing-remitting symptoms and uncertain prognosis; a heavy sense of loss and stigma; difficulty accessing and navigating services; difficulty being taken seriously and achieving a diagnosis; disjointed and siloed care (including inability to access specialist services); variation in standards (

Journal article

Taylor S, Suett J, Alwan NA, Blair JM, Bogaert D, Bowen M-Aet al., 2020, From doctors as patients: a manifesto for tackling persisting symptoms of covid-19, BMJ: British Medical Journal, ISSN: 0959-535X

Journal article

Lokugamage A, Taylor S, Raynor C, 2020, Patients’ experiences of “long covid” are missing from the NHS narrative, BMJ Open, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Taylor SE, Fiertag O, Tareen A, Garralda Eet al., 2020, Chapter Somatoform disorders., IACAPAP Textbook of child and adolescent mental health, Editors: Rey, Publisher: Open access publication

Book chapter

Taylor S, Fiertag O, Ninis N, Beri Set al., 2012, Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: an important differential diagnosis in psychosis. Response to Article. E- Letter, BJPsych Open, ISSN: 2056-4724

Journal article

Taylor S, Ani C, 2012, Emotions and Behaviour, Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics, ISBN: 9780723438748

Book chapter

Taylor S, 2011, When Actions Speak Louder than words, Context

Journal article

Taylor S, Haase S, Weaver T, Kidd J, Garralda EMet al., 2010, Child involvement in the paediatric consultation: a qualitative study of children and carers’ views, Child: Care, Health and Development, ISSN: 0305-1862

Journal article

Perera L, Taylor S, Laurent S, 2008, Implementing Paediatric Liaison: audit of staff perceptions and service use., Arch Dis Child, Vol: 93, Pages: 1077-1078

Journal article

Taylor S, Garralda ME, 2007, Emotions and behaviour, Illustrated Self Assessment in Paediatrics, Editors: Lissauer, Coren, Foster, Publisher: Mosby Incorporated, ISBN: 9780723431770

Companion to Illustrated textbook of paediatrics, Lissauer, 2nd ed., 2001.

Book chapter

Taylor S, Garralda E, 2007, Emotions and Behaviour, Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics, Editors: Lissauer, Clayden, Publisher: Elsevier,Urban&FischerVerlag, ISBN: 9783437410321

Book chapter

Nestel D, Taylor S, Spender Q, 2004, Evaluation of an inter-professional workshop to develop a psychosocial assessment and child-centred communication training programme for paediatricians in training., BMC Med Educ, Vol: 4

BACKGROUND: The quality of psychosocial assessment of children in consultations varies widely. One reason for this difference is the variability in effective mental health and communication training at undergraduate and post-qualification levels. In recognition of this problem, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health in the United Kingdom have developed the Child in Mind Project that aims to meet this deficit in medical training. This paper describes the evaluation of a workshop that explored the experiences and expectations of health care professionals in the development of a training programme for doctors. METHODS: The one-day inter-professional workshop was attended by 63 participants who were invited to complete evaluation forms before and immediately after the workshop. RESULTS: The results showed that the workshop was partially successful in providing an opportunity for an inter-professional group to exchange ideas and influence the development of a significant project. Exploring the content and process of the proposed training programme and the opportunity for participants to share experiences of effective practice were valued. Participants identified that the current culture within many health care settings would be an obstacle to successful implementation of a training programme. Working within existing training structures will be essential. Areas for improvement in the workshop included clearer statement of goals at the outset and a more suitable environment for the numbers of participants. CONCLUSIONS: The participants made a valuable contribution to the development of the training programme identifying specific challenges. Inter-professional collaborations are likely to result in more deliverable and relevant training programmes. Continued consultation with potential users of the programme - both trainers and trainees will be essential.

Journal article

Fellow-Smith E, Orr G, Ahmer S, Hepper F, Sohani M, Taylor S, Tolmac Jet al., 2004, Novel Specialist Registrar Leadership & Management Experience: A Work-based Experiential Learning Group, Clinician in Management, ISSN: 0965-5751

Journal article

Taylor S, Nunn K, Lask B, 2003, Practical Child Psychiatry The Clinician's Guide, Publisher: BMJ Books, ISBN: 9780727915931

Book

Taylor S, Garralda ME, 2003, The management of somatoform disorders, Current Opinion in Psychiatry, ISSN: 0951-7367

Journal article

Taylor SE, Garalda ME, Tudor-Williams G, Martinez-Alier Net al., 2003, An organic cause of neuropsychiatric illness in adolescence., Lancet, Vol: 361, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

Taylor S, Garralda E, Martinez-Alier N, Tudor-Williams Get al., 2003, An organic cause of neuropsychiatric illness in adolescence, Lancet

Journal article

, 2002, Sleep disturbance in children and adolescents with disorders of development: Its significance and management., Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol: 43, Pages: 827-828, ISSN: 0021-9630

Journal article

Taylor S, Dossetor DR, Kilham H, Bernard Eet al., 2000, The Youngest Case of Pervasive Refusal Syndrome?, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol: 5, Pages: 23-29, ISSN: 1359-1045

<jats:p> To date, the youngest previously recorded case of pervasive refusal syndrome (PRS) was eight years old. A four-year-old Australian-born Chinese boy presented to a tertiary paediatric referral centre with a four-week history of food refusal and selective mutism; he was severely dehydrated and marasmic. During admission several behavioural problems were noted including: persistent refusal to eat or drink, obsessions with images of food, failure to cooperate, lack of social interaction and toileting in inappropriate places. There were features of early maternal separation, concerns over the quality of parenting and confusion of language and culture. An exhaustive assessment (to exclude an organic explanation) by a multi- disciplinary team was completed. All investigations were normal with the exception of the single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scan, which showed mild increase uptake to the right insular and mild decrease uptake to the right temporal region. He was hospitalized for 67 days over which time his medical difficulties resolved. The differential diagnosis included an organic disease, child abuse, an eating disorder, a degenerative disorder, reactive attachment disorder, pervasive developmental disorder and a psychotic disorder, which were all considered. We felt that this case fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for PRS and was the youngest reported case. The similarity of the SPECT scan result with that found in anorexia nervosa is of interest and suggests that there is a neurobiological vulnerability common to this group of disorders. </jats:p>

Journal article

Taylor S, Raffles A, 1997, Pediatrics, Publisher: Mosby, ISBN: 9780723424949

This atlas helps the clinician make a swift diagnosis by showing typical presentations of the most encountered pediatric disorders, logically organized and illustrated by top-quality clinical photos.

Book

Nurek M, Rayner C, Freyer A, Taylor S, Järte L, MacDermott N, Delaney BCet al., Recommendations for the Recognition, Diagnosis, and Management of Patients with Post COVID-19 Condition ('Long COVID'): A Delphi Study, SSRN Electronic Journal

Journal article

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