Imperial College London

DrTimothyEbbels

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction

Reader in Computational Bioinformatics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3160t.ebbels Website

 
 
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Location

 

131Sir Alexander Fleming BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Gibson:2019:ajcn/nqz293,
author = {Gibson, R and Lau, C and Loo, RL and Ebbels, T and Chekmeneva, E and Dyer, A and Miura, K and Ueshima, H and Zhao, L and Daviglus, M and Stamler, J and Van, Horn L and Elliott, P and Holmes, E and Chan, Q},
doi = {ajcn/nqz293},
journal = {American Journal of Clinical Nutrition},
title = {The association of fish consumption and its urinary metabolites with cardiovascular risk factors: The International Study of Macro-/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP)},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqz293},
year = {2019}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - BackgroundResults from observational studies regarding associations between fish (including shellfish) intake and cardiovascular disease risk factors, including blood pressure (BP) and BMI, are inconsistent.ObjectiveTo investigate associations of fish consumption and associated urinary metabolites with BP and BMI in free-living populations.MethodsWe used cross-sectional data from the International Study of Macro-/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP), including 4680 men and women (40–59 y) from Japan, China, the United Kingdom, and United States. Dietary intakes were assessed by four 24-h dietary recalls and BP from 8 measurements. Urinary metabolites (2 timed 24-h urinary samples) associated with fish intake acquired from NMR spectroscopy were identified. Linear models were used to estimate BP and BMI differences across categories of intake and per 2 SD higher intake of fish and its biomarkers.ResultsNo significant associations were observed between fish intake and BP. There was a direct association with fish intake and BMI in the Japanese population sample (P trend = 0.03; fully adjusted model). In Japan, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and taurine, respectively, demonstrated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values of 0.81 and 0.78 in discriminating high against low fish intake, whereas homarine (a metabolite found in shellfish muscle) demonstrated an AUC of 0.80 for high/nonshellfish intake. Direct associations were observed between urinary TMAO and BMI for all regions except Japan (P < 0.0001) and in Western populations between TMAO and BP (diastolic blood pressure: mean difference 1.28; 95% CI: 0.55, 2.02 mmHg; P = 0.0006, systolic blood pressure: mean difference 1.67; 95% CI: 0.60, 2.73 mmHg; P = 0.002).ConclusionsUrinary TMAO showed a stronger association with fish intake in the Japanese compared with the Western population sample. Urinary TMAO was directly associated with BP in the Western but not the Japanese popula
AU - Gibson,R
AU - Lau,C
AU - Loo,RL
AU - Ebbels,T
AU - Chekmeneva,E
AU - Dyer,A
AU - Miura,K
AU - Ueshima,H
AU - Zhao,L
AU - Daviglus,M
AU - Stamler,J
AU - Van,Horn L
AU - Elliott,P
AU - Holmes,E
AU - Chan,Q
DO - ajcn/nqz293
PY - 2019///
SN - 0002-9165
TI - The association of fish consumption and its urinary metabolites with cardiovascular risk factors: The International Study of Macro-/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP)
T2 - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqz293
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/75333
ER -