Imperial College London

DrTimothyEbbels

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction

Reader in Computational Bioinformatics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3160t.ebbels Website

 
 
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Location

 

131Sir Alexander Fleming BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Kauffmann:2017:10.1016/j.yrtph.2017.10.007,
author = {Kauffmann, H-M and Kamp, H and Fuchs, R and Chorley, BN and Deferme, L and Ebbels, T and Hackermueller, J and Perdichizzi, S and Poole, A and Sauer, UG and Tollefsen, KE and Tralau, T and Yauk, C and van, Ravenzwaay B},
doi = {10.1016/j.yrtph.2017.10.007},
journal = {Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology},
pages = {S27--S35},
title = {Framework for the quality assurance of 'omics technologies considering GLP requirements},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yrtph.2017.10.007},
volume = {91},
year = {2017}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - ‘Omics technologies are gaining importance to support regulatory toxicity studies. Prerequisites for performing ‘omics studies considering GLP principles were discussed at the European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) Workshop Applying ‘omics technologies in Chemical Risk Assessment. A GLP environment comprises a standard operating procedure system, proper pre-planning and documentation, and inspections of independent quality assurance staff. To prevent uncontrolled data changes, the raw data obtained in the respective ‘omics data recording systems have to be specifically defined. Further requirements include transparent and reproducible data processing steps, and safe data storage and archiving procedures. The software for data recording and processing should be validated, and data changes should be traceable or disabled. GLP-compliant quality assurance of ‘omics technologies appears feasible for many GLP requirements. However, challenges include (i) defining, storing, and archiving the raw data; (ii) transparent descriptions of data processing steps; (iii) software validation; and (iv) ensuring complete reproducibility of final results with respect to raw data. Nevertheless, ‘omics studies can be supported by quality measures (e.g., GLP principles) to ensure quality control, reproducibility and traceability of experiments. This enables regulators to use ‘omics data in a fit-for-purpose context, which enhances their applicability for risk assessment.
AU - Kauffmann,H-M
AU - Kamp,H
AU - Fuchs,R
AU - Chorley,BN
AU - Deferme,L
AU - Ebbels,T
AU - Hackermueller,J
AU - Perdichizzi,S
AU - Poole,A
AU - Sauer,UG
AU - Tollefsen,KE
AU - Tralau,T
AU - Yauk,C
AU - van,Ravenzwaay B
DO - 10.1016/j.yrtph.2017.10.007
EP - 35
PY - 2017///
SN - 0273-2300
SP - 27
TI - Framework for the quality assurance of 'omics technologies considering GLP requirements
T2 - Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yrtph.2017.10.007
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/56974
VL - 91
ER -