Imperial College London

Dr Thomas M Davison

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Earth Science & Engineering

Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2019thomas.davison Website CV

 
 
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Location

 

4.94Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Summary

  • Research Fellow, Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, 2018-present
  • Research Associate, Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, 2013-2018
  • Arthur H. Compton Lecturer, Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 2012
  • Postdoctoral Research Scholar, Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 2011-2013
  • PhD: Numerical modelling of heat generation in porous planetesimal collisions, Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, 2007-2010
  • MSci (Hons): Geology and Geophysics, Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, 2002-2006

Research Interests

My research interests focus on early Solar System processes. I aim to understand the evolution of the first solid bodies that formed around our Sun. These bodies, called planetesimals, were the building blocks of planets; those that remain in the Solar System today are known as asteroids. In my research, I use numerical models to quantify the collateral effects of hypervelocity collisions between planetesimals on their thermal and compaction histories. Projects that I am interested in include:

  • Simulations of collisions between self-gravitating porous planetesimals and the subsequent evolution of the thermal signatures left by impacts
  • Monte Carlo modelling to estimate the early impact histories of meteorite parent bodies
  • Mesoscale numerical modelling of compaction in primitive Solar System materials
  • Investigation of the effects of impact angle and target curvature upon cratering processes, including impact heating and crater morphology
  • Validation of the iSALE and iSALE3D hydrocodes against laboratory experiments
  • Numerical modelling of impacts into the oceans to determine the effect of the water depth on crater size and morphology