Imperial College London

DrVanessaGarcia Larsen

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Honorary Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7945vgla

 
 
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Location

 

61Emmanuel Kaye BuildingRoyal Brompton Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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135 results found

Bedard A, Accordini S, Carsin A-E, Dharmage S, Fuertes E, Garcia-Larsen V, Heinrich J, Janson C, Jarvis D, Johannessen A, Leynaert B, Maldonado Perez JA, Prado Peralta G, Pin I, Squillacioti G, Weyler J, Garcia-Aymerich Jet al., 2019, Is the association between physical activity and lung function due to reverse causation? application of exploratory and causal approaches, European-Respiratory-Society (ERS) International Congress, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Fuertes E, Carsin A-E, Garcia-Larsen V, Guerra S, Pin I, Leynaert B, Accordini S, Martinez-Moratalla J, Antó JM, Urrutia I, Le Gouellec A, Heinrich J, Gislason T, Jõgi R, Janson C, Jarvis D, Garcia-Aymerich Jet al., 2019, The role of C-reactive protein levels on the association of physical activity with lung function in adults, PLoS One, Vol: 14, ISSN: 1932-6203

ObjectiveRegular physical activity may be associated with improved lung function via reduced systemic inflammation, although studies exploring this mechanism are rare. We evaluated the role of C-reactive protein in blood, which is a common marker of systemic inflammation, on the association of physical activity with forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity.MethodsCross-sectional data on spirometry, C-reactive protein levels and self-reported physical activity (yes/no; ≥2 times and ≥1hr per week of vigorous physical activity) were available in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (N = 2347 adults, 49.3% male, 28–56 years-old). A subsample was also assessed 10 years later using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and tertiles of Metabolic Equivalent of Task—minutes per week spent in vigorous, moderate and walking activities were calculated (N = 671, 49.6% male, 40–67 years-old). Adjusted cross-sectional mixed linear regression models and the “mediate” package in “R” were used to assess the presence of mediation.ResultsDespite positive significant associations between nearly all physical activity metrics with forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity, there was no evidence that C-reactive protein levels played a role. An influence of C-reactive protein levels was only apparent in the smaller subsample when comparing the medium to low tertiles of moderate activity (mean difference [95% CIs]: 21.1ml [5.2, 41.9] for forced expiratory volume in one second and 17.3ml [2.6, 38.0] for forced vital capacity).ConclusionsIn a population of adults, we found no consistent evidence that the association of physical activity with forced expiratory volume in one second or forced vital capacity is influenced by the level of C-reactive protein in blood.

Journal article

Kim H, Caulfield LE, Garcia-Larsen V, Steffen LM, Coresh J, Rebholz CMet al., 2019, Plant-based diets are associated with a lower risk of incident cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease mortality, and all-cause mortality in a general population of middle-aged adults, Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2047-9980

Background Previous studies have documented the cardiometabolic health benefits of plant-based diets; however, these studies were conducted in selected study populations that had narrow generalizability. Methods and Results We used data from a community-based cohort of middle-aged adults (n=12 168) in the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study who were followed up from 1987 through 2016. Participants' diet was classified using 4 diet indexes. In the overall plant-based diet index and provegetarian diet index, higher intakes of all or selected plant foods received higher scores; in the healthy plant-based diet index, higher intakes of only the healthy plant foods received higher scores; in the less healthy plant-based diet index, higher intakes of only the less healthy plant foods received higher scores. In all indexes, higher intakes of animal foods received lower scores. Results from Cox proportional hazards models showed that participants in the highest versus lowest quintile for adherence to overall plant-based diet index or provegetarian diet had a 16%, 31% to 32%, and 18% to 25% lower risk of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease mortality, and all-cause mortality, respectively, after adjusting for important confounders (all P<0.05 for trend). Higher adherence to a healthy plant-based diet index was associated with a 19% and 11% lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and all-cause mortality, respectively, but not incident cardiovascular disease (P<0.05 for trend). No associations were observed between the less healthy plant-based diet index and the outcomes. Conclusions Diets higher in plant foods and lower in animal foods were associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in a general population.

Journal article

Margarida Silva D, Moreira R, Beltrao M, Sokhatska O, Montanha T, Pizarro A, Garcia-Larsen V, Villegas R, Severo M, Delgado L, Moreira P, Carvalho J, Moreira Aet al., 2019, Exercise and physical activity impact on the allostatic load: Evidence from a two steps clinical trial, Congress of the European-Academy-of-Allergy-and-Clinical-Immunology (EAACI), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 453-453, ISSN: 0105-4538

Conference paper

Saglimbene V, Wong G, Ruospo M, Palmer S, Natale P, Garcia-Larsen V, Carrero JJ, Stenvinkel P, Gargano L, Tonelli M, Bernat A, Timofte D, Torok M, Bednarek-Skublewska A, Dulawa J, Stroumza P, Wollheim C, Hegbrant J, Craig J, Strippoli Get al., 2019, DIETARY PATTERNS AND MORTALITY IN ADULTS ON HEMODIALYSIS, 56th Congress of the European-Renal-Association (ERA)-European-Dialysis-and-Transplant-Association (EDTA) - Burden, Access and Disparities in Kidney Disease, Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, ISSN: 0931-0509

Conference paper

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