Imperial College London

DrWouterBuytaert

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Reader in Hydrology and Water Resources
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1329w.buytaert Website

 
 
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Assistant

 

Miss Judith Barritt +44 (0)20 7594 5967

 
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Location

 

403ASkempton BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

107 results found

Regmi S, Bhusal J, Gurung P, Zulkafli Z, Karpouzoglou T, Tocachi BO, Buytaert W, Mao Fet al., Learning to cope with water variability through participatory monitoring: The case study of the Mountainous region, Nepal, Meteorology Hydrology and Water Management, ISSN: 2299-3835

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ochoa-Tocachi BF, Alemie TC, Guzman CD, Tilahun SA, Zimale FA, Buytaert W, Steenhuis TSet al., 2019, Sensitivity analysis of the parameter-efficient distributed (PED) model for discharge and sediment concentration estimation in degraded humid landscapes, LAND DEGRADATION & DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 30, Pages: 151-165, ISSN: 1085-3278

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Grainger S, Hommes L, Karpouzoglou T, Perez K, Buytaert W, Dewulf Aet al., 2019, The development and intersection of highland-coastal scale frames: a case study of water governance in central Peru, Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN: 1523-908X

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Scale framing makes an important difference to how complex environmental policy issues are defined and understood by different groups of actors. Increasing urban water demand and uncertain future climatic conditions in the Andes present major water governance challenges for the coastal regions of Peru. An understudied dimension of Peruvian water governance is how scale framing shapes the way problems are defined, and solutions are pursued. Here, we aim to strengthen the understanding of scale framing as it relates to highland-coastal interactions in central Peru between 2004 and 2015. By analysing this period of significant water governance reforms, we identify five prominent water-related frame dimensions and three differently scaled policy storylines and reveal how they developed and intersected over time. The storylines, supported by particular visualisations, either foreground ‘urbanshed’-level investment in water supply infrastructure, community-level cultural restoration for improved local agricultural production, or nationwide watershed-level financial mechanisms for highland ecosystem conservation. Our study shows how the intersection of these storylines at different moments during the policy process often had a strengthening effect, creating a coalition of actors who were then able to generate sufficient momentum and support within the Peruvian government for the implementation of conservation-based watershed investments.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Agrawal S, Chakraborty A, Karmakar N, Moulds S, Mijic A, Buytaert Wet al., 2019, Effects of winter and summer-time irrigation over Gangetic Plain on the mean and intra-seasonal variability of Indian summer monsoon, Climate Dynamics, ISSN: 0930-7575

© 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. The decreasing trend in rainfall in the last few decades over the Indo-Gangetic Plains of northern India as observed in ground-based observations puts increasing stress on groundwater because irrigation uses up to 70% of freshwater resources. In this work, we have analyzed the effects of extensive irrigation over the Gangetic Plains on the seasonal mean and intra-seasonal variability of the Indian summer monsoon, using a general circulation model and a very high-resolution soil moisture dataset created using extensive field observations in a state-of-the-art hydrological model. We find that the winter-time (November–March) irrigation has a positive feedback on the Indian summer monsoon through large scale circulation changes. These changes are analogous to a positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) phase during winter months. The effects of the positive NAO phase persist from winter to spring through widespread changes in surface conditions over western and central Asia, which makes the pre-monsoon conditions suitable for a subsequent good monsoon over India. Winter-time irrigation also resulted in a reduction of low frequency intra-seasonal variability over the Indian region during the monsoon season. However, when irrigation is practiced throughout the year, a decrease in June–September precipitation over the Gangetic Plains, significant at 95% level, is noted as compared to the no-irrigation scenario. This decrease is attributed to the increase in local soil moisture due to irrigation, which results in a southward shift of the moisture convergence zone during the active phase of monsoon, decreasing its mean and intraseasonal variability. Interestingly, these changes show a remarkable similarity to the long-term trend in observed rainfall spatial pattern and low-frequency variability. Our results suggest that with a decline in the mean summer precipitation and stressed groundwater res

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Buytaert W, Vitolo C, Fry M, Spencer M, Gauster Tet al., 2018, cvitolo/rnrfa: rnrfa v1.5

rnrfa: An R package to Retrieve, Filter and Visualize Data from the UK National River Flow Archive

SOFTWARE

De Stercke S, Mijic A, Buytaert W, Chaturvedi Vet al., 2018, Modelling the dynamic interactions between London's water and energy systems from an end-use perspective, APPLIED ENERGY, Vol: 230, Pages: 615-626, ISSN: 0306-2619

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Shukla AK, Ojha CSP, Mijic A, Buytaert W, Pathak S, Garg RD, Shukla Set al., 2018, Population growth, land use and land cover transformations, and water quality nexus in the Upper Ganga River basin, HYDROLOGY AND EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCES, Vol: 22, Pages: 4745-4770, ISSN: 1027-5606

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Moulds S, Buytaert W, Mijic A, 2018, A spatio-temporal land use and land cover reconstruction for India from 1960-2010, SCIENTIFIC DATA, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2052-4463

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Zogheib C, Ochoa-Tocachi BF, Paul JD, Hannah DM, Clark J, Buytaert Wet al., 2018, Exploring a water data, evidence, and governance theory, Water Security, Vol: 4-5, Pages: 19-25

© 2018 The hydrological evidence on which water resource management and broader governance decisions are based is often very limited. This issue is especially pronounced in lower- and middle-income countries, where not only data are scarce but where pressure on water resources is often already very high and increasing. Historically, several governance theories have been put forward to examine water resource management. One of the more influential is Elinor Ostrom's theory of common-pool resources. However while used very widely, the underlying principles of Ostrom's approach make pronounced implicit assumptions about the role of data and evidence in common-pool resource systems. We argue here this overlooks how power relations, user characteristics, system arrangements, and technological advances modulate fundamental associations between data, evidence, and governance, which we contend need to be considered explicitly. Examining the case of water allocations in Quito, Ecuador, we develop a set of concrete criteria to inform the ways in which Ostrom's principles can be applied in a data-scarce, institutionally complex, polycentric context. By highlighting the variable impact of data availability on subsequent evidence generation, these criteria have the potential to test the applicability of common assumptions about how to achieve water security in a developmental context, and hence offer the possibility of developing a more encompassing theory about the interactions between water data, evidence, and governance.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Mao F, Clark J, Buytaert W, Krause S, Hannah DMet al., 2018, Water sensor network applications: Time to move beyond the technical?, HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, Vol: 32, Pages: 2612-2615, ISSN: 0885-6087

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ochoa-Tocachi BF, Buytaert W, Antiporta J, Acosta L, Bardales JD, Celleri R, Crespo P, Fuentes P, Gil-Rios J, Guallpa M, Llerena C, Olaya D, Pardo P, Rojas G, Villacis M, Villazon M, Vinas P, De Bievre Bet al., 2018, High-resolution hydrometeorological data from a network of headwater catchments in the tropical Andes, SCIENTIFIC DATA, Vol: 5

JOURNAL ARTICLE

O'Keeffe J, Moulds S, Bergin E, Brozovic N, Mijic A, Buytaert Wet al., 2018, Including Farmer Irrigation Behavior in a Sociohydrological Modeling Framework With Application in North India, WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, Vol: 54, Pages: 4849-4866, ISSN: 0043-1397

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Buytaert W, Ochoa Tocachi B, Hannah DM, Clark J, Dewulf Aet al., 2018, Co-generating knowledge on ecosystem services and the role of new technologies, Ecosystem Services and Poverty Alleviation: Trade-offs and Governance, Editors: Schreckenberg, Mace, Poudyal, London, Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group, Pages: 174-188, ISBN: 9780429016295

Policy makers are increasingly aware that decision-making in the context of ecosystem services management, and of development, can benefit from collaborative and inclusive approaches to knowledge generation and the design of intervention strategies, such as by providing a more prominent role for indigenous knowledge in decision-making and by using participatory methods for data collection and knowledge generation. In this chapter, we discuss how technologies such as mobile phones, low-cost and robust sensors, and increasingly pervasive remote-sensing satellites and drones can be particularly transformative in the way they facilitate the creation, access and transmission of information about ecosystem services, and support evidence-based decision-making. Furthermore, we discuss how these technologies can be used to promote stakeholder involvement in the knowledge generation process and to make it more inclusive and participatory. While we highlight potential risks related to the use of new technologies, such as exploitation by specific stakeholders to support specific agendas or interests, we identify opportunities for an increasing diversification and tailoring of knowledge creation, moving away from a top-down process dominated by scientists and toward more decentralised, bottom-up and iterative approaches that can have a transformative impact on local ecosystem services management, making it more inclusive, polycentric, evidence-based and robust.

BOOK CHAPTER

Appel M, Lahn F, Buytaert W, Pebesma Eet al., 2018, Open and scalable analytics of large Earth observation datasets: From scenes to multidimensional arrays using SciDB and GDAL, ISPRS JOURNAL OF PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND REMOTE SENSING, Vol: 138, Pages: 47-56, ISSN: 0924-2716

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Tsarouchi G, Buytaert W, 2018, Land-use change may exacerbate climate change impacts on water resources in the Ganges basin, HYDROLOGY AND EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCES, Vol: 22, Pages: 1411-1435, ISSN: 1027-5606

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pascual U, Howe C, 2018, Seeing the wood for the trees: Exploring the evolution of frameworks of ecosystem services for human wellbeing, Ecosystem Services and Poverty Alleviation: Trade-Offs and Governance, Pages: 3-21, ISBN: 9781138580831

© 2018 selection and editorial matter, Kate Schreckenberg, Georgina Mace and Mahesh Poudyal; individual chapters, the contributors. Ecosystem service frameworks connect with different societal goals and priorities regarding ecosystem management and development planning, and thus reflect the different epistemic communities from which they arise. Since the publication of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA), ecosystem service framing has undergone a significant evolution and this evolution has, in turn, continued to reshape the epistemic communities and their take on policy instruments, including for example payments for ecosystem services. This chapter explores the development of ecosystem services framings over the last decade, focusing on how the ecosystem service frameworks, such as the UN-led Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB), the UK-led Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme and the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), have significantly influenced how we conceptualise and use the ecosystem service approach. Through an exploration of the evolution of ecosystem service and well-being framings, the chapter highlights that there has been a substantial shift towards seeing ecosystem services through a richer lens, departing from a mostly supply (biophysical) perspective to a more balanced social-ecological perspective, including the issues of equity and justice in ecosystem governance, and a pluralistic conceptualisation of values.

BOOK CHAPTER

Paul JD, Buytaert W, Allen S, Ballesteros-Canovas JA, Bhusal J, Cieslik K, Clark J, Dugar S, Hannah DM, Stoffel M, Dewulf A, Dhital MR, Liu W, Nayaval JL, Neupane B, Schiller A, Smith PJ, Supper Ret al., 2018, Citizen science for hydrological risk reduction and resilience building, WILEY INTERDISCIPLINARY REVIEWS-WATER, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2049-1948

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Vuille M, Carey M, Huggel C, Buytaert W, Rabatel A, Jacobsen D, Soruco A, Villacis M, Yarleque C, Timm OE, Condom T, Salzmann N, Sicart J-Eet al., 2018, Rapid decline of snow and ice in the tropical Andes - Impacts, uncertainties and challenges ahead, EARTH-SCIENCE REVIEWS, Vol: 176, Pages: 195-213, ISSN: 0012-8252

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ochoa Tocachi BF, Buytaert W, De Bièvre B, 2017, Participatory Monitoring of the Impact of Watershed Interventions in the Tropical Andes, Andean Hydrology, Editors: Rivera, Godoy-Faundez, Lillo Saavedra, Publisher: CRC Press, Pages: 126-163, ISBN: 9781498788403

This chapter documents the motivations and methods of the Regional Initiative for Hydrological Monitoring of Andean Ecosystems (iMHEA). First, it introduces the context that led to the formation of a diverse consortium of institutions with a joint interest in Andean ecosystems and water. The methodological approach adopted by the monitoring network is then presented in detail. Lastly, this chapter shows preliminary main results, the most relevant milestones and breakthroughs, and the major remaining challenges and perspectives in the scientific, technological and social domains. The objective of the monitoring, as promoted by iMHEA, is to generate standardized data that can be used to increase the knowledge about hydrological ecosystem services in Andean watersheds and the impacts of watershed interventions. The correct use of the generated knowledge, from community level to national governance entities, proves crucial to increase catchment intervention efficiency and improve decision-making on water resources management in data-scarce regions, with potential application to other regions of the world.

BOOK CHAPTER

Fernanda Cardenas M, Tobon C, Buytaert W, 2017, Contribution of occult precipitation to the water balance of paramo ecosystems in the Colombian Andes, HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, Vol: 31, Pages: 4440-4449, ISSN: 0885-6087

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Buytaert W, Moulds S, Acosta L, De Bievre B, Olmos C, Villacis M, Tovar C, Verbist KMJet al., 2017, Glacial melt content of water use in the tropical Andes, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1748-9326

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Arnillas CA, Tovar C, Cadotte MW, Buytaert Wet al., 2017, From patches to richness: assessing the potential impact of landscape transformation on biodiversity, ECOSPHERE, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2150-8925

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Shukla AK, Ojha CSP, Mijic A, Buytaert W, Pathak S, Garg RD, Shukla Set al., Population Growth–Land Use/Land Cover Transformations–Water Quality Nexus in Upper Ganga River Basin, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, Pages: 1-46

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Manz B, Paez-Bimos S, Horna N, Buytaert W, Ochoa-Tocachi B, Lavado-Casimiro W, Willems Bet al., 2017, Comparative Ground Validation of IMERG and TMPA at Variable Spatiotemporal Scales in the Tropical Andes, JOURNAL OF HYDROMETEOROLOGY, Vol: 18, Pages: 2469-2489, ISSN: 1525-755X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Mathez-Stiefel S-L, Peralvo M, Baez S, Rist S, Buytaert W, Cuesta F, Fadrique B, Feeley KJ, Groth AAP, Homeier J, Llambi LD, Locatelli B, Lopez Sandoval F, Malizia A, Young KRet al., 2017, Research Priorities for the Conservation and Sustainable Governance of Andean Forest Landscapes, MOUNTAIN RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 37, Pages: 323-339, ISSN: 0276-4741

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Mao F, Clark J, Karpouzoglou T, Dewulf A, Buytaert W, Hannah Det al., 2017, HESS Opinions: A conceptual framework for assessing socio-hydrological resilience under change, HYDROLOGY AND EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCES, Vol: 21, Pages: 3655-3670, ISSN: 1027-5606

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Arora H, Ojha CSP, Buytaert W, Kaushika GS, Sharma Cet al., Spatio-temporal trends in observed and downscaled precipitation over Ganga Basin, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, Pages: 1-19

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ocio D, Le Vine N, Westerberg I, Pappenberger F, Buytaert Wet al., 2017, The role of rating curve uncertainty in real-time flood forecasting, WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, Vol: 53, Pages: 4197-4213, ISSN: 0043-1397

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Huss M, Bookhagen B, Huggel C, Jacobsen D, Bradley RS, Clague JJ, Vuille M, Buytaert W, Cayan DR, Greenwood G, Mark BG, Milner AM, Weingartner R, Winder Met al., 2017, Toward mountains without permanent snow and ice, EARTHS FUTURE, Vol: 5, Pages: 418-435, ISSN: 2328-4277

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pandeya B, Buytaert W, 2017, Citizen science and web-based modelling tools for managing freshwater

The use of low-cost hydrological sensors in Nepal allowed local stakeholders to generate useful data on freshwater resources in partnership with scientists, and to apply this data more effectively in participatory decision making.It is important to use the right mapping and modelling methods for ecosystem services (the benefits people obtain from ecosystems) so that information on service production, distribution and consumption is expressed at a spatial scale that is relevant to decision making. These methods are even more important in regions where limited data is available.The integration of appropriate citizen science practices as well as mapping and modelling tools into water and land resources based decision making could facilitate sustainable development activities, particularly in the Himalayan region.

OTHER

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