Imperial College London

Dr William R Sheate

Faculty of Natural SciencesCentre for Environmental Policy

Reader in Environmental Assessment
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 9299w.sheate

 
 
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Location

 

110AWeeks BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

107 results found

Aquilina MC, Sheate WR, 2021, A critical analysis of the role of the urban climate resilience nexus in London, European Planning Studies, Pages: 1-23, ISSN: 0965-4313

Although London boasts ambitious climate resilience (CR) targets, implementation has so far been unconvincing, in part due to a lack of integration between policy areas. Nexus thinking focuses on the interlinkages between policy areas to overcome silos which inhibit policy integration. Green infrastructure, sustainable transport and urban form can all result in CR, however an integrated approach to these areas is not evident in the London context. This article explores their role through a nexus lens, the urban climate resilience (UCR) nexus, by focusing on policy implementation in the Boroughs of Greenwich and Southwark. The research is two-tiered, firstly, through policy analysis, used to understand how current policy performs in relation to the UCR nexus, as well as informing the second phase of semi-structured expert interviews to investigate the structures in place to deliver policy. Despite little evidence of nexus thinking, London does have innovative solutions to policy integration, particularly through sustainable transport projects. However, Greenwich and Southwark demonstrate resource and governance issues that inhibit delivery. Nexus thinking can be the catalyst to support delivery; although more innovative approaches to valuation methods, partnership delivery, monitoring and evidence are imperative if the UCR nexus is to be harnessed to deliver CR.

Journal article

Thiermann UB, Sheate WR, 2021, The Way Forward in Mindfulness and Sustainability: a Critical Review and Research Agenda, JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE ENHANCEMENT, Vol: 5, Pages: 118-139, ISSN: 2509-3290

Journal article

Sheate WR, Twigger-Ross C, Papadopoulou L, Sadauskis R, White O, Orr P, Eales Ret al., 2020, Learning lessons for evaluating complexity across the nexus: a meta-evaluation of environmental projects, Journal of MultiDisciplinary Evaluation, Vol: 16, Pages: 1-19, ISSN: 1556-8180

Background: A major gap in environmental policy making is learning lessons from past interventions and in integrating the lessons from evaluations that have been undertaken. Institutional memory of such evaluations often resides externally to government, in evaluation practitioner contractors who undertake commissioned evaluations on behalf of government departments.Purpose: The aims were to learn the lessons from past policy evaluations, understand the barriers and enablers to successful evaluations, to explore the value of different types of approaches and methods used for evaluating complexity, and how evaluations were used in practice. Setting: A meta-evaluation of 23 environmental evaluations undertaken by Collingwood Environmental Planning Ltd (CEP), London, UK was undertaken by CEP staff under the auspices of CECAN (the Centre for Evaluation of Complexity Across the Nexus – a UK Research Councils funded centre, coordinated by the University of Surrey, UK). The research covered water, environment and climate change nexus issues, including evaluations of flood risk, biodiversity, landscape, land use, climate change, catchment management, community resilience, bioenergy, and European Union (EU) Directives.

Journal article

Thiermann UB, Sheate WR, Vercammen A, 2020, Practice Matters: Pro-environmental Motivations and Diet-Related Impact Vary With Meditation Experience, FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1664-1078

Journal article

Thiermann UB, Sheate WR, 2020, Motivating individuals for social transition: The 2-pathway model and experiential strategies for pro-environmental behaviour, ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS, Vol: 174, ISSN: 0921-8009

Journal article

Benini L, Viaud V, 2020, Drivers of change of relevance for Europe's environment and sustainability, Luxembourg, Publisher: Publications Office of the European Union, EEA Report 25/2019

Report

McGuinn J, Oul├Ęs L, Banfi P, McNeill A, OBrien S, Lukakova Z, Sheate W, Kolaric S, Sadauskis Ret al., 2019, Study to support the REFIT evaluation of Directive 2001/42/EC on the assessment of the effects of certain plans and programmes on the environment (SEA Directive) Final report, Publisher: European Commission

This evaluation study supports the evaluation of Directive 2001/42/EC on the assessment of the effects of certain public plans and programmes on the environment (SEA Directive) as part of the European Commission's Regulatory Fitness Check and Performance (REFIT) programme. This assessment is based on five evaluation criteria: effectiveness, efficiency, relevance, coherence and EU added value. The study found that the SEA Directive brings considerable benefits to the EU, contributing to wider goals on sustainable development and environmental protection through integration of environmental concerns into the appropriate plans and programmes. The study however raised some issues of concern limiting the Directive’s potential to achieve its objectives in an efficient way: uncertainties about the scope of application and the risk of ensuing legal challenges; the challenges in the application of the Directive to strategic planning addressing global and longer term sustainability challenges; the necessity for a flexible application of the SEA procedure and a more efficient practice, in particular in the drafting of environmental reports. The study also identified a few priority issues that should be considered for further action: the clarification of the scope of application of the Directive, a more strategic approach to scoping and the dissemination of good practices.

Working paper

White O, Sadauskis R, Sheate WR, Papadopoulou L, Künitzer Aet al., 2018, Water Use in the Western Balkans: regional outlooks and global megatrends, Water Use in the Western Balkans: regional outlooks and global megatrends, Magdeburg, Publisher: European Topic Centre on inland, coastal and marine waters, ETC/ICM Technical Report 2/2018

Following a thematic focus on water in relation to energy and food trade-offs this report adapts and applies the methodology ‘Mapping Europe’s Future: understanding the impacts of global megatrends at the national level’ to a case study for the Western Balkans to understand the impacts of global megatrends (GMTs) for the region. It also identifies and collates existing evidence related to long-term trends and outlooks in environmental issues in the Western Balkans, and recognises how these relate to global trends. The participation and input of regional experts, through two project workshops, resulted in the identification of key GMT implications for the region grouped in three thematic clusters: Biodiversity and ecosystems, Resource use and supply, and Climate. Numerous risks and opportunities for the region or national environment and environmental policy are also identified related to each of the selected implications. Most of the risks and opportunities noted by experts relate directly or indirectly to resource management, in particular the need to balance different uses of water resources in the region. Although policy is a key factor in mitigating these risks and maximising opportunities, the study concludes that a broader focus is required. Responding to the risks and opportunities associated with GMT implications may include policy changes, but can also involve other types of response e.g.: more joint working across the region and between policy areas; better enforcement of existing policy; identification of long-term knowledge needs. Finally, this report provides some broad considerations for policy and decision makers in the region arising from the study into GMT implications.

Report

Baker J, Papadopoulou L, Sheate W, 2018, United Kingdom, Biodiversity Offsets: European Perspectives on No Net Loss of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Pages: 211-239, ISBN: 9783319725796

Before the mid-2000s biodiversity offsetting was not part of the environmental policy discourse in the United Kingdom (UK). Since that time, of the UK’s four national administrations, England has been the most pro-active with regard to biodiversity offsetting. As a result this chapter focuses on the policy and practice of England with a short section summarising relevant developments in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Book chapter

Carvalho S, Partidario M, Sheate W, 2017, High speed rail comparative strategic assessments in EU member states, ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT REVIEW, Vol: 66, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 0195-9255

Journal article

Sheate WR, 2017, 'Streamlining' the SEA Process, Editors: Jones, Scotford, Publisher: HART PUBL, Pages: 185-212, ISBN: 978-1-84946-633-2

Book chapter

Turnpenny J, Russell D, Jordan A, Bond A, Sheate WRet al., 2016, “Environment”, Handbook of Regulatory Impact Assessment, Editors: Dunlop, Radaelli, Publisher: Edward Elgar, ISBN: 978 1 78254 955 0

Book chapter

Sheate WR, Eales RP, 2016, Effectiveness of European national SEA systems: How are they making a difference?, European and International Experiences of Strategic Environmental Assessment: Recent Progress and Future Prospects, Pages: 177-201, ISBN: 9780415656771

Book chapter

Baker J, Sheate WR, Bennett T, Payne D, Tucker G, White O, Forrest Set al., 2016, Evaluation of the Biodiversity Offsetting Pilot Programme, Evaluation of the Biodiversity Offsetting Pilot Programme Final ReportVolume 1, Defra, London, WC1051

The evaluation project of the biodiversity offsetting pilot programme was a two year study commissioned by Defra which began in July 2012, undertaken by Collingwood Environmental Planning (CEP) in partnership with the Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP). Evidence from the pilot programme suggests that whilst biodiversity offsetting has the potential to deliver improvements in biodiversity outcomes it will require additional resources and ecological expertise in local authorities to deliver it and in instances where residual biodiversity loss is identified will increase costs overall for developers compared to current practice. It is likely that it would, at best, deliver only marginal benefits in terms of streamlining the planning process for agreeing compensation for biodiversity loss.

Report

Geneletti D, Bond A, Russel D, Turnpenny J, Sheate W, Jordan Aet al., 2015, Ecosystem services and sustainability assessment: Theory and practice, Handbook of Sustainability Assessment, Pages: 215-234, ISBN: 9781783471362

10. Ecosystem services and sustainability assessment: theory and practice Davide Geneletti, Alan Bond, Duncan Russel, John Turnpenny, William Sheate and Andrew Jordan 10.1 INTRODUCTION Ecosystem services are the benefits human populations derive f….

Book chapter

Sussams LW, Sheate WR, Eales RP, 2015, Green infrastructure as a climate change adaptation policy intervention: Muddying the waters or clearing a path to a more secure future?, JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, Vol: 147, Pages: 184-193, ISSN: 0301-4797

Journal article

Sheate WR, Baker J, Papadopoulou L, Eales Ret al., 2015, Monitoring and Evaluation of Nature Improvement Areas: Final Report (2012-15) Annex 1: Counterfactual Report, Publisher: Defra

Report

Russell D, Turnpenny J, Bond A, Adelle C, Sheate WRet al., 2014, UK National Ecosystem Assessment Follow-on. Work Package Report 9: Embedding an Ecosystem Services Framework in appraisal: Key barriers and enablers., UK National Ecosystem Assessment Follow-on Phase, Publisher: UNEP-WCMC, LWEC, UK.

Book chapter

West C, Dawkins E, Brugere C, Rafaelli D, Sheate WRet al., 2013, Measuring the impacts on global biodiversity of goods and services imported into the UK., Measuring the impacts on global biodiversity of goods and services imported into the UK. Final Report to Defra., London, Publisher: Defra

West, C., Dawkins, E., Croft, S., Brugere, C., Sheate, W. & Raffaelli, D.

Report

Baker J, Sheate WR, Phillips P, Eales Ret al., 2013, Ecosystem services in environmental assessment - Help or hindrance?, ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT REVIEW, Vol: 40, Pages: 3-13, ISSN: 0195-9255

Journal article

Partidário MDR, Sheate WR, 2013, Chapitre 10. Durabilité et évaluation environnementale stratégique : fusions théoriques et interdisciplinarité, L’évaluation de la durabilité, Publisher: Éditions Quæ, Pages: 191-213

Book chapter

Fazey I, Evely AC, Reed MS, Stringer LC, Kruijsen J, White PCL, Newsham A, Jin L, Cortazzi M, Phillipson J, Blackstock C, Entwhistle N, Sheate W, Armstrong F, Blackmore C, Fazey J, Ingram J, Gregson J, Lowe P, Morton S, Trevitt Cet al., 2013, Knowledge Exchange: A Review and Research Agenda, Environmental Conservation, Vol: 40, Pages: 19-36

Journal article

Partidario MR, Sheate W, 2013, "Soutenabilité et évaluation environnementale stratégique : fusions théoriques et interdisciplinarité", "L'évaluation de la soutenabilité", Editors: Vivien, Lepart, Marty, Versailles, France, Publisher: Éditions QUAE, ISBN: 978-2-7592-1904-9

Book chapter

Partidario MR, Sheate WR, 2013, Knowledge brokerage - potential for increased capacities and shared power in impact assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment Review, Vol: 39, Pages: 26-36

Journal article

Sheate WR, Eales RP, Daly E, Baker J, Murdoch A, Hill C, Ojike U, Karpouzoglou Tet al., 2012, Spatial representation and specification of ecosystem services: A methodology using land use/land cover data and stakeholder engagement, Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management, Vol: 14, ISSN: 1464-3332

The challenge for implementing an ecosystems approach to environmental decision-making processes, such as spatial planning, is to understand the range, nature and amount of ecosystem services currently provided and the potential for such service provision in the future. The ability to spatially represent ecosystems services is a critical element of the evidence base on which to make decisions about how physical space is used most effectively and sustainably, and the way people and activities are distributed at different spatial scales. This paper reports on the outcomes of a research project originally undertaken for the UK Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs which developed a methodology for mapping ecosystem services using GIS and readily available, existing land use/land cover datasets. Critical components of the methodology, in order to determine which datasets are appropriate for which services, are network analysis and stakeholder engagement techniques, to define the relevant typology of ecosystem services and their relationship to land use/land cover types. The methodology was developed and tested successfully in the context of green grid (green infrastructure) networks in a major UK regeneration area, the Thames Gateway, to the east of London, and its potential use in impact assessment further explored through a number of case studies. © 2012 Imperial College Press.

Journal article

Sheate WR, 2012, SEA and environmental planning and management tools, Handbook of Strategic Environmental Assessment, Pages: 243-256, ISBN: 9781138975699

This chapter draws on a 2005 workshop session at the International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) Conference in Prague on strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and environmental planning and management tools, but also reflects a wider developing trend in understanding the linkages and overlaps between such tools. The workshop papers and discussions provide a stepping stone for a wider analysis, drawing on a developing, though limited, literature on linking SEA (and its variations) and strategic environmental planning and management tools.

Book chapter

Sheate WR, 2012, Purposes, Paradigms and Pressure Groups: Accountability and Sustainability in EUEnvironmental Assessment, 1985-2010., Environmental Impact Assessment Review, Vol: 33, Pages: 91-102

Twenty five years since the introduction of the European Union (EU) environmental impactassessment (EIA) Directive in 1985 this paper reflects on the extent to which environmentalassessment (EA) processes, over the course of their evolution over the last 25 years in the EU, have provided a platform for enhancing accountability and sustainability. Surprisingly - in the context of legal mandates for EA - there is little reference in the EA literature explicitly to the literature onaccountability and the role EA may play in this increasingly important aspect of governance. The paper explores EA implementation principally from an environmentalist perspective and particularly the way in which NGOs and other advocates for the environment in the UK and EU have used the EA legislation as a lever for increasing democratic, corporate and professional accountability of proponents anddecision-makers alike. From an historical analysis, including two historical EIA case studies and two contemporary SEA case studies, it becomes clear that EA has had an important role to play - at the legislative level in providing the requirements for accountability, and at the implementation level as the lever that can be used to hold individuals, organisations and authorities to account for their actions. The relationship with the shift to sustainability is a close one, since sustainable development demands greater public involvement in decision-making and greater accountability of executive decisions to thepublic. The lessons from this analysis allow the development of a nascent policy-oriented theoryregarding EA's role in accountability, which provides a framework for a distinctive new area of EA research and policy analysis. Moreover, an accountability perspective on EA could help re-frame EA for policy makers from being purely an informational and procedural instrument to one which promotes better accountability and sustainability simultaneously.

Journal article

Campbell G, Sheate W, 2012, Embedding an ecosystems approach?, Town and Country Planning, Vol: 81, Pages: 139-144

It has been four years since Defra published the Ecosystem Approach Action Plan (EAAP) in an attempt to place ecological thinking and an awareness of the value of nature at the heart of decision-making. This article reviews how well the approach has been embedded into urban planning in the rapidly re-developing London boroughs of Greenwich and Lewisham. Whilst success has been achieved in putting an ecosystem approach at the heart of Defra’s own policy, such an approach is largely absent from planning policy published since the EAAP, and from development planning at the local level in the two boroughs. Neither does it appear in the proposed National Planning Policy Framework. With local authorities showing interest in the use and value of an ecosystems approach, the Defra family could increase its policy impact by engaging local stakeholders directly in policy exchange. If the approach remains ignored outside of Defra, and particularly by CLG, the potential benefits of such an approach remain unexploited.

Journal article

Allen J, Sheate WR, Diaz-Chavez R, 2012, Community-based Renewable Energy in the Lake District National Park – Local Drivers, Enablers, Barriers and Solutions, Local Environment: The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, Vol: 17, Pages: 261-280

There are local energy solutions that offer the diversity and stability missing in the majority of centralised energy systems. Often, UK policies with top-down targets promote the quick fix rather than the most sustainable scheme and institutional and social barriers inhibit the local action needed to identify, plan and deliver the most valuable and appropriate alternatives. Community-based renewable energy (CRE) schemes promote area-based approaches aimed at simultaneously lowering energy consumption and increasing production.Interviews and case studies with public, private and community-based stakeholders in the Lake District National Park reveal the drivers, enablers and barriers to CRE schemes. Two solutions designed to catalyse and coordinate local action are proposed: CRE plans and champions. Together from the bottom-up, they help to generate, coordinate and communicate the necessary local knowledge, resources and trust to promote positive datasets on energy capacity, opportunity and need. Thus, planning becomes suitably strategic for achieving sustainable energy futures.

Journal article

Sheate W, White O, Daly E, Zamparruti T, Volkery Aet al., 2012, Embedding Futures Thinking in Environmental Policymaking, Publisher: European Foresight Platform (EFP), EFP Brief No. 241

Report

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