Imperial College London

Živa Cotič, MA

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Visiting Researcher
 
 
 
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Contact

 

z.cotic

 
 
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Location

 

304Reynolds BuildingCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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5 results found

Cotic Z, Car J, Wark P, Rees Ret al., 2016, Factors influencing the implementation, adoption, use, sustainability and scalability of eLearning for family medicine specialty training: a systematic review protocol, Systematic Reviews, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2046-4053

BackgroundIn 2013, there was a shortage of approximately 7.2 million health workers worldwide, which is larger among family physicians than among specialists. eLearning could provide a potential solution to some of these global workforce challenges. However, there is little evidence on factors facilitating or hindering implementation, adoption, use, scalability and sustainability of eLearning. This review aims to synthesise results from qualitative and mixed methods studies to provide insight on factors influencing implementation of eLearning for family medicine specialty education and training. Additionally, this review aims to identify the actions needed to increase effectiveness of eLearning and identify the strategies required to improve eLearning implementation, adoption, use, sustainability and scalability for family medicine speciality education and training.MethodsA systematic search will be conducted across a range of databases for qualitative studies focusing on experiences, barriers, facilitators, and other factors related to the implementation, adoption, use, sustainability and scalability of eLearning for family medicine specialty education and training. Studies will be synthesised by using the framework analysis approach.DiscussionThis study will contribute to the evaluation of eLearning implementation, adoption, use, sustainability and scalability for family medicine specialty training and education and the development of eLearning guidelines for postgraduate medical education.

Journal article

Mlinar S, Petek D, Cotic Z, Ceplak MM, Zaletel Met al., 2016, Persons with Epilepsy: Between Social Inclusion and Marginalisation, Behavioural Neurology, Vol: 2016, ISSN: 0953-4180

Background. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that can lead to complex psychosocial consequences. Epilepsy can change the social status of persons with epilepsy (PWE) and has an effect on their social inclusion as well as their perception of social inclusion. This study aims to explore subjective experiences with social inclusion of PWE in Slovenia. Methods. This study takes a qualitative approach. Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted with eleven participants. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Results. Epilepsy has physical, emotional, and social consequences. Physical consequences of epilepsy are mainly tiredness and exhaustion following an epileptic episode, frequently accompanied by headaches. Emotional consequences are different forms of fear. The main social consequence identified is a negative effect on PWE’s social network, which leads to (self-)isolation and social distrust. Conclusion. PWE experience of social inclusion depends on various psychosocial factors and differs from person to person. The consequences of epilepsy are shown in PWE social contacts and their sense of social inclusion and autonomy.

Journal article

Car J, Majeed A, Wheeler E, et alet al., 2015, Technical Report: eLearning for undergraduate health professional education - a systematic review informing a radical transformation of health workforce development, Publisher: World Health organisation

ABSTRACT Source: http://whoeducationguidelines.org/content/elearning-reportThis publication on ‘eLearning for Undergraduate Health Professional Education’ responds to a need at the country level for evidence to inform and guide health professional education as an important vehicle in preparing health professionals to be ‘fit-for-purpose’. The World Health Organization (WHO) Department of Health Workforce in collaboration with the Department of Knowledge, Ethics and Research commissioned the Global eHealth Unit (GeHU) at Imperial College London to conduct a systematic review of the scientific literature to evaluate the effectiveness of eLearning for undergraduate health professional education.At a global level, it will assist in the implementation of the WHO’s global human resources for health strategy by providing the best evidence of how and where eLearning can best be used in country settings. The report also provides a foundation for the development of future WHO guidelines for pre-service training and the direction for future research.

Report

George PP, Papachristou N, Belisario JM, Wang W, Wark PA, Cotic Z, Rasmussen K, Sluiter R, Riboli-Sasco E, Car LT, Musulanov EM, Molina JA, Heng BH, Zhang Y, Wheeler EL, Al Shorbaji N, Majeed A, Car Jet al., 2014, Online eLearning for undergraduates in health professions: A systematic review of the impact on knowledge, skills, attitudes and satisfaction, JOURNAL OF GLOBAL HEALTH, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2047-2978

Journal article

Rasmussen K, Belisario JM, Wark PA, Molina JA, Loong SL, Cotic Z, Papachristou N, Riboli-Sasco E, Car LT, Musulanov EM, Kunz H, Zhang Y, George PP, Heng BH, Wheeler EL, Al Shorbaji N, Svab I, Atun R, Majeed A, Car Jet al., 2014, Offline eLearning for undergraduates in health professions: A systematic review of the impact on knowledge, skills, attitudes and satisfaction, JOURNAL OF GLOBAL HEALTH, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2047-2978

Journal article

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