Imperial College London

Zen Makuch

Faculty of Natural SciencesCentre for Environmental Policy

Reader in Law
 
 
 
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Contact

 

z.makuch

 
 
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Location

 

Weeks BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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73 results found

Makuch Z, Georgieva S, Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2020, Innovative regulatory and financial parameters for advancing carbon capture and storage technologies, Fordham Environmental Law Review, Vol: 32, Pages: 1-16, ISSN: 1079-6657

In the post-industrial age, the realisation of inherent technical innovation potentials requires that stakeholders develop flexible, cooperation-based frameworks if first mover opportunities and advantages are to be realised. In the Paris Agreement5 implementation context, carbon capture and storage technologies have emerged as a complementary adjunct to climate change mitigation and a diversified energy mix. However, developing the technology is not without technical and financial risks. The challenge for key stakeholders, primarily (but not exclusively) government and industry counterparts is to develop mutually reinforcing strategies, regulations and policies for testing and commercialising Carbon Capture and Storage (“CCS”)technologies and networks, as that will be determinative of their fate. In the Paris Agreement implementation period, the UK, for example, has indicated a commitment to bold greenhouse gas reductions(57% by 2030),and investment in CCS, as part of the ambitious emissions reductions targets set forth by the European Union, the deployment of which is meant to count for 20% of the greenhouse gas emissions captured by 2030. This has subsequently resulted in plans for several pilot CCS plants on UK soil. The up-scaling of CCS to the demonstration level, however, is dependent not only on the presence of sufficient interest and funding –an ongoing issue in the UK both pre-and post-Brexit-but also on the existence of appropriate regulatory conditions and options for additional private financing by industrial stakeholders. Furthermore, it is important to note that the up-scaling of projects from pilot to demonstration, and further on to a commercial-scale, is materializing in the context of a global financial crisis and a dip in investment trust in high-risk ventures. The

Journal article

Makuch Z, Georgieva S, Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2019, On the need for synergistic regulatory and financial parameters for carbon capture and storage technology, Transnational Environmental Law, ISSN: 2047-1025

In the post-industrial age, the realisation of inherent technical innovation potentials requires that stakeholders develop flexible, cooperation-based frameworks if first mover opportunities and advantages are to be realised. In this context, carbon capture and storage technologies have emerged as a complementary adjunct, to a diversified energy mix. However, developing the technology is not without technical and financial risks. The capacity of key stakeholders, primarily (but not exclusively) government and industry counterparts is to develop mutually reinforcing strategies and policies for testing and commercialising Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies, as that will be determinative of their fate.The UK in particular has indicated a commitment to bold greenhouse gas reductions, and investment in CCS, as part of the ambitious emissions reductions targets set forth by the European Union, the deployment of which is meant to count for 20% of the greenhouse gas emissions captured by 2030. This has subsequently resulted in plans for several pilot CCS plants on UK soil. The up-scaling of CCS to the demonstration level, however, is dependent not only on the presence of sufficient interest and funding – an ongoing issue in the UK - but also on the existence of appropriate regulatory conditions and options for additional private financing by industrial stakeholders. Furthermore, it is important to note that the up-scaling of projects from pilot to demonstration, and further on to a commercial-scale, is materializing in the context of a global financial crisis and a dip in investment trust in high-risk ventures. The development of CCS projects, in individual states, is not only influenced by national regulatory regimes, policy developments, and fluctuations in the financial markets, but is also dependant on the legislative signals given from supra-national bodies and binding international agreements. In Europe, the CCS Directive’s approach to long term

Journal article

Makuch Z, 2019, Legislative Interpretation and Guidance on the New Waste Management Regime of the European Union, Fordham Environmental Law Review, ISSN: 1079-6657

Journal article

Makuch Z, 2019, Regulating Insurance for Climate Change Resilient Food Systems, Publisher: Edward Elgar

Provision of climate resilient agricultural parametric insurance is highly variable. Regulatory support is an enabler of widened supply of parametric insurance, which can be designed in a pro-poor and climate adaptive manner. The aims of this book are to: (i) assess organic evolution of climate change resilient agricultural parametric insurance provision; (ii) evaluate regulation of climate change agricultural parametric insurance in Africa and related contexts; (iii) provide an idealised regulatory framework and detailed regulatory guidance to facilitate insurance as a climate risk tool. This research draws on the launch of the WINnERS programme in Tanzania, literature analysis and interviews with critical market participants. A regulatory framework and accompanying guidance is presented which is practical and implementable, addressing the issues of regulatory comprehensiveness and coherence. It is intended to facilitate the identification of gaps and barriers as insurance regulators seek to secure the protective and promotive elements of parametric insurance for climate change resilient agriculture.

Book

Voigt C, Makuch Z, 2018, Courts and the Environment, Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing, ISBN: 9781788114677

This discerning book examines the challenges, opportunities and solutions for courts adjudicating on environmental cases.

Book

Hecker S, Haklay M, Bowser A, Makuch Z, Vogel J, Bonn Aet al., 2018, Citizen Science - Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy, London, Publisher: UCL Press, ISBN: 9781787352339

Citizen science, the active participation of the public in scientific research projects, is a rapidly expanding field in open science and open innovation. It provides an integrated model of public knowledge production and engagement with science. As a growing worldwide phenomenon, it is invigorated by evolving new technologies that connect people easily and effectively with the scientific community. Catalysed by citizens’ wishes to be actively involved in scientific processes, as a result of recent societal trends, it also offers contributions to the rise in tertiary education. In addition, citizen science provides a valuable tool for citizens to play a more active role in sustainable development.Citizen Science: Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy identifies and explains the role of citizen science within innovation in science and society, and as a vibrant and productive science-policy interface. The scope of this volume is global, geared towards identifying solutions and lessons to be applied across science, practice and policy. The chapters consider the role of citizen science in the context of the wider agenda of open science and open innovation, and discusses progress towards responsible research and innovation, two of the most critical aspects of science today.

Book

Makuch K, Aczel M, 2018, Children and citizen science, Citizen Science: Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy, Editors: Hecker, Hacklay, Bowser, Makuch, Vogel, Bonn, Hecker, Haklay, Bowser, Makuch, Vogel, Bonn, London, United Kingdom, Publisher: UCL Press, Pages: 391-409, ISBN: 978-1-78735-233-9

To date, a cursory examination of the literature tells us that a large number of citizen science projects have been, or are, in the environmental domain. It is thus on environmental citizen science that we focus this work. This chapter suggests why children ought to be involved in citizen science – largely through environmental projects, highlights some case study examples to show positive and negative outcomes of child participation in said projects, comments on the potential contributions to science education and environmental awareness, and highlights some practical considerations of child involvement in citizen science. This work is thus premised on the two-way benefits of engaging children in environmental citizen science:1. Children can both learn from and contribute to environmental knowledge, education and scientific enquiry; and2. Where activities take place outdoors, child involvement in citizen science provides access to the environment, enabling children to develop environmental awareness, responsibility, emotional and physical benefits.As the European Citizen Science Association (ECSA) assert in theirformative ‘Ten Principles of Citizen Science’, ‘Citizen science is a flexible concept which can be adapted and applied within diverse situations and disciplines’. It is exactly this adaptability and promotion of diversity which we embrace in this chapter, as we argue that such approaches can open up opportunities, outlined below, for child participation, in the environ- mental field. Furthermore, the involvement of individuals, (thus including children), in citizen science is advocated in ECSA Principle 3, which states that ‘learning opportunities, personal enjoyment, social benefits, satisfaction through contributing to scientific evidence e.g., to address local, national and international issues [. . .] and influence policy’, inter alia, may be some of the gains of participation in citizen science projects, and th

Book chapter

Hecker S, Bonney R, Haklay M, Holker F, Hofer H, Goebel C, Gold M, Makuch Z, Ponti M, Richter A, Robinson L, Iglesias JR, Owen R, Peltola T, Sforzi A, Shirk J, Vogel J, Vohland K, Witt T, Bonn Aet al., 2018, Innovation in citizen science – perspectives on science-policy advances, Citizen Science: Theory and Practice, Vol: 3, ISSN: 2057-4991

Citizen science is growing as a field of research with contributions from diverse disciplines, promoting innovation in science, society, and policy. Inter- and transdisciplinary discussions and critical analyses are needed to use the current momentum to evaluate, demonstrate, and build on the advances that have been made in the past few years. This paper synthesizes results of discussions at the first international citizen science conference of the European Citizen Science Association (ECSA) in 2016 in Berlin, Germany, and distills major points of the discourse into key recommendations. To enhance innovation in science, citizen science needs to clearly demonstrate its scientific benefit, branch out across disciplines, and foster active networking and new formats of collaboration, including true co-design with participants. For fostering policy advances, it is important to embrace opportunities for policy-relevant monitoring and policy development and to work with science funders to find adequate avenues and evaluation tools to support citizen science. From a society angle it is crucial to engage with societal actors in various formats that suit participants and to evaluate two-way learning outcomes as well as to develop the transformative role of science communication. We hope that these key perspectives will promote citizen science progress at the science-society-policy interface.

Journal article

Ristic B, Madani K, Makuch Z, 2015, The Water Footprint of Data Centers, SUSTAINABILITY, Vol: 7, Pages: 11260-11284

Journal article

Boot-Handford ME, Abanades JC, Anthony EJ, Blunt MJ, Brandani S, Mac Dowell N, Fernandez JR, Ferrari M-C, Gross R, Hallett JP, Haszeldine RS, Heptonstall P, Lyngfelt A, Makuch Z, Mangano E, Porter RTJ, Pourkashanian M, Rochelle GT, Shah N, Yao JG, Fennell PSet al., 2014, Carbon capture and storage update, Energy and Environmental Science, Vol: 7, Pages: 130-189, ISSN: 1754-5692

In recent years, Carbon Capture and Storage (Sequestration) (CCS) has been proposed as a potential method to allow the continued use of fossil-fuelled power stations whilst preventing emissions of CO2 from reaching the atmosphere. Gas, coal (and biomass)-fired power stations can respond to changes in demand more readily than many other sources of electricity production, hence the importance of retaining them as an option in the energy mix. Here, we review the leading CO2 capture technologies, available in the short and long term, and their technological maturity, before discussing CO2 transport and storage. Current pilot plants and demonstrations are highlighted, as is the importance of optimising the CCS system as a whole. Other topics briefly discussed include the viability of both the capture of CO2 from the air and CO2 reutilisation as climate change mitigation strategies. Finally, we discuss the economic and legal aspects of CCS.

Journal article

Makuch Z, Oraee-Mirzamani N, 2011, “Corporate Environmental Disclosure Law, Fiduciary Duties and the Aarhus Convention”, European Energy and Environmental Law Review

Journal article

MAKUCH Z, Glatzel K, Wright H, 2011, Technology Innovation and the Law – Climate Change Adaptation Technologies, Environmental and Energy Law, Editors: Makuch, Pereira, Publisher: Wiley Blackwell Publishing

Book chapter

MAKUCH Z, Oraee-Mirzamani N, 2011, Corporate Law and the Aarhus Convention, Environmental and Energy Law, Editors: Makuch, Pereira, Publisher: Wiley Blackwell Publishing

Book chapter

MAKUCH Z, Karyampa M, 2011, The Law and Practice of Air Quality Management, Environmental and Energy Law, Editors: Makuch, Pereira, Publisher: Wiley Blackwell Publishing

Book chapter

MAKUCH Z, Aidelojie K, 2011, The Clean Development Mechanism – Legal and Contractual Framework in CDM Renewable Energy Projects, Environmental and Energy Law, Editors: Makuch, Pereira, Publisher: Wiley Blackwell Publishing

Book chapter

Makuch Z, Georgieva S, Oraee-Mirzamani B, 2011, Carbon Capture and Storage Liability, Environmental and Energy Law, Editors: Makuch, Pereira, Wiley Blackwell Publishing, Makuch, Pereira, Publisher: Wiley Blackwell Publishing

Book chapter

Makuch Z, Georgieva S, 2011, Carbon Capture and Storage in the United Kingdom (254 pages), Publisher: (Imperial College Press)

Report

Makuch Z, Parker C, 2011, Comparative Approaches to Forestry Regulation in Developing and Developed Countries (Commissioned)., Publisher: (Imperial College Press)

Book

Makuch Z, 2010, Zero Carbon Strategy for the Maldives Transport, Tourism, Agriculture and Building Sectors 473 pages, Publisher: (Imperial College Press)

Report

Makuch Z, Lewis C, 2010, Litigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Paying the Bill for Climate Change 100 pages, Publisher: (Imperial College Press)

Report

Makuch Z, 2009, “SMART, CDM Projects and Sustainability Indictors” 411 pages, Publisher: (Imperial College Report)

Report

Makuch Z, 2009, Public Guidance on the Aarhus Convention on Access to Environmental Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters 54 pages, Publisher: (MEPA)

Report

Makuch Z, Macdonald K, Jones C, 2008, "Implementing the EU Communications and the EU Recommendation on Integrated Coastal Zone Management: A Study Developing a Model Series of Indicators to Evaluate the Effectiveness of the Integrated Coastal Zone Management Process in the East Riding of Yorkshire Coastal Zone", European Energy and Environmental Law Review

Journal article

Makuch Z, MacDonald K, 2008, “Domestic Initiatives in the UK” Climate Change and European Emissions Trading: Lessons for Theory and Practice

Journal article

Makuch Z, Foxon T, Pearson P, Mata Met al., 2008, “Regulatory and Related Policy Drivers and Barriers to Sustainable Innovation: Energy Sources in Vehicles” in Critical Issues in Environmental Taxation, Publisher: (Oxford University Press)

Book chapter

Makuch Z, Aidelojie K, 2008, “Multilateral Organisations, Fossil Fuels and Energy Law and Policy: The Tower of Babel Revisited “, European Energy and Environmental Law Review

Journal article

Makuch Z, MacDonald K, Benzon NV, 2008, “The Right for Disabled Children to Access the Natural Environment: A Law and Policy Critique”, Willamette Journal of International Law and Dispute Resolution

Journal article

Makuch Z, 2006, Lessons in International Environmental Taxation Regulation and the Cross Border Movement of Goods: Transport Sector Issues, International Conference

Conference paper

Makuch Z, 2006, European Integration and a National Energy Law, International Conference

Conference paper

Makuch Z, Dawson W, 2006, A Sustainable Herefordshire Investment Fund, A Sustainable Herefordshire Investment Fund, Publisher: Bullmers Foundation

Report

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