Imperial College London

DrLindaOude Griep

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Honorary Senior Research Officer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3300l.oude-griep

 
 
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Location

 

151Medical SchoolSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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39 results found

Aljuraiban GS, Gibson R, Oude Griep LM, Okuda N, Steffen LM, Van Horn L, Chan Qet al., 2019, Perspective: The application of a priori diet quality scores to cardiovascular disease risk: A critical evaluation of current scoring systems, Advances in Nutrition, ISSN: 2156-5376

Healthy dietary habits are the cornerstone of cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. Numerous researchers have developed diet quality indices to help evaluate and compare diet quality across and within various populations. The availability of these new indices raises questions regarding the best selection relevant to a given population. In this perspective, we critically evaluate a priori–defined dietary indices commonly applied in epidemiological studies of CVD risk and mortality. A systematic literature search identified 59 observational studies that applied a priori–defined diet quality indices to CVD risk factors and/or CVD incidence and/or CVD mortality. Among 31 different indices, these scores were categorized as follows: 1) those based on country-specific dietary patterns, 2) those adapted from distinct dietary guidelines, and 3) novel scores specific to key diet-related factors associated with CVD risk.The strengths and limitations of these indices are described according to index components, calculation methods, and the application of these indices to different population groups. Also, the importance of identifying methodological challenges faced by researchers when applying an index are considered, such as selection and weighting of food groups within a score, since food groups are not necessarily equivalent in their associations with CVD. The lack of absolute cutoff values, emphasis on increasing healthy food without limiting unhealthy food intake, and absence of validation of scores with biomarkers or other objective diet assessment methods further complicate decisions regarding the best indices to use. Future research should address these limitations, consider cross-cultural and other differences between population groups, and identify translational challenges inherent in attempting to apply a relevant diet quality index for use in CVD prevention at a population level.

Journal article

Aljuraiban GS, Stamler J, Chan Q, Van Horn L, Daviglus ML, Elliott P, Oude Griep LM, INTERMAP Research Groupet al., 2018, Relations between dairy product intake and blood pressure: the INTERnational study on MAcro/micronutrients and blood Pressure, Journal of Hypertension, Vol: 36, Pages: 2049-2058, ISSN: 0263-6352

BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic evidence suggests that low-fat dairy consumption may lower risk of hypertension. Dairy products may be distinctly linked to health, because of differences in nutritional composition, but little is known about specific nutrients that contribute to the dairy-blood pressure (BP) association, nor to underlying kidney function. METHODS: We examined cross-sectional associations to BP of dairy product intakes, total and by type, from the INTERnational study on MAcro/micronutrients and blood Pressure (INTERMAP) including 2694 participants aged 40-59 years from the UK and the USA. Eight BP, four 24-h dietary recalls and two 24-h urine samples were collected during four visits. Linear regression models adjusted for lifestyle/dietary factors to estimate BP differences per 2SD higher intakes of total-and-individual-types of dairy were calculated. RESULTS: Multivariable linear regression coefficients were estimated and pooled. In contrast to total and whole-fat dairy, each 195 g/1000 kcal (2SD) greater low-fat dairy intake was associated with a lower SBP -2.31 mmHg and DBP -2.27 mmHg. Significant associations attenuated with adjustment for dietary phosphorus, calcium, and lactose, but strengthened with urinary calcium adjustment. Stratification by median albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR; high ACR indicates impaired kidney function) showed strong associations between low-fat dairy and BP in participants with low ACR (SBP: -3.66; DBP: -2.15 mmHg), with no association in participants with high ACR. CONCLUSION: Low-fat dairy consumption was associated with lower BP, especially among participants with low ACR. Dairy-rich nutrients including phosphorus and calcium may have contributed to the beneficial associations with BP.

Journal article

Aljuraiban G, Stamler J, Chan Q, van Horn L, Daviglus M, Elliott P, Oude Griep Let al., Relations between dairy product intake and blood pressure: the INTERMAP study, Journal of Hypertension, ISSN: 0263-6352

Background: epidemiologic evidence suggests that low-fat dairy consumption may lower risk of hypertension. Dairy products may be distinctly linked to health, due to differences in nutritional composition, but little is known about specific nutrients that contribute to the dairy-blood pressure (BP) association, nor to underlying kidney function. Methods: we examined cross-sectional associations to BP of dairy product intakes, total and by type, from the INTERnational study on MAcro/micronutrients and blood Pressure (INTERMAP) including 2,694 participants aged 40-59 years from the United Kingdom and the United States. Eight BP, four 24-hour dietary recalls and two 24-hour urine samples were collected during four visits. Linear regression models adjusted for lifestyle/dietary factors to estimate BP differences per 2SD higher intakes of total-and-individual-types of dairy were calculated.Results: multivariable linear regression coefficients were estimated and pooled. In contrast to total and whole-fat dairy, each 195 g/1000 kcal (2SD) greater low-fat dairy intake was associated with a lower systolic BP (SBP) -2.31 mmHg and diastolic BP (DBP) -2.27 mmHg. Significant associations attenuated with adjustment for dietary phosphorus, calcium, and lactose, but strengthened with urinary calcium adjustment. Stratification by median albumin-creatinine-ratio (ACR), (high ACR indicates impaired kidney function) showed strong associations between low-fat dairy and BP in participants with low ACR (SBP: -3.66; DBP: -2.15 mmHg), with no association in participants with high ACR. Conclusions: low-fat dairy consumption was associated with lower BP, especially among participants with low ACR. Dairy-rich nutrients including phosphorus and calcium may have contributed to the beneficial associations with BP.

Journal article

Lentjes MAH, Griep LMO, Keogh RH, Mulligan AA, Khaw KTet al., 2017, Cross-sectional associations of meal size and meal timing with lipid biomarkers in a population-based cohort, Summer Meeting, 10–12 July 2017, Improving Nutrition in Metropolitan Areas, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Pages: E129-E129, ISSN: 0029-6651

Conference paper

Oude Griep LM, Elliott P, 2017, Cardiovascular Diseases: Sodium and Blood Pressure, Public Health Nutrition, Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 9781118660973

Public Health Nutrition Edited by Judith L Buttriss, Ailsa A Welch, John M Kearney and Susan A Lanham-New In this second edition of the bestselling title from the acclaimed Nutrition Society Textbook series, Public Health Nutrition has been ...

Book chapter

Pertiwi K, Oude Griep LM, Stamler J, Chan Q, Geleijnse JM, Steffen LM, Rodriguez B, Daviglus ML, Van Horn L, Elliott Pet al., 2017, Relationship of potato consumption, total and by preparation method with blood pressure and body mass index: The International Population Study on Macronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP) US study, Scientific Sessions on Epidemiology and Prevention, Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health of the American Hearth Association, Publisher: American Heart Association, Pages: AP272-AP272, ISSN: 0009-7322

Background: Limited evidence from prospective US cohort studies suggests that higher potato intake is associated with a higher risk of hypertension and obesity. Different preparation methods affect the nutritional composition of potatoes and are related to different dietary choices that may influence associations with blood pressure and body mass index (BMI).Objective: To investigate potato consumption, total and by preparation method, in relation to blood pressure and BMI.Methods: We used cross-sectional data of 2,195 participants aged 40 to 59 in 1996-1997 from the United States samples of the population-based INTERMAP study. During four visits, four in-depth multipass 24-hour dietary recalls and eight blood pressure measurements were collected. Reported potato intakes were categorized as fried and non-fried potatoes, using the USDA food grouping system. Potato intakes (g/1000 kcal) were averaged over four days. Regression coefficients per 2SD higher intake were estimated using multivariate linear regression analyses with adjustments for age, sex, sample, lifestyle and disease factors, and other food groups. To assess influence on the association, diet quality (by Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension adherence score), BMI, urinary sodium and potassium were added separately to the previous model.Results: Median intake of total, non-fried, and fried potatoes were 40 g/d, 23 g/d and 8 g/d, respectively. Total and non-fried potato intakes were not associated with blood pressure. The association between fried potatoes and blood pressure varied by sex (P for interaction=0.03).In women, higher fried potato intake (2SD: 20 g/1000 kcal) was associated with a +3.00 mmHg (95%CI: 1.29, 4.71) higher systolic and +1.26 mmHg (95%CI: 0.15, 2.38) higher diastolic blood pressure, which prevailed after additional, but separate, adjustments for BMI, diet quality, urinary sodium and potassium. Potato chips contributed predominantly (79%) to fried potato intake and accounted for the

Conference paper

Hoogeveen EK, Geleijnse JM, Giltay EJ, Soedamah-Muthu SS, de Goede J, Oude Griep LM, Stijnen T, Kromhout Det al., 2017, Kidney function and specific mortality in 60-80 years old post-myocardial infarction patients: A 10-year follow-up study., PLOS One, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1932-6203

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent among older post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients. It is not known whether CKD is an independent risk factor for mortality in older post-MI patients with optimal cardiovascular drug-treatment. Therefore, we studied the relation between kidney function and all-cause and specific mortality among older post-MI patients, without severe heart failure, who are treated with state-of-the-art pharmacotherapy. From 2002-2006, 4,561 Dutch post-MI patients were enrolled and followed until death or January 2012. We estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) with cystatin C (cysC) and creatinine (cr) using the CKD-EPI equations and analyzed the relation with any and major causes of death using Cox models and restricted cubic splines. Mean (SD) for age was 69 years (5.6), 79% were men, 17% smoked, 21% had diabetes, 90% used antihypertensive drugs, 98% used antithrombotic drugs and 85% used statins. Patients were divided into four categories of baseline eGFRcysC: ≥90 (33%; reference), 60-89 (47%), 30-59 (18%), and <30 (2%) ml/min/1.73m2. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. During follow-up, 873 (19%) patients died: 370 (42%) from cardiovascular causes, 309 (35%) from cancer, and 194 (22%) from other causes. After adjustment for age, sex and classic cardiovascular risk factor, hazard ratios (95%-confidence intervals) for any death according to the four eGFRcysC categories were: 1 (reference), 1.4 (1.1-1.7), 2.9 (2.3-3.6) and 4.4 (3.0-6.4). The hazard ratios of all-cause and cause-specific mortality increased linearly below kidney functions of 80 ml/min/1.73 m2. Weaker results were obtained for eGFRcr. To conclude, we found in optimal cardiovascular drug-treated post-MI patients an inverse graded relation between kidney function and mortality for both cardiovascular as well as non-cardiovascular causes. Risk of mortality increased linearly below kidney function of about 80 ml/min/1.73 m2.

Journal article

Lentjes MAH, Griep LMO, Keogh RH, Mulligan AA, Khaw KTet al., 2017, Cross-sectional associations between eating occasions, meals, and snacks with blood lipids in a population-based cohort, Publisher: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, Pages: E171-E171, ISSN: 0029-6651

Conference paper

Oude Griep LM, Chekmeneva E, Stamler J, Van Horn L, Chan Q, Ebbels TMD, Holmes E, Frost GS, Elliott Pet al., 2016, Urinary hippurate and proline betaine relative to fruit intake, blood pressure, and body mass index, Summer meeting 2016: New technology in nutrition research and practice, Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP), Pages: E178-E178, ISSN: 0029-6651

Conference paper

Oude Griep LM, Seferidi P, Stamler J, Van Horn L, Chan Q, Tzoulaki I, Steffen LM, Miura K, Ueshima H, Okuda N, Zhao L, Soedamah-Muthu SS, Daviglus ML, Elliott P, INTERMAP Research Groupet al., 2016, Relation of unprocessed, processed red meat and poultry consumption to blood pressure in East Asian and Western adults, Journal of Hypertension, Vol: 34, Pages: 1721-1729, ISSN: 1473-5598

Background: Epidemiologic evidence suggests that relationships of red meat consumption with risk of cardiovascular diseases depends on whether or not the meat is processed, including addition of preservatives, but evidence is limited for blood pressure (BP). Objective: To examine cross-sectional associations with BP of unprocessed and processed red meat and poultry consumption, total and by type, using data from the INTERnational study on MAcro/micronutrients and blood Pressure (INTERMAP).Design: INTERMAP included 4,680 men and women ages 40-59 years from 17 population samples in Japan, China, the United Kingdom, and the United States. During four visits, eight BP measurements, four multi-pass 24-hr dietary recalls, and two timed 24-hr urine samples were collected.Results: Average daily total unprocessed/processed meat consumption (g/1000 kcal) was 20/5 in East Asian and 38/21 in Western participants. Unprocessed meat intakes comprised red meat for 75% in East Asian and 50% in Western participants. In Westerners, multiple linear regression analyses showed systolic/diastolic BP differences for total unprocessed red meat consumption higher by 25 g/1000 kcal +0.74/+0.57 mmHg (P=0.03/0.01) and for unprocessed poultry of +0.79/+0.16 mmHg (P=0.02/0.50). Unprocessed red meat was not related to BP in East Asian participants. In Westerners, systolic/diastolic BP differences for processed red meat higher by 12.5 g/1000 kcal were +1.20/+0.24 mmHg (P<0.01/0.24), due to consumption of cold cuts and sausages (+1.59/+0.32 mmHg, P<0.001/0.27).Conclusion: These findings are consistent with recommendations to limit meat intake (processed and unprocessed) to maintain and improve cardiovascular health.

Journal article

Chan Q, Stamler J, Griep LM, Daviglus ML, Horn LV, Elliott Pet al., 2015, An Update on Nutrients and Blood Pressure., Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis, Vol: 23, Pages: 276-289, ISSN: 1880-3873

Adverse blood pressure (BP) is a major independent risk factor for epidemic cardiovascular diseases affecting almost one-quarter of the adult population worldwide. Dietary intake is a major determinant in the development and progression of high BP. Lifestyle modifications, including recommended dietary guidelines, are advocated by the American Society of Hypertension, the International Society of Hypertension, the Japanese Society of Hypertension, and many other organisations for treating all hypertensive people, prior to initiating drug therapy and as an adjunct to medication in persons already on drug therapy. Lifestyle modification can also reduce high BP and prevent development of hypertension. This review synthesizes results from the International Study of Macro/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP), a cross-sectional epidemiological study of 4,680 men and women aged 40-59 years from Japan, the People's Republic of China, the United Kingdom, and the United States, published over the past few years on cross cultural BP differences. INTERMAP has previously reported that intakes of vegetable protein, glutamic acid, total and insoluble fibre, total polyunsaturated fatty acid and linoleic acid, total n-3 fatty acid and linolenic acid, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, and non-heme iron were inversely related to BP. Direct associations of sugars (fructose, glucose, and sucrose) and sugar-sweetened beverages (especially combined with high sodium intake), cholesterol, glycine, alanine, and oleic acid from animal sources with BP were also reported by the INTERMAP Study.

Journal article

Sijtsma FPC, Soedamah-Muthu SS, de Goede J, Griep LMO, Geleijnse JM, Giltay EJ, de Boer MJ, Jacobs DR, Kromhout Det al., 2015, Healthy eating and lower mortality risk in a large cohort of cardiac patients who received state-of-the-art drug treatment, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 102, Pages: 1527-1533, ISSN: 0002-9165

Journal article

Aljuraiban GS, Oude Griep LM, Chan Q, Daviglus ML, Stamler J, Van Horn L, Elliott P, Frost GSet al., 2015, Total, insoluble and soluble dietary fibre intake in relation to blood pressure: the INTERMAP Study., British Journal of Nutrition, Vol: 114, Pages: 1480-1486, ISSN: 1475-2662

Prospective cohort studies have shown inverse associations between fibre intake and CVD, possibly mediated by blood pressure (BP). However, little is known about the impact of types of fibre on BP. We examined cross-sectional associations with BP of total, insoluble and soluble fibre intakes. Data were used from the INTERnational study on MAcro/micronutrients and blood Pressure (INTERMAP) study, including 2195 men and women aged between 40 and 59 years from the USA. During four visits, eight BP, four 24 h dietary recalls and two 24 h urine samples were collected. Linear regression models adjusted for lifestyle and dietary confounders to estimate BP differences per 2 sd higher intakes of total and individual types of fibre were calculated. After multivariable adjustment, total fibre intake higher by 6·8 g/4184 kJ (6·8 g/1000 kcal) was associated with a 1·69 mmHg lower systolic blood pressure (SBP; 95 % CI -2·97, -0·41) and attenuated to -1·01 mmHg (95 % CI -2·35, 0·34) after adjustment for urinary K. Insoluble fibre intake higher by 4·6 g/4184 kJ (4·6 g/1000 kcal) was associated with a 1·81 mmHg lower SBP (95 % CI -3·65, 0·04), additionally adjusted for soluble fibre and urinary K excretion, whereas soluble fibre was not associated with BP. Raw fruit was the main source of total and insoluble fibre, followed by whole grains and vegetables. In conclusion, higher intakes of fibre, especially insoluble, may contribute to lower BP, independent of nutrients associated with higher intakes of fibre-rich foods.

Journal article

Oude Griep LM, 2015, Unprocessed and Processed Meat Consumption and Blood Pressure: The INTERMAP Study, 2015 Scientific Session, Epidemiology and Prevention and Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health, American Heart Association, Publisher: American Heart Association, ISSN: 0009-7322

Conference paper

Aljuraiban GS, Chan Q, Oude Griep L, Brown IJ, Daviglus ML, Stamler J, Van Horn L, Elliott P, Frost GSet al., 2015, The Impact of Eating Frequency and Time of Intake on Nutrient Quality and Body Mass Index: The INTERMAP Study, a Population-Based Study, Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol: 115, Pages: 528-U284, ISSN: 2212-2672

BackgroundEpidemiologic evidence is sparse on the effect of dietary behaviors and diet quality on body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m2), which can be important drivers of the obesity epidemic.ObjectiveThis study investigated the relationships of frequency of eating and time of intake to energy density, nutrient quality, and BMI using data from the International Study on Macro/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure including 2,696 men and women aged 40 to 59 years from the United States and the United Kingdom.DesignThe International Study on Macro/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure is a cross-sectional investigation with four 24-hour dietary recalls and BMI measurements conducted between 1996 and 1999. Consumption of solid foods was aggregated into eating occasion. Nutrient density is expressed using the Nutrient Rich Food Index 9.3. The ratio of evening/morning energy intake was calculated; mean values of four visits were used.Statistical analyses performedCharacteristics across eating occasion categories are presented as adjusted mean with corresponding 95% CI. Multiple linear regression models were used to examine associations of eating occasions, ratio of evening/morning energy intake, dietary energy density, and Nutrient Rich Food Index 9.3 with BMI.ResultsCompared to participants with fewer than four eating occasions in 24 hours, those with six or more eating occasions in 24 hours had lower mean BMI (27.3 vs 29.0), total energy intake (2,129 vs 2,472 kcal/24 hours), dietary energy density (1.5 vs 2.1 kcal/g), and higher Nutrient Rich Food Index 9.3 (34.3 vs 28.1). In multiple regression analyses, higher evening intake relative to morning intake was directly associated with BMI; however, this did not influence the relationship between eating frequency and BMI.ConclusionsOur results suggest that a larger number of small meals may be associated with improved diet quality and lower BMI. This may have implications for behavioral approaches to controlling the obesity

Journal article

Chan Q, Stamler J, Brown IJ, Daviglus ML, Van Horn L, Dyer AR, Griep LMO, Miura K, Ueshima H, Zhao L, Nicholson JK, Holmes E, Elliott Pet al., 2014, Relation of raw and cooked vegetable consumption to blood pressure: the INTERMAP Study, JOURNAL OF HUMAN HYPERTENSION, Vol: 28, Pages: 353-359, ISSN: 0950-9240

Journal article

Oude Griep LM, 2014, Urinary Hippurate and Proline Betaine Excretion relative to Fleshy Fruit Intake and Blood Pressure: The INTERMAP Study, American Heart Association Scientic Sessions 2014: Cardiovascular Disease, Epidemiology and Prevention Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism

Linda M Oude Griep1; Joram M Posma1; Jeremiah Stamler2; Queenie Chan1; Linda Van Horn2; Lyn M Steffen3; Katsuyuki Miura4; Hirotsugu Ueshima4; Nagako Okuda5; Liancheng Zhao6; Martha L Daviglus2; Timothy M Ebbels1; Jeremy K Nicholson1; Elaine Holmes1; Paul Elliott1

Conference paper

Griep LMO, Stamler J, Chan Q, Van Horn L, Steffen LM, Miura K, Ueshima H, Okuda N, Zhao L, Daviglus ML, Elliott Pet al., 2013, Association of raw fruit and fruit juice consumption with blood pressure: the INTERMAP Study, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 97, Pages: 1083-1091, ISSN: 0002-9165

Journal article

Sakurai M, Griep LMO, Daviglus M, Garside DB, Van Horn LV, Miura K, Nakagawa H, Ueshima H, Chan Q, Elliott P, Stamler Jet al., 2013, Dietary Intakes of Rice, Bread, Pasta, Potatoes and Blood Pressure: The International Study of Macro/Micro-nutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP), Scientific Sessions of the American-Heart-Association on Epidemiology and Prevention/Physical Activity, Nutrition and Metabolism, Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, ISSN: 0009-7322

Conference paper

Oude Griep LM, Stamler J, Chan Q, Van Horn L, Steffen LM, Miura K, Ueshima H, Okuda N, Zhao L, Daviglus ML, Elliott P, For the INTERMAP Research Groupet al., 2013, Soy foods, beans, total legume consumption and blood pressure: The INTERMAP study, Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention – and Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism Scientific Meeting of the American Heart Association.

Conference paper

Oude Griep LM, Stamler J, Chan Q, Van Horn L, Steffen LM, Miura K, Ueshima H, Okuda N, Zhao L, Daviglus ML, Elliott P, For the INTERMAP Research Groupet al., 2013, Color of fruits, vegetables and blood pressure: The INTERMAP study, Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention – and Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism Scientific Meeting of the American Heart Association.

Conference paper

Oude Griep LM, Wang H, Chan C, 2013, Empirically derived dietary patterns, diet quality scores, and markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, Current Nutrition Reports, Vol: 2, Pages: 97-104

Journal article

Griep LMO, Verschuren WMM, Kromhout D, Ocke MC, Geleijnse JMet al., 2012, Variety in fruit and vegetable consumption and 10-year incidence of CHD and stroke, PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION, Vol: 15, Pages: 2280-2286, ISSN: 1368-9800

Journal article

Giltay EJ, Geleijnse JM, Heijboer AC, de Goede J, Griep LMO, Blankenstein MA, Kromhout Det al., 2012, No effects of n-3 fatty acid supplementation on serum total testosterone levels in older men: the Alpha Omega Trial, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ANDROLOGY, Vol: 35, Pages: 680-687, ISSN: 0105-6263

Journal article

Oude Griep LM, Stamler J, Chan Q, Van Horn L, Steffen LM, Miura K, Ueshima H, Nagako O, Zhao L, Daviglus ML, Elliott P, for the INTERMAP Research groupet al., 2012, Fruit (raw, total), fruit juice intake and blood pressure: the INTERMAP Study, Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Hypertension

Conference paper

Soedamah-Muthu SS, Geleijnse JM, Giltay EJ, de Goede J, Griep LMO, Waterham E, Teitsma-Jansen AM, Mulder BJM, de Boer M-J, Deckers JW, Zock PL, Kromhout Det al., 2012, Levels and trends in cardiovascular risk factors and drug treatment in 4837 elderly Dutch myocardial infarction patients between 2002 and 2006, NETHERLANDS HEART JOURNAL, Vol: 20, Pages: 102-109, ISSN: 1568-5888

Journal article

Kromhout D, Geleijnse JM, de Goede J, Griep LMO, Mulder BJM, de Boer M-J, Deckers JW, Boersma E, Zock PL, Giltay EJet al., 2011, n-3 Fatty Acids, Ventricular Arrhythmia-Related Events, and Fatal Myocardial Infarction in Postmyocardial Infarction Patients With Diabetes, DIABETES CARE, Vol: 34, Pages: 2515-2520, ISSN: 0149-5992

Journal article

Griep LMO, Verschuren WMM, Kromhout D, Ocke MC, Geleijnse JMet al., 2011, Colours of fruit and vegetables and 10-year incidence of CHD, BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, Vol: 106, Pages: 1562-1569, ISSN: 0007-1145

Journal article

Oude Griep LM, Verschuren WMM, Kromhout D, Ocke MC, Geleijnse JMet al., 2011, Colors of Fruit and Vegetables and 10-Year Incidence of Stroke, STROKE, Vol: 42, Pages: 3190-3195, ISSN: 0039-2499

Journal article

Oude Griep LM, Verschuren WMM, Kromhout D, Ocke MC, Geleijnse JMet al., 2011, Raw and processed fruit and vegetable consumption and 10-year stroke incidence in a population-based cohort study in the Netherlands, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 65, Pages: 791-799, ISSN: 0954-3007

Journal article

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