Imperial College London

ProfessorMajidEzzati

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Chair in Global Environmental Health
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 0767majid.ezzati Website

 
 
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Location

 

Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

330 results found

Bennett JE, Li G, Kontis V, Foreman K, Ezzati Met al., 2015, Future inequalities in life expectancy in England and Wales Reply, Lancet, Vol: 386, Pages: 2391-2392, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

Leon DA, Ezzati M, 2015, High cardiovascular mortality in Russia: role of alcohol versus smoking, blood pressure, and treatment REPLY, NATURE REVIEWS CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1759-5002

Journal article

Sudfeld CR, McCoy DC, Fink G, Muhihi A, Bellinger DC, Masanja H, Smith ER, Danaei G, Ezzati M, Fawzi WWet al., 2015, Malnutrition and Its Determinants Are Associated with Suboptimal Cognitive, Communication, and Motor Development in Tanzanian Children, JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, Vol: 145, Pages: 2705-2714, ISSN: 0022-3166

Journal article

Arku RE, Dionisio KL, Hughes AF, Vallarino J, Spengler JD, Castro MC, Agyei-Mensah S, Ezzati Met al., 2015, Personal particulate matter exposures and locations of students in four neighborhoods in Accra, Ghana, JOURNAL OF EXPOSURE SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 25, Pages: 557-566, ISSN: 1559-0631

Journal article

Kozuki N, Katz J, Lee ACC, Vogel JP, Silveira MF, Sania A, Stevens GA, Cousens S, Caulfield LE, Christian P, Huybregts L, Roberfroid D, Schmiegelow C, Adair LS, Barrosi FC, Cowan M, Fawzi W, Kolsteren P, Merialdi M, Mongkolchati A, Saville N, Victora CG, Bhutta ZA, Blencowe H, Ezzati M, Lawn JE, Black REet al., 2015, Short Maternal Stature Increases Risk of Small-for-Gestational-Age and Preterm Births in Low-and Middle-Income Countries: Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis and Population Attributable Fraction, JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, Vol: 145, Pages: 2542-2550, ISSN: 0022-3166

Journal article

Kontis V, Mathers CD, Bonita R, Stevens GA, Rehm J, Shield KD, Riley LM, Poznyak V, Jabbour S, Garg RM, Hennis A, Fouad HM, Beaglehole R, Ezzati Met al., 2015, Regional contributions of six preventable risk factors to achieving the 25 × 25 non-communicable disease mortality reduction target: a modelling study, Lancet Global Health, Vol: 3, Pages: e746-e757, ISSN: 2214-109X

BackgroundCountries have agreed to reduce premature mortality from the four main non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 25% from 2010 levels by 2025 (referred to as the 25 × 25 target). Countries also agreed on a set of global voluntary targets for selected NCD risk factors. Previous analyses have shown that achieving the risk factor targets can contribute substantially towards meeting the 25 × 25 mortality target at the global level. We estimated the contribution of achieving six of the globally agreed risk factor targets towards meeting the 25 × 25 mortality target by region.MethodsWe estimated the effect of achieving the targets for six risk factors (tobacco and alcohol use, salt intake, obesity, and raised blood pressure and glucose) on NCD mortality between 2010 and 2025. Our methods accounted for multicausality of NCDs and for the fact that, when risk factor exposure increases or decreases, the harmful or beneficial effects on NCDs accumulate gradually. We used data for risk factor and mortality trends from systematic analyses of available country data. Relative risks for the effects of individual and multiple risks, and for change in risk after decreases or increases in exposure, were from reanalyses and meta-analyses of epidemiological studies.FindingsThe probability of dying between the ages 30 years and 70 years from the four main NCDs in 2010 ranged from 19% in the region of the Americas to 29% in southeast Asia for men, and from 13% in Europe to 21% in southeast Asia for women. If current trends continue, the probability of dying prematurely from the four main NCDs is projected to increase in the African region but decrease in the other five regions. If the risk factor targets are achieved, the 25 × 25 target will be surpassed in Europe in both men and women, and will be achieved in women (and almost achieved in men) in the western Pacific; the regions of the Americas, the eastern Mediterranean, and southeast Asia will approach the t

Journal article

Pope CA, Ezzati M, Dockery DW, 2015, Tradeoffs between income, air pollution and life expectancy: Brief report on the US experience, 1980-2000, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, Vol: 142, Pages: 591-593, ISSN: 0013-9351

Journal article

Newton JN, Briggs ADM, Murray CJL, Dicker D, Foreman KJ, Wang H, Naghavi M, Forouzanfar MH, Ohno SL, Barber RM, Vos T, Stanaway JRD, Schmidt JC, Hughes AJ, Fay DFJ, Ecob R, Gresser C, McKee M, Rutter H, Abubakar I, Ali R, Anderson HR, Banerjee A, Bennett DA, Bernabe E, Bhui KS, Biryukov SM, Bourne RR, Brayne CEG, Bruce NG, Brugha TS, Burch M, Capewell S, Casey D, Chowdhury R, Coates MM, Cooper C, Critchley JA, Dargan PI, Dherani MK, Elliott P, Ezzati M, Fenton KA, Fraser MS, Fuerst T, Greaves F, Green MA, Gunnell DJ, Hannigan BM, Hay RJ, Hay SI, Hemingway H, Larson HJ, Looker KJ, Lunevicius R, Lyons RA, Marcenes W, Mason-Jones AJ, Matthews FE, Moller H, Murdoch ME, Newton CR, Pearce N, Piel FB, Pope D, Rahimi K, Rodriguez A, Scarborough P, Schumacher AE, Shiue I, Smeeth L, Tedstone A, Valabhji J, Williams HC, Wolfe CDA, Woolf AD, Davis ACJet al., 2015, Changes in health in England, with analysis by English regions and areas of deprivation, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013, Lancet, Vol: 386, Pages: 2257-2274, ISSN: 1474-547X

Journal article

Peet ED, McCoy DC, Danaei G, Ezzati M, Fawzi W, Jarvelin M-R, Pillas D, Fink Get al., 2015, Early Childhood Development and Schooling Attainment: Longitudinal Evidence from British, Finnish and Philippine Birth Cohorts, PLOS One, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1932-6203

BackgroundWhile recent literature has highlighted the importance of early childhood development for later life outcomes, comparatively little is known regarding the relative importance of early physical and cognitive development in predicting educational attainment cross-culturally.MethodsWe used prospective data from three birth cohorts: the Northern Finland Birth Cohort of 1986 (NFBC1986), the 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS1970), and the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey of 1983 (CLHNS) to assess the association of height-for-age z-score (HAZ) and cognitive development measured prior to age 8 with schooling attainment. Multivariate linear regression models were used to estimate baseline and adjusted associations.ResultsBoth physical and cognitive development were highly predictive of adult educational attainment conditional on parental characteristics. The largest positive associations between physical development and schooling were found in the CLHNS (β = 0.53, 95%-CI: [0.32, 0.74]) with substantially smaller associations in the BCS1970 (β = 0.10, 95% CI [0.04, 0.16]) and the NFBC1986 (β = 0.06, 95% CI [-0.05, 0.16]). Strong associations between cognitive development and educational attainment were found for all three cohorts (NFBC1986: β = 0.22, 95%-CI: [0.12, 0.31], BCS1970: β = 0.58, 95%-CI: [0.52, 0.64], CLHNS: β = 1.08, 95%-CI: [0.88, 1.27]). Models jointly estimating educational associations of physical and cognitive development demonstrated weaker associations for physical development and minimal changes for cognitive development.ConclusionThe results indicate that although physical and cognitive early development are both important predictors of educational attainment, cognitive development appears to play a particularly important role. The large degree of heterogeneity in the observed effect sizes suggest that the importance of early life physical growth and cognitive development is highly dependent on socioecono

Journal article

Ezzati M, Obermeyer Z, Tzoulaki I, Mayosi BM, Elliott P, Leon DAet al., 2015, Contributions of risk factors and medical care to cardiovascular mortality trends, NATURE REVIEWS CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 12, Pages: 508-530, ISSN: 1759-5002

Journal article

Hogan DR, Danaei G, Ezzati M, Clarke PM, Jha AK, Salomon JAet al., 2015, Estimating The Potential Impact Of Insurance Expansion On Undiagnosed And Uncontrolled Chronic Conditions, HEALTH AFFAIRS, Vol: 34, Pages: 1554-1562, ISSN: 0278-2715

Journal article

Finucane MM, Paciorek CJ, Stevens GA, Ezzati Met al., 2015, Semiparametric Bayesian Density Estimation With Disparate Data Sources: A Meta-Analysis of Global Childhood Undernutrition, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN STATISTICAL ASSOCIATION, Vol: 110, Pages: 889-901, ISSN: 0162-1459

Journal article

Ali MK, Jaacks LM, Kowalski AJ, Siegel KR, Ezzati Met al., 2015, Noncommunicable Diseases: Three Decades Of Global Data Show A Mixture Of Increases And Decreases In Mortality Rates, HEALTH AFFAIRS, Vol: 34, Pages: 1444-1455, ISSN: 0278-2715

Journal article

Stevens GA, Bennett JE, Hennocq Q, Lu Y, De-Regil LM, Rogers L, Danaei G, Li G, White RA, Flaxman SR, Oehrle S-P, Finucane MM, Guerrero R, Bhutta ZA, Then-Paulino A, Fawzi W, Black RE, Ezzati Met al., 2015, Trends and mortality effects of vitamin A deficiency in children in 138 low-income and middle-income countries between 1991 and 2013: a pooled analysis of population-based surveys, Lancet Global Health, Vol: 3, Pages: e528-e536, ISSN: 2214-109X

Background: Vitamin A deficiency is a risk factor for blindness and for mortality from measles and diarrhoea in children aged 6–59 months. We aimed to estimate trends in the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency between 1991 and 2013 and its mortality burden in low-income and middle-income countries.Methods: We collated 134 population-representative data sources from 83 countries with measured serum retinol concentration data. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency, defined as a serum retinol concentration lower than 0·70 μmol/L. We estimated the relative risks (RRs) for the effects of vitamin A deficiency on mortality from measles and diarrhoea by pooling effect sizes from randomised trials of vitamin A supplementation. We used information about prevalences of deficiency, RRs, and number of cause-specific child deaths to estimate deaths attributable to vitamin A deficiency. All analyses included a systematic quantification of uncertainty.Findings: In 1991, 39% (95% credible interval 27–52) of children aged 6–59 months in low-income and middle-income countries were vitamin A deficient. In 2013, the prevalence of deficiency was 29% (17–42; posterior probability [PP] of being a true decline=0·81). Vitamin A deficiency significantly declined in east and southeast Asia and Oceania from 42% (19–70) to 6% (1–16; PP>0·99); a decline in Latin America and the Caribbean from 21% (11–33) to 11% (4–23; PP=0·89) also occurred. In 2013, the prevalence of deficiency was highest in sub-Saharan Africa (48%; 25–75) and south Asia (44%; 13–79). 94 500 (54 200–146 800) deaths from diarrhoea and 11 200 (4300–20 500) deaths from measles were attributable to vitamin A deficiency in 2013, which accounted for 1·7% (1·0–2·6) of all deaths in children younger than 5 years in low-income and middle-income countries. M

Journal article

Singh GM, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Lim S, Ezzati M, Mozaffarian Det al., 2015, Estimated Global, Regional, and National Disease Burdens Related to Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in 2010, CIRCULATION, Vol: 132, Pages: 639-666, ISSN: 0009-7322

Journal article

Singh GM, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Shi P, Lim S, Andrews KG, Engell RE, Ezzati M, Mozaffarian Det al., 2015, Global, Regional, and National Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, Fruit Juices, and Milk: A Systematic Assessment of Beverage Intake in 187 Countries, PLOS One, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1932-6203

BackgroundSugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), fruit juice, and milk are components of diet of major public health interest. To-date, assessment of their global distributions and health impacts has been limited by insufficient comparable and reliable data by country, age, and sex.ObjectiveTo quantify global, regional, and national levels of SSB, fruit juice, and milk intake by age and sex in adults over age 20 in 2010.MethodsWe identified, obtained, and assessed data on intakes of these beverages in adults, by age and sex, from 193 nationally- or subnationally-representative diet surveys worldwide, representing over half the world’s population. We also extracted data relevant to milk, fruit juice, and SSB availability for 187 countries from annual food balance information collected by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. We developed a hierarchical Bayesian model to account for measurement incomparability, study representativeness, and sampling and modeling uncertainty, and to combine and harmonize nationally representative dietary survey data and food availability data.ResultsIn 2010, global average intakes were 0.58 (95%UI: 0.37, 0.89) 8 oz servings/day for SSBs, 0.16 (0.10, 0.26) for fruit juice, and 0.57 (0.39, 0.83) for milk. There was significant heterogeneity in consumption of each beverage by region and age. Intakes of SSB were highest in the Caribbean (1.9 servings/day; 1.2, 3.0); fruit juice consumption was highest in Australia and New Zealand (0.66; 0.35, 1.13); and milk intake was highest in Central Latin America and parts of Europe (1.06; 0.68, 1.59). Intakes of all three beverages were lowest in East Asia and Oceania. Globally and within regions, SSB consumption was highest in younger adults; fruit juice consumption showed little relation with age; and milk intakes were highest in older adults.ConclusionsOur analysis highlights the enormous spectrum of beverage intakes worldwide, by country, age, and sex. These data are valuable for

Journal article

Dominici F, Wang Y, Correia AW, Ezzati M, Pope CA, Dockery DWet al., 2015, Chemical Composition of Fine Particulate Matter and Life Expectancy In 95 US Counties Between 2002 and 2007, EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 26, Pages: 556-564, ISSN: 1044-3983

Journal article

Ezzati M, Danaei G, Fahimi S, Lu Y, Zhou B, Hajifathalian K, Di Cesare M, Lo W, Reis-Santos B, Cowan MJ, Shaw JE, Bentham J, Lin JK, Bixby H, Magliano D, Bovet P, Miranda JJ, Khang Y, Stevens GA, Riley LM, Ali MKet al., 2015, Effects of diabetes definition on global surveillance of diabetes prevalence and diagnosis: a pooled analysis of 96 population-based studies with 331 288 participants, The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, Vol: 3, Pages: 624-637, ISSN: 2213-8587

Background: Over time, diabetes has been defined based on different biomarkers, includingfasting plasma glucose (FPG) or 2-hour plasma glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test (2hOGTT) and,more recently, haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). We examined the influence of diagnostic definitions on boththe population prevalence of diabetes and the classification of previously-undiagnosed individuals aswith vs. without diabetes in a pooled analysis of data from population-based health examinationsurveys in different world regions.

Journal article

Shin HH, Cohen AJ, Pope CA, Ezzati M, Lim SS, Hubbell BJ, Burnett RTet al., 2015, Meta-Analysis Methods to Estimate the Shape and Uncertainty in the Association Between Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Fine Particulate Matter and Cause-Specific Mortality Over the Global Concentration Range, RISK ANALYSIS, Vol: 36, Pages: 1813-1825, ISSN: 0272-4332

Journal article

Sudfeld CR, Mccoy DC, Danaei G, Fink G, Ezzati M, Andrews KG, Fawzi WWet al., 2015, Linear Growth and Child Development in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Meta-Analysis, PEDIATRICS, Vol: 135, Pages: E1266-E1275, ISSN: 0031-4005

Journal article

Pan S-C, Ku C-C, Kao D, Ezzati M, Fang C-T, Lin H-Het al., 2015, Effect of diabetes on tuberculosis control in 13 countries with high tuberculosis: a modelling study, LANCET DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY, Vol: 3, Pages: 323-330, ISSN: 2213-8587

Journal article

Hajifathalian K, Ueda P, Lu Y, Woodward M, Ahmadvand A, Aguilar-Salinas CA, Azizi F, Cifkova R, Di Cesare M, Eriksen L, Farzadfar F, Ikeda N, Khalili D, Khang Y-H, Lanska V, Leon-Munoz L, Magliano D, Msyamboza KP, Oh K, Rodriguez-Artalejo F, Rojas-Martinez R, Shaw JE, Stevens GA, Tolstrup J, Zhou B, Salomon JA, Ezzati M, Danaei Get al., 2015, A novel risk score to predict cardiovascular disease risk in national populations (Globorisk): a pooled analysis of prospective cohorts and health examination surveys, LANCET DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY, Vol: 3, Pages: 339-355, ISSN: 2213-8587

Journal article

Bennett JE, Li G, Foreman K, Best N, Kontis V, Pearson C, Hambly P, Ezzati Met al., 2015, The future of life expectancy and life expectancy inequalities in England and Wales: Bayesian spatiotemporal forecasting, Lancet, Vol: 386, Pages: 163-170, ISSN: 0140-6736

Background: To plan for pensions and health and social services, future mortality and life expectancy need to be forecast. Consistent forecasts for all subnational units within a country are very rare. Our aim was to forecast mortality and life expectancy for England and Wales' districts.Methods: We developed Bayesian spatiotemporal models for forecasting of age-specific mortality and life expectancy at a local, small-area level. The models included components that accounted for mortality in relation to age, birth cohort, time, and space. We used geocoded mortality and population data between 1981 and 2012 from the Office for National Statistics together with the model with the smallest error to forecast age-specific death rates and life expectancy to 2030 for 375 of England and Wales' 376 districts. We measured model performance by withholding recent data and comparing forecasts with this withheld data.Findings: Life expectancy at birth in England and Wales was 79·5 years (95% credible interval 79·5–79·6) for men and 83·3 years (83·3–83·4) for women in 2012. District life expectancies ranged between 75·2 years (74·9–75·6) and 83·4 years (82·1–84·8) for men and between 80·2 years (79·8–80·5) and 87·3 years (86·0–88·8) for women. Between 1981 and 2012, life expectancy increased by 8·2 years for men and 6·0 years for women, closing the female–male gap from 6·0 to 3·8 years. National life expectancy in 2030 is expected to reach 85·7 (84·2–87·4) years for men and 87·6 (86·7–88·9) years for women, further reducing the female advantage to 1·9 years. Life expectancy will reach or surpass 81·4 years for men and reach or surpass 84·5 years for women in every district by 2030. Longevity inequality across distr

Journal article

Di Cesare M, Bhatti Z, Soofi SB, Fortunato L, Ezzati M, Bhutta ZAet al., 2015, Geographical and socioeconomic inequalities in women and children's nutritional status in Pakistan in 2011: an analysis of data from a nationally representative survey., The Lancet Global Health, Vol: 3, Pages: e229-e239, ISSN: 2214-109X

Pakistan has one of the highest levels of child and maternal undernutrition worldwide, but little information about geographical and socioeconomic inequalities is available. We aimed to analyse anthropometric indicators for childhood and maternal nutrition at a district level in Pakistan and assess the association of nutritional status with food security and maternal and household socioeconomic factors.

Journal article

Lu Y, Hajifathalian K, Rimm EB, Ezzati M, Danaei Get al., 2015, Mediators of the Effect of Body Mass Index on Coronary Heart Disease Decomposing Direct and Indirect Effects, EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 26, Pages: 153-162, ISSN: 1044-3983

Journal article

Hajifathalian K, Ezzati M, Salomon J, Lu Y, Woodward M, Danaei Get al., 2015, A Model for Estimating Future Risk of Fatal Coronary Heart Disease for Global Populations (USA)., 20th IEA World Congress of Epidemiology (WCE), Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, Pages: 16-16, ISSN: 0300-5771

Conference paper

Arnold M, Pandeya N, Byrnes G, Renehan AG, Stevens GA, Ezzati M, Ferlay J, Miranda JJ, Romieu I, Dikshit R, Forman D, Soerjomataram Iet al., 2015, Global burden of cancer attributable to high body-mass index in 2012: a population-based study, LANCET ONCOLOGY, Vol: 16, Pages: 36-46, ISSN: 1470-2045

Journal article

Afshin A, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Fahimi S, Shi P, Powles J, Singh G, Yakoob MY, Abdollahi M, Al-Hooti S, Farzadfar F, Houshiar-rad A, Hwalla N, Koksal E, Musaiger A, Pekcan G, Sibai AM, Zaghloul S, Danaei G, Ezzati M, Mozaffarian Det al., 2015, The impact of dietary habits and metabolic risk factors on cardiovascular and diabetes mortality in countries of the Middle East and North Africa in 2010: a comparative risk assessment analysis, BMJ OPEN, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Feigin VL, Krishnamurthi RV, Parmar P, Norrving B, Mensah GA, Bennett DA, Barker-Collo S, Moran AE, Sacco RL, Truelsen T, Davis S, Pandian JD, Naghavi M, Forouzanfar MH, Nguyen G, Johnson CO, Vos T, Meretoja A, Murray CJL, Roth GA, Group GBDW, Group GBDSPEet al., 2015, Update on the Global Burden of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke in 1990-2013: The GBD 2013 Study, Neuroepidemiology, Vol: 45, Pages: 161-176

BACKGROUND: Global stroke epidemiology is changing rapidly. Although age-standardized rates of stroke mortality have decreased worldwide in the past 2 decades, the absolute numbers of people who have a stroke every year, and live with the consequences of stroke or die from their stroke, are increasing. Regular updates on the current level of stroke burden are important for advancing our knowledge on stroke epidemiology and facilitate organization and planning of evidence-based stroke care. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to estimate incidence, prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs) and their trends for ischemic stroke (IS) and hemorrhagic stroke (HS) for 188 countries from 1990 to 2013. METHODOLOGY: Stroke incidence, prevalence, mortality, DALYs and YLDs were estimated using all available data on mortality and stroke incidence, prevalence and excess mortality. Statistical models and country-level covariate data were employed, and all rates were age-standardized to a global population. All estimates were produced with 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs). RESULTS: In 2013, there were globally almost 25.7 million stroke survivors (71% with IS), 6.5 million deaths from stroke (51% died from IS), 113 million DALYs due to stroke (58% due to IS) and 10.3 million new strokes (67% IS). Over the 1990-2013 period, there was a significant increase in the absolute number of DALYs due to IS, and of deaths from IS and HS, survivors and incident events for both IS and HS. The preponderance of the burden of stroke continued to reside in developing countries, comprising 75.2% of deaths from stroke and 81.0% of stroke-related DALYs. Globally, the proportional contribution of stroke-related DALYs and deaths due to stroke compared to all diseases increased from 1990 (3.54% (95% UI 3.11-4.00) and 9.66% (95% UI 8.47-10.70), respectively) to 2013 (4.62% (95% UI 4.01-5.30) and 11.75% (95% UI 10.45-13.31), respectively), but there was a d

Journal article

Shan M, Yang X, Ezzati M, Chaturvedi N, Coady E, Hughes A, Shi Y, Yang M, Zhang Y, Baumgartner Jet al., 2014, A feasibility study of the association of exposure to biomass smoke with vascular function, inflammation, and cellular aging, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, Vol: 135, Pages: 165-172, ISSN: 0013-9351

Journal article

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