Human Robotics

the robotics of human, robotics for humans

The Human Robotics Group at Imperial (HRG) is part of the Bioengineering Department. It uses an integrative approach of neuroscience and robotics to investigate human sensorimotor control, and to design efficient assistive devices and training systems for neuro-rehabilitation, which are tested in clinical trialsThis approach has generated promising projects and significant results in various areas from computational neuroscience to medical robotics, neural engineering and tissue engineering, some of which are described here. HRG is affiliated with the Centre of Neurotechnology and is part of robotics@imperial.

Please contact Professor Etienne Burdet if you have any queries, are interested in collaborating, or to co-develop an idea or product. It is always possible to find an opportunity for exceptional students and ideas.

 

News and recent publications

Pizza smart tech helps stroke patients regain their mobility

A digital pizza has been created by robotics experts to help stroke patients regain their mobility. The device, designed by Imperial College London, allows doctors to track their patients’ progress. Read the full article.

 

New technology gives rider with disabilities control of the reins for first time

picHorse riding is a form of therapy known to have positive effects on the physical and mental abilities of riders who have disabilities. Scientists from Human Robotics Group and Shadow Robotics have volunteered their time to develop a device that has enabled a person with disabilities to ride a horse on his own for the first time. Read the full article.

Clinical Neurology

cn.newsA digital handgrip developed at the Human Robotics Group allowed more patients with arm weakness caused by a stroke to  self-rehabilitate than did the use of standard mobile device touch screen controls in a 6-month, single-center survey. Read the full article.

Nature
neture

Etienne Burdet leans over a glass table, places his elbow in a spring-loaded support clamped to its edge and uses both hands to cut a virtual tomato into thin slices. The tomato is one of several manipulable objects displayed on a touchscreen fitted with force and motion sensors, motors and light-emitting diodes, all of which are connected by Bluetooth to an Android tablet. Read the full article.

Two to tango

twototango

They say it takes two to tango and it seems that for physical tasks, practising with a partner really does improve performance. Our study reveals how touch plays a vital and very subtle role in helping people to transmit information to one another. Read the full article.