Imperial College London

ProfessorJenniferWhyte

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Laing O'Rourke/RAEng Chair in Systems Integration
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 9245j.whyte Website

 
 
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Assistant

 

Mr Tim Gordon +44 (0)20 7594 5031

 
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Location

 

436Skempton BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

49 results found

Comi A, Whyte J, Future making and visual artefacts: an ethnographic study of a design project, Organization Studies, ISSN: 1741-3044

Current research on strategizing and organizing has explored how practitioners make sense of an uncertain future, but provides limited explanations of how they actually make a realisable course of action for the future. A focus on making rather than sensemaking brings into view the visual artefactsthat practitioners use in giving form to what is ‘not yet’ –drawings, models, and sketches. We explore howvisual artefacts are used in making a realisable course of action, by analysing ethnographic data from an architectural studio leading the design of a development strategy for Kew Gardens, UK. We document how visual artefacts became enrolled in practices of imagining, testing, stabilisingand reifying;through which abstract imaginings of the future are turned into a realisable course of action. We then elaborate on higher-order findings that are generalizable to a wide range of organizational settings, and discuss their implications for future research in strategizing and organizing. This paper contributes in two ways: Firstly, it offers future makingas a novel perspective on how practitioners orient themselves towards the future (different from current perspectives suchas foreseeing, future perfect thinking, and wayfinding). Secondly, it advances our understanding of visual artefacts and their performativity in the making of organisational futures.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

K Soman R, Whyte J, A Framework for Cloud-Based Virtual and Augmented Reality using Real-time Information for Construction Progress Monitoring, Lean and Computing in Construction Congress (LC3).

CONFERENCE PAPER

Brookes N, Sage D, Dainty A, Locatelli G, Whyte Jet al., 2017, An island of constancy in a sea of change: Rethinking project temporalities with long-term megaprojects, International Journal of Project Management, Vol: 35, Pages: 1213-1224, ISSN: 0263-7863

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd, APM and IPMA This paper examines the organizational phenomena of long-term projects. While research literature frames projects as “temporary organizations”, megaprojects have long initiation and delivery phases, lasting years sometimes decades, and deliver capital assets that are used for decades or centuries. Instead of short-duration activity within a fixed organizational context, these projects involve multiple temporalities, combining more and less temporary forms of organizing in the process of enactment. Using an example of a long-term infrastructural megaproject, a wind-farm, to illustrate the phenomenon, we contribute by articulating different temporalities associated with the delivery project, life-cycle; stakeholder organizations that set up the project; and special purpose vehicles through which it is delivered. Implications of these temporalities for project management research and practice are discussed with reference to understandings of risk and knowledge. We argue that focus on long-term projects and their multiple temporalities opens up new ways of thinking about projects as temporary organizations.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lobo S, Whyte J, 2017, Aligning and Reconciling: Building project capabilities for digital delivery, RESEARCH POLICY, Vol: 46, Pages: 93-107, ISSN: 0048-7333

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Soman RK, Birch D, Whyte JK, 2017, Framework for shared visualization and real-Time information flow to the construction site, Pages: 286-293

The aim of this paper is to develop a framework for shared visualization between design office and construction office using augmented reality as a platform with a focus on the security of Building Information Model. The current paper is part of an ongoing study aimed at creating a real-Time bi-directional information flow between the construction office and site and focuses on a shared visualisation context. A framework architecture for enabling shared visualisation with a stress on the security of Building Information Model is discussed. A prototype application based on the framework was deployed on an Android device in a controlled environment for testing. The application augmented Building Information objects dynamically to the real-world without any latency. Salient features of the prototype include dynamic loading of Building Information content during the runtime, data encapsulation based on user privileges, deployability on portable low-end computing devices etc. Using shared visualization would empower the construction engineers with real-Time models updates with access to many near-optimal management solutions. This enables the engineers to narrow in on the best solution under given constraints.

CONFERENCE PAPER

Whyte JK, Hartmann T, 2017, How digitizing building information transforms the built environment, BUILDING RESEARCH AND INFORMATION, Vol: 45, Pages: 591-595, ISSN: 0961-3218

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, 2016, The future of systems integration within civil infrastructure: A review and directions for research, Pages: 1541-1555, ISSN: 2334-5837

CONFERENCE PAPER

Whyte J, Lindkvist C, Jaradat S, 2016, Passing the baton? Handing over digital data from the project to operations, Engineering Project Organization Journal, Vol: 6, Pages: 2-14, ISSN: 2157-3727

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, Stasis A, Lindkvist C, 2016, Managing change in the delivery of complex projects: Configuration management, asset information and 'big data', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT, Vol: 34, Pages: 339-351, ISSN: 0263-7863

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, Tryggestad K, Comi A, 2016, Visualizing practices in project-based design: tracing connections through cascades of visual representations, Engineering Project Organization Journal, Vol: 6, Pages: 115-128, ISSN: 2157-3727

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Sacks R, Whyte J, Swissa D, Raviv G, Zhou W, Shapira Aet al., 2015, Safety by design: dialogues between designers and builders using virtual reality, CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AND ECONOMICS, Vol: 33, Pages: 55-72, ISSN: 0144-6193

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ramalingam S, Lobo S, Mahalingam A, Whyte Jet al., 2014, Achieving reliability in transnational work on complex projects: new directions for research, Engineering Project Organization Journal, Vol: 4, Pages: 193-208, ISSN: 2157-3727

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Jaradat S, Whyte J, Luck R, 2013, Professionalism in digitally mediated project work, BUILDING RESEARCH AND INFORMATION, Vol: 41, Pages: 51-59, ISSN: 0961-3218

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Larsen GD, Whyte J, 2013, Safe construction through design: perspectives from the site team, Construction Management and Economics, Vol: 31, Pages: 675-690, ISSN: 0144-6193

How does the work of designers impact on the safety of operatives at the construction site? Safety research and policy emphasize the importance of designing for safe construction, yet the interface between design and construction is poorly understood: accidents have multiple causes making it hard to establish causal links between design choices and safety outcomes. An in-depth case study of a major station project examines how professionals on the construction site perceive and manage the safety challenges of a building design. Analyses reveal understandings that, on the project studied, design has an impact on safety because of: (1) the timing of design work, where the volume of late design changes increased the difficulty of planning safe procedures, e.g. for working at height, lifting heavy items, refurbishing and demolishing old buildings; and (2) inputs from design stakeholders with insufficient practical knowledge of construction and operation required unplanned work-arounds, e.g. to coordinate different sub-systems, provide maintenance access, and manage loads during construction. These findings suggest that safety suffers where projects are under-designed, and that alongside regulation, there is a need for robust management attention to the contractual structures, incentives, processes and tools that enable clients and designers to understand material practices of construction and operation. © 2013 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, 2013, Beyond the computer: Changing medium from digital to physical, INFORMATION AND ORGANIZATION, Vol: 23, Pages: 41-57, ISSN: 1471-7727

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, Lindkvist C, Ibrahim NH, 2013, From projects into operations: Lessons for data handover, Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Management, Procurement and Law, Vol: 166, Pages: 86-93, ISSN: 1751-4304

Data from civil engineering projects can inform the operation of built infrastructure. This paper captures lessons for such data handover, from projects into operations, through interviews with leading clients and their supply chain. Clients are found to value receiving accurate and complete data. They recognise opportunities to use high-quality information in decision-making about capital and operational expenditure, as well as in ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements. Providing this value to clients is a motivation for information management in projects. However, data handover is difficult as key people leave before project completion, and different data formats and structures are used in project delivery and operations. Lessons learnt from leading practice include defining data requirements at the outset, involving operations teams at an early stage, shaping the evolution of interoperable systems and standards, developing handover processes to check data rather than documentation and fostering skills to use and update project data in operations.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Zhou W, Whyte J, Sacks R, 2012, Construction safety and digital design: A review, AUTOMATION IN CONSTRUCTION, Vol: 22, Pages: 102-111, ISSN: 0926-5805

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, 2011, Managing digital coordination of design: emerging hybrid practices in an institutionalized project setting, Engineering Project Organization Journal, Vol: 1, Pages: 159-168, ISSN: 2157-3727

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, Levitt R, 2011, Information Management and the Management of Projects, The Oxford Handbook of Project Management, ISBN: 9780191724879

© Oxford University Press 2011. All rights reserved. This article argues that emerging digital technologies are enabling new forms of project management in project-based industries. The 1960s project management approach originated in the mature project-based industries of petrochemicals, military, advanced manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, buildings, and infrastructure. This approach, which is termed "Project Management 1.0" (PM 1.0), evolved to manage small numbers of large, complex projects in business and regulatory environments that were relatively stable by today's standards. It involves detailed up-front planning, using multiple layers of hierarchical work breakdown structures. It then manages these projects by tracking and eliminating variance from plans. The approach is alive and well in some of those same industries, and has been greatly enhanced by widespread use of digital technologies for planning, visualization, communication, procurement, logistics, and other functions. However, there are important ways in which the use of information technology begins to challenge this traditional project management approach.

BOOK CHAPTER

Whyte J, Sexton M, 2011, Motivations for innovation in the built environment: new directions for research, BUILDING RESEARCH AND INFORMATION, Vol: 39, Pages: 473-482, ISSN: 0961-3218

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Harty C, Whyte J, 2010, Emerging Hybrid Practices in Construction Design Work: Role of Mixed Media, JOURNAL OF CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT-ASCE, Vol: 136, Pages: 468-476, ISSN: 0733-9364

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, Lobo S, 2010, Coordination and control in project-based work: Digital objects and infrastructures for delivery, Construction Management and Economics, Vol: 28, Pages: 557-567, ISSN: 0144-6193

A major infrastructure project is used to investigate the role of digital objects in the coordination of engineering design work. From a practice-based perspective, research emphasizes objects as important in enabling cooperative knowledge work and knowledge sharing. The term 'boundary object' has become used in the analysis of mutual and reciprocal knowledge sharing around physical and digital objects. The aim is to extend this work by analysing the introduction of an extranet into the public-private partnership project used to construct a new motorway. Multiple categories of digital objects are mobilized in coordination across heterogeneous, cross-organizational groups. The main findings are that digital objects provide mechanisms for accountability and control, as well as for mutual and reciprocal knowledge sharing; and that different types of objects are nested, forming a digital infrastructure for project delivery. Reconceptualizing boundary objects as a digital infrastructure for delivery has practical implications for management practices on large projects and for the use of digital tools, such as building information models, in construction. It provides a starting point for future research into the changing nature of digitally enabled coordination in project-based work. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte JK, Cardellino P, 2010, Learning by Design: Visual Practices and Organizational Transformation in Schools, DESIGN ISSUES, Vol: 26, Pages: 59-69, ISSN: 0747-9360

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ewenstein B, Whyte J, 2009, Knowledge Practices in Design: The Role of Visual Representations as 'Epistemic Objects', ORGANIZATION STUDIES, Vol: 30, Pages: 7-30, ISSN: 0170-8406

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, Ewenstein B, Hales M, Tidd Jet al., 2008, Visualizing knowledge in project-based work, LONG RANGE PLANNING, Vol: 41, Pages: 74-92, ISSN: 0024-6301

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ewenstein B, Whyte J, 2007, Beyond words: Aesthetic knowledge and knowing in organizations, ORGANIZATION STUDIES, Vol: 28, Pages: 689-708, ISSN: 0170-8406

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ewenstein B, Whyte JK, 2007, Visual representations as 'artefacts of knowing', BUILDING RESEARCH AND INFORMATION, Vol: 35, Pages: 81-89, ISSN: 0961-3218

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, 2007, Evolutionary theories and design practices, DESIGN ISSUES, Vol: 23, Pages: 46-54, ISSN: 0747-9360

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte J, 2007, The Oxford handbook of innovation, ORGANIZATION STUDIES, Vol: 28, Pages: 589-593, ISSN: 0170-8406

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Whyte JK, Ewenstein B, 2007, Visual practices and the built environment, Publisher: TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD

OTHER

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