Imperial College London

DrTarynYoungstein

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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ICTEM buildingHammersmith Campus

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Publications

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81 results found

The ATTACC, ACTIV-4a, and REMAP-CAP Investigators, 2021, Therapeutic anticoagulation with heparin in noncritically Ill patients with Covid-19, New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN: 0028-4793

BACKGROUNDThrombosis and inflammation may contribute to the risk of death and complications among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19). We hypothesized that therapeutic-dose anticoagulation may improve outcomes in noncritically ill patients who are hospitalized with Covid-19.METHODSIn this open-label, adaptive, multiplatform, controlled trial, we randomly assigned patients who were hospitalized with Covid-19 and who were not critically ill (which was defined as an absence of critical care–level organ support at enrollment) to receive pragmatically defined regimens of either therapeutic-dose anticoagulation with heparin or usual-care pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. The primary outcome was organ support–free days, evaluated on an ordinal scale that combined in-hospital death (assigned a value of −1) and the number of days free of cardiovascular or respiratory organ support up to day 21 among patients who survived to hospital discharge. This outcome was evaluated with the use of a Bayesian statistical model for all patients and according to the baseline d-dimer level.RESULTSThe trial was stopped when prespecified criteria for the superiority of therapeutic-dose anticoagulation were met. Among 2219 patients in the final analysis, the probability that therapeutic-dose anticoagulation increased organ support–free days as compared with usual-care thromboprophylaxis was 98.6% (adjusted odds ratio, 1.27; 95% credible interval, 1.03 to 1.58). The adjusted absolute between-group difference in survival until hospital discharge without organ support favoring therapeutic-dose anticoagulation was 4.0 percentage points (95% credible interval, 0.5 to 7.2). The final probability of the superiority of therapeutic-dose anticoagulation over usual-care thromboprophylaxis was 97.3% in the high d-dimer cohort, 92.9% in the low d-dimer cohort, and 97.3% in the unknown d-dimer cohort. Major bleeding occurred in 1.9% of the patients receiving therapeutic

Journal article

The REMAP-CAP, ACTIV-4a, and ATTACC Investigators, 2021, Therapeutic anticoagulation with heparin in critically Ill patients with Covid-19, New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN: 0028-4793

BACKGROUNDThrombosis and inflammation may contribute to morbidity and mortality among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19). We hypothesized that therapeutic-dose anticoagulation would improve outcomes in critically ill patients with Covid-19.METHODSIn an open-label, adaptive, multiplatform, randomized clinical trial, critically ill patients with severe Covid-19 were randomly assigned to a pragmatically defined regimen of either therapeutic-dose anticoagulation with heparin or pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis in accordance with local usual care. The primary outcome was organ support–free days, evaluated on an ordinal scale that combined in-hospital death (assigned a value of −1) and the number of days free of cardiovascular or respiratory organ support up to day 21 among patients who survived to hospital discharge.RESULTSThe trial was stopped when the prespecified criterion for futility was met for therapeutic-dose anticoagulation. Data on the primary outcome were available for 1098 patients (534 assigned to therapeutic-dose anticoagulation and 564 assigned to usual-care thromboprophylaxis). The median value for organ support–free days was 1 (interquartile range, −1 to 16) among the patients assigned to therapeutic-dose anticoagulation and was 4 (interquartile range, −1 to 16) among the patients assigned to usual-care thromboprophylaxis (adjusted proportional odds ratio, 0.83; 95% credible interval, 0.67 to 1.03; posterior probability of futility [defined as an odds ratio <1.2], 99.9%). The percentage of patients who survived to hospital discharge was similar in the two groups (62.7% and 64.5%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio, 0.84; 95% credible interval, 0.64 to 1.11). Major bleeding occurred in 3.8% of the patients assigned to therapeutic-dose anticoagulation and in 2.3% of those assigned to usual-care pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis.CONCLUSIONSIn critically ill patients with Covid-19, an initial strategy of therapeu

Journal article

Arabi Y, Gordon A, Derde L, Nichol A, Murthy S, Al-Beidh F, Annane D, Al Swaidan L, Beane A, Beasley R, Berry L, Bhimani Z, Bonten M, Bradbury C, Brunkhorst F, Buxton M, Buzgau A, Cheng A, De Jong M, Detry M, Duffy E, Estcourt L, Fitzgerald M, Fowler R, Girard T, Goligher E, Goossens H, Haniffa R, Higgins A, Hills T, Horvat C, Huang D, King A, Lamontagne F, Lawler P, Lewis R, Linstrum K, Litton E, Lorenzi E, Malakouti S, McAuley D, McGlothlin A, Mcguinness S, McVerry B, Montgomery S, Morpeth S, Mouncey P, Orr K, Parke R, Parker J, Patanwala A, Rowan K, Santos M, Saunders C, Seymour C, Shankar-Hari M, Tong S, Turgeon A, Turner A, Van de Veerdonk FL, Zarychanski R, Green C, Berry S, Marshall J, McArthur C, Angus D, Webb Set al., 2021, Lopinavir-ritonavir and hydroxychloroquine for critically ill patients with COVID-19: REMAP-CAP randomized control trial, Intensive Care Medicine, Vol: 47, Pages: 867-886, ISSN: 0342-4642

Purpose: To study the efficacy of lopinavir-ritonavir and hydroxychloroquine in critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) Methods: Critically ill adults with COVID-19 were randomized to receive lopinavir-ritonavir, hydroxychloroquine, combination therapy of lopinavir-ritonavir, and hydroxychloroquine or no antiviral therapy (control). The primary endpoint was an ordinal scale of organ-support free days. Analyses used a Bayesian cumulative logistic model and expressed treatment effects as an adjusted odds ratio (OR) where an OR >1 is favorable. Results: We randomized 694 patients to receive lopinavir-ritonavir (n=255), hydroxychloroquine (n=50), combination therapy (n=27) or control (n=362). The median (IQR) organ support-free days among patients in lopinavir-ritonavir, hydroxychloroquine, and combination therapy groups was 4 (–1 to 15), 0 (–1 to 9) and –1 (–1 to 7), respectively, compared to 6 (–1 to 16) in the control group with in-hospital mortality of 88/249 (35%), 17/49 (35%), 13/26 (50%), respectively, compared to 106/353 (30%) in the control group. The three interventions decreased organ support-free days compared to control (OR [95% credible interval]: 0.73 [0.55, 0.99], 0.57 [0.35, 0.83] 0.41 [0.24, 0.72]), yielding posterior probabilities that reached the threshold futility (≥99.0%), and high probabilities of harm (98.0%, 99.9% and >99.9%, respectively). The three interventions reduced hospital survival compared with control (OR [95% CrI]: 0.65 [0.45, 0.95], 0.56 [0.30, 0.89], and 0.36 [0.17, 0.73]), yielding high probabilities of harm (98.5% and 99.4% and 99.8%, respectively). Conclusion: Among critically ill patients with COVID-19, lopinavir-ritonavir, hydroxychloroquine, or combination therapy worsened outcomes compared to no antiviral therapy.Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02735707

Journal article

Domingo P, Mur I, Mateo GM, Gutierrez MDM, Pomar V, de Benito N, Corbacho N, Herrera S, Millan L, Muñoz J, Malouf J, Molas ME, Asensi V, Horcajada JP, Estrada V, Gutierrez F, Torres F, Perez-Molina JA, Fortun J, Villar LM, Hohenthal U, Marttila H, Vuorinen T, Nordberg M, Valtonen M, Frigault MJ, Mansour MK, Patel NJ, Fernandes A, Harvey L, Foulkes AS, Healy BC, Shah R, Bensaci AM, Woolley AE, Nikiforow S, Lin N, Sagar M, Shrager H, Huckins DS, Axelrod M, Pincus MD, Fleisher J, Lampa J, Nowak P, Vesterbacka JC, Rasmuson J, Skorup P, Janols H, Niward KF, Chatzidionysiou K, Asgeirsson H, Parke Å, Blennow O, Svensson A-K, Aleman S, Sönnerborg A, Henter J-I, Horne AC, Al-Beidh F, Angus D, Annane D, Arabi Y, Beane A, Berry S, Bhimani Z, Bonten M, Bradbury C, Brunkhorst F, Buxton M, Cheng A, Cove M, De Jong M, Derde L, Estcourt L, Goossens H, Gordon A, Green C, Haniffa R, Ichihara N, Lamontagne F, Lawler P, Litton E, Marshall J, McArthur C, McAuley D, McGuinness S, McVerry B, Montgommery S, Mouncey P, Murthy S, Nichol A, Parke R, Parker J, Reyes F, Rowan K, Saito H, Santos M, Seymour C, Shankar-Hari M, Turgeon A, Turner A, van Bentum-Puijk W, van de Veerdonk F, Webb S, Zarychanski R, Baillie JK, Beasley R, Cooper N, Fowler R, Galea J, Hills T, King A, Morpeth S, Netea M, Ogungbenro K, Pettila V, Tong S, Uyeki T, Youngstein T, Higgins A, Lorenzi E, Berry L, Salama C, Rosas IO, Ruiz-Antorán B, Muñez Rubio E, Ramos Martínez A, Campos Esteban J, Avendaño Solá C, Pizov R, Sanz Sanz J, Abad-Santos F, Bautista-Hernández A, García-Fraile L, Barrios A, Gutiérrez Liarte Á, Alonso Pérez T, Rodríguez-García SC, Mejía-Abril G, Prieto JC, Leon R, VEIGA VC, SCHEINBERG P, FARIAS DLC, PRATS JG, CAVALCANTI AB, MACHADO FR, ROSA RG, BERWANGER O, AZEVEDO LCP, LOPES RD, DOURADO LK, CASTRO CG, ZAMPIERI FG, AVEZUM A, LISBOA TC, ROJAS SSO, COELHO JC, LEITE RT, CARVALHO JC, ANDRADE LEC, SANDES AR, PINTÃO MCT, SANTOS SV, ALMEIDA TML, COSTA AN, GEBARA OCE, FREITAS FGR, PACHECO ES, MACHADO DJB, MARTINet al., 2021, Association between administration of IL-6 antagonists and mortality among patients hospitalized for COVID-19, JAMA, ISSN: 0098-7484

Importance Clinical trials assessing the efficacy of IL-6 antagonists in patients hospitalized for COVID-19 have variously reported benefit, no effect, and harm.Objective To estimate the association between administration of IL-6 antagonists compared with usual care or placebo and 28-day all-cause mortality and other outcomes.Data Sources Trials were identified through systematic searches of electronic databases between October 2020 and January 2021. Searches were not restricted by trial status or language. Additional trials were identified through contact with experts.Study Selection Eligible trials randomly assigned patients hospitalized for COVID-19 to a group in whom IL-6 antagonists were administered and to a group in whom neither IL-6 antagonists nor any other immunomodulators except corticosteroids were administered. Among 72 potentially eligible trials, 27 (37.5%) met study selection criteria.Data Extraction and Synthesis In this prospective meta-analysis, risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool. Inconsistency among trial results was assessed using the I2 statistic. The primary analysis was an inverse variance–weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis of odds ratios (ORs) for 28-day all-cause mortality.Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality at 28 days after randomization. There were 9 secondary outcomes including progression to invasive mechanical ventilation or death and risk of secondary infection by 28 days.Results A total of 10 930 patients (median age, 61 years [range of medians, 52-68 years]; 3560 [33%] were women) participating in 27 trials were included. By 28 days, there were 1407 deaths among 6449 patients randomized to IL-6 antagonists and 1158 deaths among 4481 patients randomized to usual care or placebo (summary OR, 0.86 [95% CI, 0.79-0.95]; P = .003 based on a fixed-effects meta-analysis). This corresponds to an absolute mortality risk of 22% for IL

Journal article

Porter A, Youngstein T, Babar S, Mason JCet al., 2021, A rare life-threatening presentation of Takayasu arteritis, RHEUMATOLOGY, Vol: 60, Pages: 6-8, ISSN: 1462-0324

Journal article

Satta G, Youngstein T, Lightstone L, Gilchrist M, COVID-19 treatment guidelines working group at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trustet al., 2021, The utility of a local multidisciplinary working group to oversee the establishment of rapidly evolving standards of care and to support trial recruitment during the COVID-19 pandemic, Clinical medicine (London, England), Vol: 21, Pages: e287-e289, ISSN: 1470-2118

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. The first analyses of cases described high numbers of critically ill patients requiring intensive care admission with significant late inflammatory features. By the time the first cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection were diagnosed in the UK, a wide range of drugs were under consideration and it became clear that the input of clinicians covering all organ systems (in particular, infectious diseases, haematology, rheumatology, renal medicine and intensive care) and of expert specialist pharmacists was necessary at the local level. Thus, an expert multidisciplinary (MDT) group within our organisation was convened to offer a standardised approach and robust clinical governance for the treatment of COVID-19 patients admitted to our hospitals and rapidly develop standards of care as evidence evolved. This commentary explores the methods and mechanisms for creating an MDT COVID-19 treatment working group which are applicable to any hospital likely to admit and care for high numbers of COVID-19 patients and demonstrates how the structure and governance of the group allowed for rapid adoption of both dexamethasone and tocilizumab into standard of care as data became available.

Journal article

Gordon A, Mouncey P, Al-Beidh F, Rowan K, Nichol A, Arabi Y, Annane D, Beane A, van Bentum-Puijk W, Berry L, Bhimani Z, Bonten M, Bradbury C, Brunkhorst F, Buzgau A, Cheng A, Detry M, Duffy E, Estcourt L, Fitzgerald M, Goossens H, Haniffa R, Higgins A, Hills T, Horvat C, Lamontagne F, Lawler P, Leavis H, Linstrum K, Litton E, Lorenzi E, Marshall J, Mayr F, McAuley D, McGlothlin A, McGuinness S, McVerry B, Montgomery S, Morpeth S, Murthy S, Orr K, Parke R, Parker J, Patanwala A, Pettilä V, Rademaker E, Santos M, Saunders C, Seymour C, Shankar-Hari M, Sligl W, Turgeon A, Turner A, van de Veerdonk F, Zarychanski R, Green C, Lewis R, Angus D, McArthur C, Berry S, Webb S, Derde Let al., 2021, Interleukin-6 receptor antagonists in critically Ill patients with Covid-19, New England Journal of Medicine, Vol: 384, Pages: 1491-1502, ISSN: 0028-4793

BACKGROUNDThe efficacy of interleukin-6 receptor antagonists in critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is unclear.METHODSWe evaluated tocilizumab and sarilumab in an ongoing international, multifactorial, adaptive platform trial. Adult patients with Covid-19, within 24 hours after starting organ support in the intensive care unit (ICU), were randomly assigned to receive tocilizumab (8 mg per kilogram of body weight), sarilumab (400 mg), or standard care (control). The primary outcome was respiratory and cardiovascular organ support–free days, on an ordinal scale combining in-hospital death (assigned a value of −1) and days free of organ support to day 21. The trial uses a Bayesian statistical model with predefined criteria for superiority, efficacy, equivalence, or futility. An odds ratio greater than 1 represented improved survival, more organ support–free days, or both.RESULTSBoth tocilizumab and sarilumab met the predefined criteria for efficacy. At that time, 353 patients had been assigned to tocilizumab, 48 to sarilumab, and 402 to control. The median number of organ support–free days was 10 (interquartile range, −1 to 16) in the tocilizumab group, 11 (interquartile range, 0 to 16) in the sarilumab group, and 0 (interquartile range, −1 to 15) in the control group. The median adjusted cumulative odds ratios were 1.64 (95% credible interval, 1.25 to 2.14) for tocilizumab and 1.76 (95% credible interval, 1.17 to 2.91) for sarilumab as compared with control, yielding posterior probabilities of superiority to control of more than 99.9% and of 99.5%, respectively. An analysis of 90-day survival showed improved survival in the pooled interleukin-6 receptor antagonist groups, yielding a hazard ratio for the comparison with the control group of 1.61 (95% credible interval, 1.25 to 2.08) and a posterior probability of superiority of more than 99.9%. All secondary analyses supported efficacy of these interleuki

Journal article

Vergis N, Phillips R, Cornelius V, Katsarou A, Youngstein T, Cook L, Willicombe M, Pilay C, Shturova T, Almonte M, Charania A, Turner R, Kon OM, Cooke G, Thursz M, Cherlin S, Wason J, Milojkovic D, Innes AJ, Cooper Net al., 2021, Multi-arm Trial of Inflammatory Signal Inhibitors (MATIS) for hospitalised patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 pneumonia: a structured summary of a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial, Trials, Vol: 22, ISSN: 1745-6215

OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of MATIS is to determine the efficacy of ruxolitinib (RUX) or fostamatinib (FOS) compared to standard of care (SOC) with respect to reducing the proportion of hospitalised patients progressing from mild or moderate to severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Secondary objectives, at 14 and 28 days, are to: Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce mortality Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the need for invasive ventilation or ECMO Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the need for non-invasive ventilation Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the proportion of participants suffering significant oxygen desaturation Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce the need for renal replacement therapy Determine the efficacy of RUX and FOS to reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism Determine the efficacy of RUX and FOS to reduce the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia [graded by a 9-point modified WHO Ordinal Scale* Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce systemic inflammation Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to the incidence of renal impairment Determine the efficacy of RUX or FOS to reduce duration of hospital stay Evaluate the safety of RUX and FOS for treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia. TRIAL DESIGN: A multi-arm, multi-stage (3-arm parallel-group, 2-stage) randomised controlled trial that allocates participants 1:1:1 and tests for superiority in experimental arms versus standard of care. PARTICIPANTS: Patients will be recruited while inpatients during hospitalisation for COVID-19 in multiple centres throughout the UK including Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. INCLUSION: Patients age ≥ 18 years at screening Patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 pneumonia, defined as Grade 3 or 4 severity by the WHO COVID-19 Ordinal Scale Patients meeting criteria: Hospitalization AND SARS-CoV2 infection (clinically suspected or laboratory confirmed) AND Radiological change consistent with COVID-19 disease C

Journal article

Rosas IO, Brau N, Waters M, Go RC, Hunter BD, Bhagani S, Skiest D, Aziz MS, Cooper N, Douglas IS, Savic S, Youngstein T, Del Sorbo L, Gracian AC, De la Zerda DJ, Ustianowski A, Bao M, Dimonaco S, Graham E, Matharu B, Spotswood H, Tsai L, Malhotra Aet al., 2021, Tocilizumab in Hospitalized Patients with Severe Covid-19 Pneumonia, NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, Vol: 384, Pages: 1503-1516, ISSN: 0028-4793

Journal article

Sivalokanathan S, Foley M, Cole G, Youngstein Tet al., 2021, Gastroenteritis and cardiogenic shock in a healthcare worker: a case report of COVID-19 myocarditis confirmed with serology, EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL-CASE REPORTS, Vol: 5

Journal article

Uy CP, Tarkin JM, Gopalan D, Barwick TD, Tombetti E, Youngstein T, Mason JCet al., 2021, The impact of integrated non-invasive imaging in the management of takayasu arteritis, JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Vol: 14, Pages: 495-500, ISSN: 1876-7591

Journal article

Papa R, Lane T, Minden K, Touitou I, Cantarini L, Cattalini M, Obici L, Jansson AF, Belot A, Frenkel J, Anton J, Wolska-Kusnierz B, Berendes R, Remesal A, Remesal A, Jelusic M, Hoppenreijs E, Espada G, Nikishina I, Maggio MC, Bovis F, Masini M, Youngstein T, Rezk T, Papadopoulou C, Brogan PA, Hawkins PN, Woo P, Ruperto N, Gattorno M, Lachmann HJet al., 2021, INSAID Variant Classification and Eurofever Criteria Guide Optimal Treatment Strategy in Patients with TRAPS: Data from the Eurofever Registry, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY-IN PRACTICE, Vol: 9, Pages: 783-+, ISSN: 2213-2198

Journal article

Dixon L, Coughlan C, Karunaratne K, Gorgoraptis N, Varley J, Husselbee J, Mallon D, Carroll R, Jones B, Boynton C, Pritchard J, Youngstein T, Mason J, Gabriel Cet al., 2021, Immunosuppression for intracranial vasculitis associated with SARS-CoV-2: therapeutic implications for COVID-19 cerebrovascular pathology, JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY NEUROSURGERY AND PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 92, Pages: 103-+, ISSN: 0022-3050

Journal article

Amigues I, Pearlman AH, Patel A, Reid P, Robinson PC, Sinha R, Kim AHJ, Youngstein T, Jayatilleke A, Konig Met al., 2020, Coronavirus disease 2019: investigational therapies in the prevention and treatment of hyperinflammation, EXPERT REVIEW OF CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 16, Pages: 1185-1204, ISSN: 1744-666X

Journal article

Papa R, Lane T, Bovis F, Minden K, Touitou I, Cantarini L, Cattalini M, Obici L, Jansson A, Belot A, Woska-Kusnierz B, Berendes R, Remesal A, Jelusic M, Espada G, Nikishina I, Hoppenreijs E, Maggio MC, Youngstein T, Rezk T, Papadopoulou C, Brogan P, Hawkins PN, Woo P, Ruperto N, Gattorno M, Lachmann HJet al., 2020, LONG-TERM OUTCOMES AND TREATMENT EFFICACY IN PATIENTS WITH TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED AUTOINFLAMMATORY SYNDROME (TRAPS) FROM THE EUROFEVER INTERNATIONAL REGISTRY, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: 821-822, ISSN: 0003-4967

Conference paper

El-Ghazali S, Wilson-Morkeh H, Porter A, Thapa S, Mason J, Fontana M, Singh A, Cole G, Youngstein Tet al., 2020, CARDIAC MRI IN HYPERFERRITINAEMIC DISEASE STATES REVEALS MYOCARDIAL INFLAMMATION NOT IDENTIFIED BY ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: 1800-1800, ISSN: 0003-4967

Conference paper

Price E, MacPhie E, Kay L, Lanyon P, Griffiths B, Holroyd C, Abhishek A, Youngstein T, Bailey K, Clinch J, Shaikh M, Rivett Aet al., 2020, Identifying rheumatic disease patients at high risk and requiring shielding during the COVID-19 pandemic, CLINICAL MEDICINE, Vol: 20, Pages: 256-261, ISSN: 1470-2118

Journal article

Porter A, Youngstein T, Tombetti E, Mason Jet al., 2020, Biologic therapy in supra-aortic Takayasu arteritis can improve symptoms of cerebral ischaemia without surgical intervention, Rheumatology, Vol: 59, Pages: iii28-iii32, ISSN: 0080-2727

Background: Takayasu arteritis typically results in severe arterial injury with stenoses, occlusions and occasionally aneurysms. Involvement of the supra-aortic arteries is common, and in its most severe form may compromise cerebral blood supply, resulting in signs of cerebral ischaemia including visual impairment, dysphasia, hemiparesis, loss of consciousness and stroke. In addition to combination immunosuppression, the management paradigm for symptomatic cerebral ischaemia includes revascularisation. The invasive nature of this surgery, the risk of complications and the relatively high rate of re-stenosis is of concern to patients and physicians alike.The aim of this study was to determine whether combined immunosuppression with early escalation to biologic therapy improved outcomes and reduced the need for high risk surgical intervention Methods: A retrospective review of 145 Takayasu arteritis patients attending Imperial College Healthcare between 2010-2018 was conducted to identify those with cerebral ischaemia secondary to supra-aortic disease and to analyse their treatment and outcomes. Results: Eight patients (5.5%) were identified. Seven received long-term combined immunosuppressive therapy and six were prescribed biologics. The data revealed a higher than expected comprehensive response to therapy, with significant falls in disease activity, cerebral ischaemia score and prednisolone dose required, over a median follow-up of 37 months. Serial imaging analysis detected no arterial disease progression after the initiation of optimal therapy. Only one patient required surgical intervention for persistent neurological symptoms. Conclusion: Early use of biologic therapy in those with supra-aortic Takayasu arteritis presenting with cerebral ischaemia may reduce the numbers of patients requiring surgical intervention and improve outcomes.

Journal article

Wilson-Morkeh H, Youngstein T, Shabbir S, Bakshi J, Pihlajavaara T, Bellamy M, Cairns Tet al., 2020, TWO PATHOLOGIES ONE HEART: LIFE-THREATENING LUPUS MYOCARDITIS IN A PATIENT WITH PRE-EXISTING DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY, Annual Conference of the British-Society-for-Rheumatology (BSR), Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, Pages: 38-38, ISSN: 1462-0324

Conference paper

Mackenzie S, Low R, Brown M, Sanchez E, Gilmour K, Youngstein T, Tatersall R, Carpenter B, Patel A, Mcnamara C, Manson Jet al., 2020, MULTI-CENTRE CROSS-SPECIALTY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF SUSPECTED ADULT ONSET SECONDARY HAEMOPHAGOCYTIC LYMPHOHISTIOCYTOSIS (HLH), Annual Conference of the British-Society-for-Rheumatology (BSR), Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, ISSN: 1462-0324

Conference paper

Dahanayake C, Maughan R, Youngstein T, Mason JCet al., 2020, ASSESSING THE SAFETY OF TREATMENT CESSATION IN TAKAYASU ARTERITIS, Annual Conference of the British-Society-for-Rheumatology (BSR), Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, ISSN: 1462-0324

Conference paper

Rowczenio DM, Youngstein T, Trojer H, Omoyinmi E, Baginska A, Brogan P, Papadopoulou C, Rezk T, Hawkins PN, Lachmann HJet al., 2020, British kindred with dominant FMF associated with high incidence of AA amyloidosis caused by novel MEFV variant, and a review of the literature, RHEUMATOLOGY, Vol: 59, Pages: 554-558, ISSN: 1462-0324

Journal article

Uy C, Iqbal M, Thapa S, Youngstein Tet al., 2020, Adherence to new Royal College of Ophthalmology guidance for hydroxychloroquine retinal screening in rheumatology patients., Clin Med (Lond), Vol: 20, Pages: s93-s94

Journal article

Wilson-Morkeh H, Al-Abdulla A, Sien L, Mohamed H, Youngstein Tet al., 2020, Important drug interactions exist between cannabidiol oil and commonly prescribed drugs in rheumatology practice, RHEUMATOLOGY, Vol: 59, Pages: 249-251, ISSN: 1462-0324

Journal article

Rezk T, Lachmann HJ, Fontana M, Naharro AM, Sachchithanantham S, Mahmood S, Petrie A, Whelan CJ, Pinney JH, Foard D, Lane T, Youngstein T, Wechalekar AD, Hawkins PN, Gillmore JDet al., 2019, Cardiorenal AL amyloidosis: risk stratification and outcomes based upon cardiac and renal biomarkers, BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Vol: 186, Pages: 460-470, ISSN: 0007-1048

Journal article

Sousa Fernandes C, Baldeiras I, Guerreiro R, Ribeiro JA, Cunha R, Youngstein T, Nanthapisal S, Leitao MJ, Caramelo F, Bras J, Santo Get al., 2019, Plasma adenosine deaminase 2 and serum immunoglobulin M accuracy in adult Sneddon's syndrome, 5th Congress of the European-Academy-of-Neurology (EAN), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 286-286, ISSN: 1351-5101

Conference paper

Rezk T, Davenport A, Gan JJ, Lachmann HJ, Fontana M, Martinez-Naharro A, Sachchithanantham S, Guillotte C, Mahmood S, Petrie A, Whelan CJ, Pinney JH, Foard D, Lane T, Youngstein T, Wechalekar AD, Hawkins PN, Gillmore JDet al., 2019, Bioimpedance vector analysis for the detection of extracellular volume overload and sarcopenia in systemic AL amyloidosis, BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Vol: 185, Pages: 977-980, ISSN: 0007-1048

Journal article

Shabbir S, Al-Abdulla A, Kinderlerer A, Sohal M, Layton M, Hill P, Corbett R, Lightstone L, Cairns T, Mason J, Cooper N, Youngstein Tet al., 2019, OFF-LICENCE USE OF ANAKINRA IN CRITICALLY ILL ADULTS WITH SUSPECTED HAEMOPHAGOCYTOSIS - A SINGLE CENTRE EXPERIENCE, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: 292-293, ISSN: 0003-4967

Conference paper

Papa R, Lane T, Youngstein T, Rezk T, Papadopoulou C, Ruperto N, Brogan P, Hawkins PN, Woo P, Gattorno M, Lachmann HJet al., 2019, LONG-TERM OUTCOMES AND TREATMENT EFFICACY IN PATIENTS WITH TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED AUTOINFLAMMATORY SYNDROME (TRAPS): A SERIES OF 290 CASES FROM THE EUROFEVER/EUROTRAPS INTERNATIONAL REGISTRY, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: 962-963, ISSN: 0003-4967

Conference paper

Hutchinson M, Sohal M, Layton M, Sriskandan S, Brett S, Hill P, Youngstein TABet al., 2019, STEROID-FREE MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING HAEMOPHAGOCYTIC LYMPHOHISTIOCYTOSIS IN THE CONTEXT OF SUSPECTED LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASE AND INFECTION, Annual Conference of the British-Soceity-for-Rheumatology, Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, ISSN: 1462-0324

Conference paper

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