Imperial College London

ProfessorChristosMarkides

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Chemical Engineering

Professor of Clean Energy Technologies
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1601c.markides Website

 
 
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Location

 

404ACE ExtensionSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@inproceedings{Chatzopoulou:2017,
author = {Chatzopoulou, MA and Markides, CN},
publisher = {ECOS},
title = {Advancements in organic Rankine cycle system optimisation for combined heat and power applications: components sizing and thermoeconomic considerations},
url = {http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/54321},
year = {2017}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - CPAPER
AB - There is great interest in distributed combined heat and power (CHP) generation in the built environment due to the higher overall efficienciesattained in comparison to separate provision of these vectors. Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems are capable of generating additional electricity from the thermal outputs of CHP engines, improving the electrical conversion efficiency and power-to-heat ratio of suchsystems. Thermodynamic analysis and technical feasibility are at the core of the development of these systems, whilea critical factor for the wider adoption of ORC systems concerns their economic proposition. Obtainingcredible estimates of system costs requires correct sizing of individual components. This work focuses on the thermodynamic optimisation, sizing and costing of ORC units in CHP applications, over a range of heat-source temperatures. The working fluids examined include R245fa, R1233zd, Pentane and Hexane, due to their good performance and favourable environmental characteristics. The optimalcycles obtained can increase the power-to-heat ratio of the complete CHP-ORCsystem by up to 65%.Alternative equipment sizing methods are then applied for each fluid and the resultant component sizes are compared. The cost estimates obtained from the alternative methods are also compared to real ORC application. Based on this, a hybrid costing method is proposed andapplied to an ORC system design,in order to obtain the specific investment cost (SIC). The results indicate that as the heat source temperature increases, the power output increases, resultingin larger and more expensive components. Nevertheless, the SIC drops from 17GBP/W for low-power outputs to 1.1GBP/W for high-temperature/high-power outputs.
AU - Chatzopoulou,MA
AU - Markides,CN
PB - ECOS
PY - 2017///
TI - Advancements in organic Rankine cycle system optimisation for combined heat and power applications: components sizing and thermoeconomic considerations
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/54321
ER -