Tuberculosis Screening

The research aims of this theme include:

  • To assess feasibility and effectiveness of latent TB infection (LTBI) screening in primary care
  • To evaluate active case finding interventions amongst socially marginalised risk groups outside London
  • To define interventions to improve participation in LTBI screening
  • To model the population impact and cost-effectiveness of new-entrant LTBI screening
  • To assess the feasibility, safety and acceptability of LTBI treatment in primary care
  • With TB Alert, assess reasons for low uptake of screening programs and identify potential interventions

2 column general content block - TB screening PI's

Professor Ajit Lalvani


Ajit Lalvani is Head of Respiratory Infection and Director of the TB Research Centre at IC. He invented and validated the new standard-of-care for latent TB diagnosis which transformed TB control and prevention nationally and internationally. His more recent work dissected the epidemiology of TB in the UK, systematically assessed and critiqued existing policy and practice for new-entrant TB screening and developed a new cost-effective strategy to identify >90% of imported latent TB.

Dr Dominik Zenner


Dominik Zenner is Consultant Epidemiologist and head of TB screening in CIDSC Colindale, Public Health England. Leading on national LTBI initiatives and pre-entry TB case finding. Successfully implemented previous local LTBI screening pilot. Qualified medically-clinically and in public health.


Tuberculosis Diagnostics

The research goals of this theme include:

  • Investigating cost effective, rapid, sensitive and specific diagnostic toolkit and algorithms for active TB
  • Improved prognostic evaluation of LTBI for progression to active TB, enabling more efficient risk stratification and cost effective targeting of treatment
  • Developing rapid tests for detecting multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB)

2 column general content block - TB diagnostics PI's

Professor Ajit Lalvani


Professor Lalvani invented the paradigm of T cell-based diagnosis (ELISpot-IGRA), the NICE-approved standard-of-care for LTBI which has transformed diagnosis and screening in the UK and internationally. His work has substantially enhanced routine NHS clinical practice and shaped TB control policy globally.

Professor Grace Smith


Professor Grace Smith; Clinical lead for PHE, (HPA) Mycobacterial Reference Service for the Midlands since 1995, oversees a very active clinical practice in acute bacteriology and primary and reference mycobacteriology in a high incidence area. She is the Clinical Director for Infectious Diseases and Sexual health in Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, and chairs the multidisciplinary Clinical Group for the Birmingham and Solihull TB Control Programme. She has led the introduction of MIRU VNTR typing into regular clinical service.


Tuberculosis Surveillance and Management

The over-arching aim of this theme is to asses the utility and cost-effectiveness of WGS combined with epidemiological data to improve TB surveillance and control and assessment of WGS for rapid identification of drug-resistance.

2 column general content block - TB surveillance and management PI's

Dr Grace Smith


Dr Grace Smith; Clinical lead for PHE, (HPA) Mycobacterial Reference Service for the Midlands since 1995, oversees a very active clinical practice in acute bacteriology and primary and reference mycobacteriology in a high incidence area. She is the Clinical Director for Infectious Diseases and Sexual health in Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, and chairs the multidisciplinary Clinical Group for the Birmingham and Solihull TB Control Programme. She has led the introduction of MIRU VNTR typing into regular clinical service.

Professor Derrick Crook


Professor Derrick Crook, University of Oxford, leads the Modernising Medical Microbiology (MMM) Consortium working jointly with PHE (Grace Smith) on translation of whole genome sequencing (WGS) of pathogens for outbreak detection, surveillance and characterisation of pathogens as a replacement of current routine methods. The group is making substantial progress in rapidly predicting anti-mycobacterial resistance of strains and reliably identifying transmission clusters.