Imperial College London

Summit promotes affordable innovation to meet global health demands

by

David Cameron

Medical researchers, politicians and decision makers gather in London today to champion innovative solutions to the world's major health problems.

The Global Health Policy Summit, the first event of its kind, is the result of a partnership between Imperial College London and the Qatar Foundation for education, science and community development.

Held at the Guildhall, the Summit will tackle maternal health, primary care, non-infectious diseases and ageing societies. It will also examine how health workers and their patients can get the best out of health care systems and explore the potential of using digital and social media.

The event is hosted by Professor The Lord Darzi of Denham, Director of the Institute of Global Health Innovation at Imperial, and Lord Green, Minister of State for Trade and Investment. Speakers include Earl Howe, Minister of State, Department of Health,  Prime Minister David Cameron, Her Highness Sheikha Moza of Qatar, as well as health ministers from across the globe, and leading health innovators from academia and industry.

“This Summit comes at a pivotal moment for global health,” says Lord Darzi. “Much of the world still has limited access to basic medical facilities and, even in wealthier nations, access to new medicines and healthcare technology is increasingly unaffordable.”

“There is a long tradition of tackling ill-health through innovation. It has the potential to improve health for millions of people round the world but only if it is affordable.

“This summit aims to create a sea-change in the way we tackle global health problems to enable the funding, development and promotion of frugal technology.”

Next year’s Global Health Policy Summit will be held in Doha, Qatar.

Reporter

Kerry Noble

Kerry Noble
Department of Surgery & Cancer

Click to expand or contract

Contact details

Email: k.noble@imperial.ac.uk

Show all stories by this author

Tags:

Global-health
See more tags

Leave a comment

Your comment may be published, displaying your name as you provide it, unless you request otherwise. Your contact details will never be published.