Citation

BibTex format

@article{Bouras:2016:10.1016/j.ejso.2016.10.010,
author = {Bouras, G and Markar, SR and Burns, EM and Huddy, JR and Bottle, A and Athanasiou, T and Darzi, A and Hanna, GB},
doi = {10.1016/j.ejso.2016.10.010},
journal = {European Journal of Surgical Oncology},
pages = {454--460},
title = {The psychological impact of symptoms related to esophagogastric cancer resection presenting in primary care: A national linked database study},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejso.2016.10.010},
volume = {43},
year = {2016}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - BackgroundThe objective was to evaluate incidence, risk factors and impact of postoperative symptoms following esophagogastric cancer resection in primary care.MethodsPatients undergoing esophagogastrectomy for cancer from 1998 to 2010 with linked records in Clinical Practice Research Datalink, Hospital Episodes Statistics and Office of National Statistics databases were studied. The recording of codes for reflux, dysphagia, dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, dumping, diarrhea, steatorrhea, appetite loss, weight loss, pain and fatigue were identified up to 12 months postoperatively. Psychiatric morbidity was also examined and its risk evaluated by logistic regression analysis.ResultsOverall, 58.6% (1029/1755) of patients were alive 2 years after surgery. Of these, 41.1% had recorded postoperative symptoms. Reflux, dysphagia, dyspepsia and pain were more frequent following esophagectomy compared with gastrectomy (p < 0.05). Complications (OR = 1.40 95%CI 1.00–1.95) and surgical procedure predicted postoperative symptoms (p < 0.05). When compared with partial gastrectomy, esophagectomy (OR = 2.03 95%CI 1.26–3.27), total gastrectomy (OR = 2.44 95%CI 1.57–3.79) and esophagogastrectomy (OR = 2.66 95%CI 1.85–2.86) were associated with postoperative symptoms (p < 0.05). The majority of patients with postoperative psychiatric morbidity had depression or anxiety (98%). Predictors of postoperative depression/anxiety included younger age (OR = 0.97 95%CI 0.96–0.99), complications (OR = 2.40 95%CI 1.51–3.83), psychiatric history (OR = 6.73 95%CI 4.25–10.64) and postoperative symptoms (OR = 1.78 95%CI 1.17–2.71).ConclusionsOver 40% of patients had symptoms related to esophagogastric cancer resection recorded in primary care, and were associated with an increase in postoperative depression and anxiety.
AU - Bouras,G
AU - Markar,SR
AU - Burns,EM
AU - Huddy,JR
AU - Bottle,A
AU - Athanasiou,T
AU - Darzi,A
AU - Hanna,GB
DO - 10.1016/j.ejso.2016.10.010
EP - 460
PY - 2016///
SN - 1532-2157
SP - 454
TI - The psychological impact of symptoms related to esophagogastric cancer resection presenting in primary care: A national linked database study
T2 - European Journal of Surgical Oncology
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejso.2016.10.010
UR - http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000394072300030&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=1ba7043ffcc86c417c072aa74d649202
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/45342
VL - 43
ER -