Imperial College London

Podcast: A case of the plague, innovating China and diamond solar cells

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In this edition: new insights from an old disease, how China is getting ahead in innovations, and using diamonds to improve solar cell efficiency.

The podcast is presented by Gareth Mitchell, a lecturer on Imperial's Science Communication MSc course and the presenter of Click Radio on the BBC World Service, with contributions from our roaming reporters.

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News: Philandering sparrows and materials made from tea – New research shows that male sparrows can tell is their wife is prone to infidelity, providing less food as a result, and a bacteria found in tea has been coaxed into fabricating new materials that could take us to Mars.

A case of the plague – Modern analysis of an unusual plague outbreak that occurred in Derbyshire 350 years ago could shed new light on contemporary disease outbreaks, such as Ebola.

Diamond solar cells – The next generation of solar cells need new materials to bring greater efficiency, and one Imperial researcher has been investigating using a type of diamond for the job.

Innovating China – In his new book, the Business School’s Professor George Yip explains how China is becoming more innovative, thanks to their flexibility in meeting customer needs, and a trial and error approach to development.

Reporters

Hayley Dunning

Hayley Dunning
Communications Division

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Contact details

Tel: +44 (0)20 7594 2412
Email: h.dunning@imperial.ac.uk

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Gareth Mitchell

Gareth Mitchell
Centre for Languages, Culture and Communication

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Contact details

Tel: +44 (0)20 7594 8766
Email: g.mitchell@imperial.ac.uk

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Tags:

Infectious-diseases, Research, Strategy-share-the-wonder, Podcast, Energy
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