We offer a wide range of courses for research staff, including postdocs and fellows, to help you to make the most of your current post and successfully plan your next steps. 

To see upcoming courses and workshops and book your place, visit our online calendar

Below are details of all the courses we offer throughout the year.  

Course listing

Consultancy: How it Can Enhance Your Academic Career

  • Tutor: Rebecca Andrew - Imperial Consultants (ICON)
  • Usually scheduled: November, May
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Who should attend

This course, run by staff from Imperial Consultants, is for any postdoc interested in applying their knowledge to problems in industry, commerce and government. The course will introduce you to the world of academic consultancy, from acting as an expert witness to providing specialist advice. It will also introduce you to the support Imperial Consultants, a College-owned company, can offer you when consulting.

Key areas

  • What is consultancy? How can it enhance an academic career?
  • The consultancy project life cycle including case studies
  • Introducing ICON and how can we help
  • How to get started with consultancy
  • How you can promote yourself and develop your skills

What have past participants found most useful?

"I became aware of some skills that I have and might be marketable. I thought about my own contacts with industry and how to use them."

"The course was very informative about Imperial Consultants, how it works and what the benefits are for Imperial researchers when working with them."

"The breadth of useful advice and the absence of painful/embarrassing exercises" - Postdoc, Business School

"I really enjoyed every single aspect of the course. It’s very interactive, lots of interesting/unique exercises. The trainer was fantastic!" - Postdoc, Life Sciences

How Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Can Impact your Research

  • Tutor: Dr Amritha Nair & Dr Prashanthini Jeyarajan - Industry Partnerships and Commercialisation, Imperial College London
  • Usually scheduled: March, July
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Lack of awareness of intellectual property (IP) can result in UK researchers missing out. Many are not commercialising their own ideas and some are failing to prevent others from unfairly exploiting their research. This course brings in experts from Imperial Innovations to help to plug this knowledge gap. It enables postdocs to work out what type of intellectual property rights they need to protect their work and how to take the necessary steps to get it.

Key areas

  • Patents - what, why, who, where, how?
  • Copyright
  • Commercialisation of inventions
  • Licensing and spin-out companies
  • Dealing with companies—bridging the academia-industry divide

What have past participants found most useful?

"Going through examples and very clear definitions of vocabulary"

"The power of patenting for commercialisation"

"How to source and more completely interpret they aspects of a patent"

"Trainer is knowledgeable and enthusiastic"

How to Engage an Audience and Build Confidence

  • Tutor: Stewart Theobald - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: December
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Would you like to engage and hold an audience attention? Would you like to feel confident in front of an audience? This is an interactive and flexible workshop, with plenty of opportunity to practise and ask questions. The workshop will focus on the techniques used by actors to overcome nerves and perform at their best. We will explore and practise techniques in the following key areas.

Key Areas

  • Overcoming nerves
  • Assessing an audience and flexing our style
  • Gaining authority and credibility
  • Handling questions with confidence

How to Peer Review Research Papers

  • Tutor: Dr David T Jones - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: January, June
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

The ability to review papers should be a core skill of every research scientist. With the growing number of manuscripts being submitted to scientific journals, editors are increasingly reliant on independent experts who can deliver good-quality reviews in a timely fashion.

This course is designed for postdocs and researchers at the early stage of their career who have little or no experience of peer-reviewing.

Key areas

  • How the peer-review process works from submission to publication
  • Recent developments such as “open” peer-review
  • The reviewer’s obligations
  • The criteria against which scientific papers should be evaluated
  • The requirement for objective, specific, constructive and balanced comments that will assist both the editor and the author(s)
  • The amount of time involved in reviewing a paper

What have past participants found most useful?

"How to break up the peer review process and limit it. Receiving a template for reviewing, nobody teaches this!"

"The session really helped me organise the reviews and familiarise myself with the whole process. It also helps me write good papers."

"Dr David T Jones is a perfect presenter and speaker; it was an excellent, engaging, practical session."

 

Innovation and Industry: Effective Project Implementation

  • Tutor: Caroline Broad - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: February
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Are you working on projects in collaboration with industry? Would you like to improve your creative thinking skills and the tools to manage the projects they create?

This workshop is for you if you are looking to develop your understanding of the priorities of industry when working in a collaboration with academia, if you are looking for a move into industry (including not for profit) or you want to improve your basic project management skills. The aim is to develop project management skills in the context of industry academia collaborations (IAC).

In this workshop we explore a formal project development process from idea inception through to project implementation.  You will practice project management tools and techniques and discuss cognitive and behavioural skills needed to implement them. We will discuss current UK industry, government (BIS) and research council expectations of IAC and the existing funding opportunities. The skills learned will support your effective interactions and well-managed projects with industry.

Key areas

  • Industry expectations of academia in collaborations
  • An introduction to creative thinking and problem solving
  • Effective project planning and implementation – team, task, individual
  • Core project management tools

What have past participants found most useful?

"I liked the way the trainer made you think deeply about a few of the topics (Postdoc, Materials)"

"Combination of innovation, project management, people - great focus! (Postdoc, Public Health)"

"The application of business theory to academic research (Postdoc, Health, Social Care and Education)"

Interviewing for Lectureships

  • Tutor: Dr Liz Elvidge, Head of Postdoc and Fellows Development, Imperial College London
  • Usually scheduled: February
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Who should attend

One of the keys to success in securing a lectureship position is preparation for your interview in order to make the most of that opportunity and feel confident of success. You will discover how to be knowledgeable and confident in your interview without relying on tricks or manipulative techniques. This workshop aims to take candidates from average to outstanding by maximising their ability to answer lectureship interview questions. This session includes mock interviews and a Q&A.

Key areas

  • Discover what panels are looking for in lectureship interviews
  • Learn how to answer lectureship questions confidently and successfully
  • Understand the mindset both the interviewers and interviewees have and how this holds the key to unlocking interview success
  • Practice predicting interview questions with accuracy

Further information: Priority for this course will be given to fellows.

Interviews for Jobs Outside Academia

  • Tutor: Dr Madelaine Chapman, Careers Service
  • Usually scheduled: November, May
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Interviews outside academia are often quite different to academic job interviews. In this session, you will learn what to expect and how to prepare for these types of interview. Whatever job you are applying for, this session will give you the tools to prepare well and go into the interview confidently to perform at your best.

Introduction to great design

  • Tutor: Lucy and Peter Moore Fuller, infohackit
  • Usually scheduled: February
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Great design enhances written and visual communication, making it more coherent, effective and accessible. 

The foundations of great design are balanced composition, consistent and meaningful typography, appropriate and engaging colour and imagery - and good planning. You don't need to be 'artistic' or an expert to utilise these concepts; we believe that with a little knowledge and practice, everyone has the potential to improve their design skill. 

In this lively session we examine:

  • Key principles of design - we look at core concepts of composition, typography, colour and images, and how these apply to print and digital formats; understanding these fundamentals is valuable to all visual communication projects, from PowerPoint presentations to diagrams to infographics
  • infohackit hacks for creating a poster - we share our top tips and simple steps you can follow when developing a new design or improving an existing one
  • Planning exercise - preparation is essential for great design; we undertake an exercise to learn how by developing a plan for a visual abstract; you will need a research paper to use as source material (it doesn't have to be your own as this is an exercise only, but you do need to be familiar with the content)

Attendees will receive a summary document to remind you of the key lessons so you can apply them to your future design projects.

Delivered by infohackit: infohackit provide training in design and visual communication, targeted to the needs of PhD students and researchers. Peter and Lucy have had 20-year careers in information design, working with clients in research, Higher Education and health care. They founded infohackit in 2015 and have since trained hundreds of researchers to improve their visual communications, through in-person and online events: infohackit.com

Lectureship Applications: What you Need to Know to be Successful

  • Tutor: Dr Karen Hinxman - Imperial College London
  • Usually scheduled: November, April
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Who should attend

This course will introduce you to the lectureship application process.  A recently successful lecturer will share their experiences of the application and interview process and a senior academic will talk about the process that is undertaken to recruit a new lecturer in a question and answer session.

You will gain an understanding of the different requirements for lectureship applications, including hints and tips as to what to include in both your research and teaching statements. The course will also cover how you can highlight your evidence of esteem and ideas on how to gain further teaching experience. In the afternoon you will have an opportunity to write an application and take part in a practical exercise providing insight into the review processes.

Key areas

  • Factors that contribute to successful applications
  • What to include in your research and teaching statement
  • Drafting an application
  • Gaining experience of reviewing lectureship applications
  • Further Information: Priority for this course will be given to fellows.

Lectureship CVs: What You Need to be Working Towards Now to Succeed in 5 Years

  • Tutor: Dr Karen Hinxman - Imperial College London
  • Usually scheduled: January
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

This course is designed to provide postdocs with useful information to help them prepare for the next stage of an academic career. Is a lectureship the right thing for you? Are there other options? Most importantly, can you make your academic career ambitions a reality? If you want to explore the answers to these questions, then this is the course for you. 

Key Areas

  • Identifying your strengths and weaknesses for career promotion
  • The importance of networking and how to do it
  • How to maximise the potential of your CV
  • Obtaining fellowships and grants
  • What to do once you actually have a lectureship

Further information: Priority for this course will be given to fellows.

Making the Most of your Postdoc

  • Tutor: Dr Karen Hinxman - Imperial College London and Dr Emma Williams - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: May
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

This course is designed to equip you with the skills and resources you need to achieve success as a postdoc and launch your career as a researcher. It is a three-day online course for postdocs in their first two years.

In a structured and supportive environment facilitated by experienced trainers, you will gain a thorough understanding of your career options and develop tools and techniques to help you set and reach a series of short, medium, and long-term goals to maximise your success as a postdoc and plan for your next step.

Key areas

  • Examine what makes a successful postdoc
  • Develop strategies to move toward research independence
  • Learn techniques for working successfully with your PI
  • Research your career options
  • Build a toolkit to plan your career
  • Set clear and robust goals to ensure success for you and your work

Meeting Management

  • Tutor: Caroline Broad - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: December
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Meetings are so often unproductive, with unclear objectives.  In this interactive workshop, you will develop a more effective approach to meetings.

Key Areas

We will explore best practice on how to:

  • Not have meetings!
  • Develop buy-in of key meeting stakeholders
  • Create positive communication pre and post-meeting
  • Facilitate the engagement of all attendees

We will develop your key skills in:

  • Meeting facilitation
  • Decision making
  • Listening
  • Questioning

One to One Voice Coaching Sessions

  • Tutor: Stewart Theobald - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: November, January, March, July
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Would you like to learn exercises that will reduce vocal strain, improve vocal range, variety, clarity and pronunciation and gain and hold the attention of an audience? Would you like to make a positive initial impact and keep control of difficult situations? In this individualised and confidential one-hour session you will determine the objectives and work on exercises to address your specific needs.

Key areas

  • Discover how relaxation, breathing and vocal exercises can improve vocal range and clarity
  • Practice techniques to improve vocal range and clarity
  • Develop a confident voice when speaking to groups and individuals
  • Participants are asked to bring along a presentation to work with and have a clear idea of what you would like to achieve during the session.  

What have past participants found most useful?

"It was great to be able to discuss the particular issues I have with a personal trainer. The video analysis was also very useful."

"The in-depth personal exploration of my speaking style"

"The personalized help. Priceless!"

Personal Pitching: Selling Your Research and Expertise

  • Tutor: Dr Emma Williams - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: February
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

It’s not good enough to be good – people need to know about it!

Using your research as a starting point, we will hone a series of short pitches (oral, written, virtual communication methods) with the aim of getting people to the stage of wanting to know more about you. This half day course will also look at networking tips to allow for pitches to happen. There will be practice and peer feedback. Participants will set up a communication (personal marketing) plan and actions to be undertaken whilst thinking of the “brand” they want to portray. Challenges will be personal but may include creating/updating academic social media, websites, blogs or outreach activities.

Key areas

  • To understand that getting your message out there is essential to career progression
  • To recognise that every time you communicate is an opportunity
  • To craft short pitches
  • To develop a personal communication plan 

Planning a Career Change

  • Tutor: Dr Madelaine Chapman, Careers Service
  • Usually scheduled: February, June
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Are you interested in moving out of academia and into a different career? In this course, you will learn how to approach a career change in a positive way.

This includes how to research your options, network, and approach making decisions.

The course will cover some of the typical careers that postdocs move into and give information on how to work out what would suit you best.

Planning for Success Beyond Your Postdoc

  • Tutor: Dr Karen Hinxman - Imperial College London and Dr Emma Williams - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: June
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Planning for success beyond your postdoc is designed to help experienced postdocs (usually with two to four years of postdoc experience) to take their next career step, academic or otherwise.

During the course, you will be encouraged to explore your career options and develop an action plan to achieve the next step whilst enhancing your job application and interview skills.

Key areas

  • Reflect on the career choices you have made to date
  • Review the skills and expertise you have acquired as a postdoc and identify gaps
  • Develop strategies to move towards research independence
  • Set clear and robust goals to achieve career progression
  • Build a toolkit to search for jobs
  • Prepare your CV for academic and non-academic jobs
  • Construct an effective job application
  • Refine your interview skills

Further Information: Please note that attendance is mandatory on both days of this two-day course.

Preparing Successful Fellowship Applications

  • Tutor: Dr Karen Hinxman, Imperial College London
  • Usually scheduled: October, January, June
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

This course introduces postdocs to fellowship funding and the process of making a fellowship application.

During the course, you will learn where to look for appropriate fellowship funding, how to apply and how to prepare a written application. Additionally, you will take part in a practice exercise providing insight into the writing and peer review processes.
Successful applicants and panel members from Imperial will share their experience of applying for fellowships in a question and answer session.

Key areas

  • Where to find appropriate fellowship funding
  • How to apply: A-Z of the application process
  • Factors which contribute to successful applications
  • Practice writing a fellowship proposal
  • Gain experience in reviewing fellowship proposals

Further Information

You will be required to write a 2-3 page research proposal as an exercise on this course which will need to cover the following: 

  • Name
  • Title of your project
  • Aims and research questions
  • Background (context, track record)
  • Plan: methodology
  • Impact/outcomes
  • How the fellowship will further your career

Project Management for early career researchers

  • Tutor: Caroline Broad – Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: November, January
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Effective project management (PM) is about creating a balance between task, team and individual.  In this course, we will complete a project initiation document, which will introduce you to the PM language and concepts.  We will practice core project management tools, including SWOT analysis and work breakdown schedules and discuss stakeholder communication and people management skills.

It is a practical rather than theoretical course and you will be encouraged to apply the skills and knowledge developed. The course is delivered by a professional skills trainer and project manager who continues to deliver projects in both a commercial and academic setting.

Key areas

  • Develop your organisational skills
  • Gain insight into commercial project management techniques and applications
     

Pronunciation for non-native English speakers

  • Tutor: Stewart Theobald - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: November
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Who should attend

This half-day course is designed for postdoctoral research staff for whom English is a second language and who wish to improve their speaking clarity and confidence. It will be a practical course looking at the voice issues of the individual, so numbers are limited to 10 per course. By the end of the course, participants will have a better understanding of standard English pronunciation and placement that will help them to improve their speaking clarity and teaching impact.

Key areas

  • Physiology - emphasising standard English placement
  • Forward resonance - to ensure a clear tone
  • Articulation - for clarity of speech
  • Phonetics - standard English phonetic sounds & symbols
  • Pronunciation practice - individual assessment & guidance
  • Stress, rhythm and inflexion - to deepen understanding of standard English

Visit Imperial’s Centre for Academic English for additional support with pronunciation, speaking and writing.

What have past participants found most useful?

The theory of pronunciation, how sounds are made (Postdoc, Life Sciences)

The trainer, he is really good! (Postdoc, Chemistry

Learning about different vowels, stress and inflection in standard English

Resilience in a Research Environment

  • Tutor: Caroline Broad – Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: October
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

How to manage yourself and your work in uncertain times. Looking at:

  • The root cause of stress
  • Develop a growth mind-set
  • The ABC of managing adversity

Supported by thirty minutes pre-work and access to up to two hours of online support materials.

Micro-learning video content – asynchronous material provides stand-alone content that is also in support of interactive workshops. Short online single-topic videos will provide insight into professional development theory and concepts. Three to five-minute interviews provide a specialist perspective. Access is anywhere, anytime, is password protected with the opportunity to re-visit up to 3 months after the end of the programme.

Interactive live workshop – collaborative learning and webinar formats provide an opportunity to understand individual Why? So What? questions, clarify theory, provide discovery around the application of learning Small group discussion will allow peer support and shared experiences in problem-solving.  

Workbook learning – reflective self-assessment questions and quizzes, insights into theories and models with links to further learning and reading, with the opportunity to revisit and provide opportunities for offline learning up to 3 months after the end of the programme.

Science Communication: Reaching a Wider Audience

  • Tutor: Gareth Mitchell - Imperial College London
  • Usually scheduled: March
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Science communication is an increasingly important part of a scientist’s professional identity. Promoting your work and being able to debate its significance or its controversial aspects to a range of audiences is an essential skill and will enhance your job prospects.
This enjoyable course, led by an experienced journalist, will prepare you to talk about your work with scientists outside your specialism, media professionals, and members of the public. Through a hands-on activity with professional audio equipment, you will have the opportunity to explore some new skills by participating in the recording and editing of a short radio feature.

Key Areas

  • To give an awareness of some of the key forms of contemporary science communication
  • To discuss the opportunities and difficulties that arise when scientists engage with the media
  • To help you find your ‘voice’ when discussing your work
  • To learn some tricks and ‘insider secrets’ about how to capture your audience’s attention whether speaking or writing or broadcasting

What have past participants found most useful?

"Getting a journalist’s perspective"

"Radio interview – practicing something that had seemed intimidating beforehand. Very useful in helping to distil responses to the essentials based on the audience."

Taming your inner critic

  • Tutor: Dr Desiree Dickerson - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: September
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

We all have an inner voice in our heads. It is an essential part of what makes us human – it helps us explore ideas without having to physically act out scenarios; it allows us to hold conversations, and remember shopping lists. It is with us from the moment we wake up to the moment we fall asleep. This voice is designed to help you navigate the world and to keep you safe. Problem is, in order to keep you safe it focuses on the negatives, the perceived threats, and all the possible ways that you might mess up, fall down, or embarrass yourself. And that is where we spend a LOT of our time. 

During this three-hour workshop, we explore:

  • Explore how your inner voice shapes your thoughts, your mood, and your choices, and your productivity;
  • Address the critical inner voices that drive perfectionism, imposter syndrome and self-doubt that sabotage your motivation and enjoyment for your work;
  • Shift the spotlight – use our values as a compass and bring our strengths to the fore.
  • Learn how to rewrite that inner critic to a voice that allows for more mental space and energy to think, create, be present, and thrive.

The Pursuit of Wellbeing

Train your brain to protect your mental health and make you feel better even in stressful times.

Learn habits that change how your brain makes you feel.

  • Learn to use a gratitude diary; it increases your brain’s positive emotional response and triggers positive emotions more often during your day.
  • Learn the process of forgiveness, letting go of hurt reduces stress, depression and the chance of heart problems. Learn about self forgiveness if you’ve hurt someone else.
  • Mindfulness is a wellbeing superpower, it reduces your stress re-sponse leading to improved physical and mental health. It shrinks your amygdala and increases the density of the front of your brain which is associated with emotional control.
  • If you want to be happier today, be kinder today. Learn the skills of kindness, become a better person.
  • Pessimism is absolutely toxic for your mental and physical health. Learn to become an optimist or a realistic pessimist and understand how to use your pessimism in a positive way.
  • Learn how to develop a strategy map to improve your mental health using the techniques explained in this programme.

Why invest in your Emotional Wellbeing? 

  • Your mental health will be better, you will feel better more often.
  • You will be up to six times less likely to develop a mental health issue such as depression or anxiety.
  • You will develop emotional resilience, allowing you to respond in a healthy and sustainable way to the stresses and traumas of your life.
  • You will have more and better relationships, at home and at work.
  • Your physical health is likely to benefit significantly and you are less likely to die younger than your peers.
  • You are more likely to get promoted at work and earn a higher income.
  • You increase the chance that those closest to you will benefit from good mental health.

Time Management for Postdocs

  • Tutors: Bernie Babel & Dr Ines Perpetuo – Imperial College London
  • Usually scheduled: February, June
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

"I don't have time to get it all done."
"I don't have time to write that paper."
"My PI/students/family keep asking me to do things"

Being a postdoc can be a frantic, reactive and stressful time but it doesn't need to be, this course is aimed at those who would like to take back some control over their time.

Key areas

  • Identify and overcome personal time management issues
  • Discuss strategies to work more efficiently
  • Learn to prioritise and keep to objectives
  • Talk about assertiveness
  • Discuss the consequences of bad time management

Towards Managing Your First Research Group

  • Tutor: Dr Tracy Bussoli and Stefanie Edler-Wollstein – Imperial College London
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Making the move from working with others on research projects to managing and directing your own independently funded programme requires more than an excellent research record. Our research has shown that new Principal Investigators are concerned with management issues: time, staff and funding being the major hurdles.

This one-day course for aspiring Principal Investigators will enable you to explore some of these issues by working through a series of real-life examples to develop a personal plan for managing your first research group. At the end of the course day, participants are invited to a drinks reception followed by a celebratory dinner (finish time 20.30).

Key areas

  • Identify your personal strengths, weaknesses, values, and motivations
  • Examine a variety of leadership and management approaches
  • Explore recruitment methods to attract and recruit the right people
  • Learn practical techniques to prioritise and manage your time successfully
  • Define and create a research profile for your laboratory or group

Voice Projection for Effective Lecturing

  • Tutor: Stewart Theobald - Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: March
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

This is a participatory course developed from vocal techniques practised by actors. It will enable you to discover your true voice, work on exercises to enhance its range, clarity, power, tone and colour, allowing you to lecture or deliver an engaging presentation with ease. The aim of this course is to introduce postdocs and fellows to the opportunities of improved vocal projection and the benefits that this brings. We will work as a group on various physical and vocal exercises in a relaxed atmosphere. So be prepared to relax, kick off your shoes and maybe even lie on the floor.

Key areas

  • Discover how and why we sound the way we do
  • Understand the causes of difficulty and implications of unhealthy voice production
  • Discover how relaxation, breathing and vocal exercises can improve projection, clarity and reduce vocal strain
  • Practice techniques to prevent and cure any vocal strain or lack of projection and clarity
  • Look at the effects of posture and tension on vocal projection
  • Take part in voice and articulation exercises
  • Understand resonance placement and the effects this has on projection, clarity and range

What have past participants found most useful?

"The breathing and relaxation techniques for the voice – it was all extremely useful!"

"The understanding of why I strain my voice and practical warm-up exercises to improve it"

"Exercises to help relax and project for clarity and authority"

 

Wellbeing in Research

  • Tutor: Desiree Dickerson – Independent Consultant
  • Usually scheduled: May
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

Academia is an ultramarathon that we try to run as a sprint. This approach tends to leave us with little time or energy for life outside of work and very few resources to cope when we face challenges. But a healthier approach to research is possible and is essential if you want to build a sustainable career in academia (or anywhere else in this fast-paced, competitive world we live in).

Despite our increasing diversity, academics tend to harbour a common chorus of voices in our heads, Voices that demand perfection or that tell us we aren’t good enough and we don’t belong here; voices that have driven us to excel, but that also charge a pretty high tax. A tax on our emotional, mental and physical health.

Yes, the environment is a contributor to the unhealthy, counterproductive lifestyle many of us live. However, we as individuals can address the way we approach academia to buffer us against stress and burnout, worry and fear, and the toxic competition we are often surrounded by.

This workshop provides you with tools to increase your resilience to stress, anxiety and burnout, and to enhance your overall well-being. We explore:

  • The self-critical inner voices that sabotage your motivation and enjoyment for your work;
  • How your mindset can help or hinder your day-to-day life and future career prospects;
  • How certain maladaptive coping strategies (e.g. procrastination and avoidance) maintain these self-sabotaging thought and behaviour cycles;
  • How to reshape your thinking and behaviour patterns to work for you in pursuit of your goals

Writing for Publication: the essentials

  • Tutors: Centre for Academic English (CfAE) at Imperial: Dr Julie King, Hilary Glasman-Deal, June Hammond, Robin Mowat and Andrew Northern
  • Usually scheduled: December, March
  • Visit our online calendar to find out about scheduled courses

Overview

This one-day workshop, developed and delivered by the (CfAE), provides targeted input and training to help you write more effectively for publication. The training is personalised to help you learn how to identify the features of successfully published texts in your discipline.

Key areas

You will learn:

  • To use your reading as a tool to develop writing techniques for successful publication
  • To organise and connect information in your text to enhance readability and flow
  • To make language choices that improve the impact and clarity of your writing

What have past participants found most useful?

“I will definitely apply the reverse-engineering method and I can already see the benefits in my reading and writing.”

“Main takeaways were the structure and modelling of writing research papers, as well as using compelling language to communicate the main message of the research.”

“I found the mix of teaching, small group work, independent work, and then discussion really useful.”