Testing a participant of a dementia study at Imperial College London's School of Public Health

What type of studies are being conducted?

Studies may vary from simple questionnaires to clinical trials investigating new preventative treatments. Those on the register will be given full details of each study and will have time to consider whether they would like to get involved. You are under no obligation to take part in any study just because you have agreed to be on the register.

AHEAD, DFP, eFINGER-PRINT

AHEAD 3-45:

 A new Alzheimer’s treatment trial for cognitively healthy people between 55 - 80 years of age, selected for having increased amyloid load in the brain. The study aims to test the safety and effectiveness of an antibody treatment (Lecanemab) to clear soluble amyloid aggregates from the brain and prevent their damaging effects on neurons and cognitive function. >100 participants have been screened, which has included multiple visits for medical examination, blood tests, cognitive screening tests and brain imaging. We are very grateful for all the time given by our participants so far. This study is a collaboration with The Imperial NHS Memory Unit at Charing Cross Hospital and we hope to randomise our first participant into the treatment phase of the study before the end of the year. It is becoming clearer that removal of amyloid deposits in the brain in those who have no, or mild, memory and thinking problems is related to better results with the treatment than for those with Alzheimer’s Disease or Dementia. Thus we hope to be contributing to worthwhile research on this monoclonal antibody treatment.

CHARIOT:PRO Substudy.

 

An observational study examining changes in cognition over time, and how we can best identify these at an early stage. Involves a medical health check, physical and neurological examinations and cognitive assessments.

The SubStudy completed enrolment in 2018 and is no longer recruiting participants.

The purpose of SubStudy is to investigate what measures of cognition (memory, thinking, problem solving) everyday functions & a range of biological imaging and epidemiological data best predict the worsening of these measurements due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Beta-amyloid (amyloid) is a protein that forms dense plaques on the outside of brain cells. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are used to detect amyloid. While most individuals aged 60+ have variable amounts of amyloid, research indicates it may be a risk factor associated with the development of AD.

Volunteers who have consented to join the CHARIOT register are invited to participate in our research studies.

Please visit our  page to find out more.

DFP

DFP (Deep & Frequent Phenotyping) is being run by the University of Oxford. DFP aims to develop methods to detect early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) using biomarkers.
Biomarkers can determine change taking place in someone, even when a person may not have apparent symptoms. DFP is designed to identify biomarkers (both established and novel) for AD, to determine who might later develop the disease. DFP looks at changes in the brain and body, across a range of people who may/may not develop AD and looks for a range of biomarkers that might be used to monitor the progression of Dementia and target therapies and interventions for those most likely to benefit from them.

Approximately 250 cognitively healthy Participants, aged 60+, are being recruited to the study.

Assessments over 12 months include: cognitive/physical assessments, an ophthalmological assessment, brain imaging including PET, MRI, and EEG. DFP also looks at the way participants move with gait assessments, takes spinal fluid, saliva, tear, blood, and urine samples.

AGE's involvement in the DFP study includes conducting ophthalmological assessments, to use retinal imaging and tear sample collection for AD biomarker discovery, occurring at baseline, day 180 & day 365.
To date, AGE has taken images for 7 participants, and hosted 11 visits.

World Wide FINGERS

eFINGER_PRINT

DFP (Deep & Frequent Phenotyping) is being run by the University of Oxford. DFP aims to develop methods to detect early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) using biomarkers.
Biomarkers can determine change taking place in someone, even when a person may not have apparent symptoms. DFP is designed to identify biomarkers (both established and novel) for AD, to determine who might later develop the disease. DFP looks at changes in the brain and body, across a range of people who may/may not develop AD and looks for a range of biomarkers that might be used to monitor the progression of Dementia and target therapies and interventions for those most likely to benefit from them.

Approximately 250 cognitively healthy Participants, aged 60+, are being recruited to the study.

Assessments over 12 months include: cognitive/physical assessments, an ophthalmological assessment, brain imaging including PET, MRI, and EEG. DFP also looks at the way participants move with gait assessments, takes spinal fluid, saliva, tear, blood, and urine samples.

AGE's involvement in the DFP study includes conducting ophthalmological assessments, to use retinal imaging and tear sample collection for AD biomarker discovery, occurring at baseline, day 180 & day 365.
To date, AGE has taken images for 7 participants, and hosted 11 visits.

MET FINGER

The AGE Research Unit is collaborating with partner institutes in Sweden and Finland on the MET-FINGER Trial. MET-FINGER is a randomised controlled trial which will investigate how a combination of lifestyle changes (healthy eating, physical activity, brain-stimulating activities and heart health monitoring) and the anti-diabetic medication Metformin may help reduce the risk of Dementia. Metformin is a safe and effective drug for treating type-2 diabetes. Studies show that individuals with diabetes may be more likely to develop Dementia, and Metformin may have a beneficial impact on the brain. The study will take place across the three countries with 600 participants receiving the interventions over two years. We will send invitations to selected CHARIOT Register participants in 2023 and 2024.

Previous research studies

CHARIOT: PRO Main Study

An observational study examining changes in cognition over time, and how we can best identify these at an early stage. Involves medical health check, physical and neurological examinations and cognitive assessments.

Generation 1 and 2

The Generation study was sponsored by Novartis and Amgen as part of the Alzheimer’s prevention initiative. An anti-amyloid drug was being assessed for safety and efficacy in the prevention or delay of the onset of Alzheimer's in people at risk for developing symptoms based on their age and genetic status. This study was discontinued across all sites worldwide on 11th July due to safety concerns. The AGE Research Unit screened many volunteers for inclusion in the trial; however, only a small number were actually started on treatment. Thus, we are pleased that not many of our participants were exposed to potential risks to their safety. People who were on treatment are being followed up for 6 months to provide information on their health and cognitive status.

Press Release

Previous Studies

Neurovision

This study involves research into changes in the eye that might accompany the early development of Alzheimer’s Disease. We use an experimental imaging technique to highlight plaques in the back of the eye.  

The UK Prescreening Study

A study to assess memory function in individuals who feel they have noticed recent changes in their memory and to identify people interested in being involved in preventative trials.

Previous Studies

TOMMORROW

An international clinical trial to determine whether a genetic biomarker can predict an individual’s risk of developing memory problems and determine whether a specific treatment would help delay the onset of memory problems in people who are at high risk.

MULTIMODE Study

Volunteers who have consented to join the CHARIOT register are invited to participate in our research studies.

Please visit our Get involved page to find out more.

CHARIOT COVID-19 Rapid Response study (CCRR)

CHARIOT COVID-19 Rapid Response study (CCRR

 

A collaborative initiative run from Imperial College London between groups within the School of Public Health and the National Heart and Lung Institute. A key objective of this study is to examine, and track over time, the age-group specific prevalence of past symptomatic COVID-19 infection and incidence (new cases) of symptomatic COVID-19 infection in older adults (50+ years) in London and the surrounding area. This will enable the ‘real-time’ monitoring of the pandemic in a small geographical area, linking self-reported community disease surveillance (proxy for mild to moderate disease) with laboratory-confirmed disease surveillance (proxy for disease requiring hospitalisation).

Secondly, we aim to measure the impact of the COVID-19 epidemic and preventive measures (social isolation/distancing) on the mental and physical well-being of the population. We hope these findings will Identify lifestyle, biomedical and psychosocial factors that determine vulnerability and resilience to COVID-19 infection.

The study has invited ~40,000 CHARIOT register participants, to complete an online questionnaire weekly for up to a year. The Register participants may also refer members of their household to participate, provided they are aged 18+. The weekly questionnaire will contain questions surround COVID-19 symptomology and exposure risks. Participants will also be asked questions surrounding their health behaviour and wellbeing 6-weekly.

Further information

If you would like any further information on our studies, please do get in touch at dementia.prevention@imperial.ac.uk