Many Tribology Group publications are Open Access thanks to funding from the EPSRC.

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Rycerz:2019:10.1007/s11249-019-1174-7,
author = {Rycerz, P and Kadiric, A},
doi = {10.1007/s11249-019-1174-7},
journal = {Tribology Letters},
title = {The influence of slide–roll ratio on the extent of micropitting damage in rolling–sliding contacts pertinent to gear applications},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11249-019-1174-7},
volume = {67},
year = {2019}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Micropitting is a type of surface damage that occurs in rolling–sliding contacts operating under thin oil film, mixed lubrication conditions, such as those formed between meshing gear teeth. Like the more widely studied pitting damage, micropitting is caused by the general mechanism of rolling contact fatigue but, in contrast to pitting, it manifests itself through the formation of micropits on the local, roughness asperity level. Despite the fact that micropitting is increasingly becoming a major mode of gear failure, the relevant mechanisms are poorly understood and there are currently no established design criteria to assess the risk of micropitting occurrence in gears or other applications. This paper provides new understanding of the tribological mechanisms that drive the occurrence of micropitting damage and serves to inform the ongoing discussions on suitable design criteria in relation to the influence of contact slide–roll ratio (SRR) on micropitting. A triple-disc rolling contact fatigue rig is used to experimentally study the influence of the magnitude and direction of SRR on the progression of micropitting damage in samples made of case-carburised gear steel. The test conditions are closely controlled to isolate the influence of the variable of interest. In particular, any variation in bulk heating at different SRRs is eliminated so that tests are conducted at the same film thickness for all SRRs. The results show that increasing the magnitude of SRR increases the level of micropitting damage and that negative SRRs (i.e. the component where damage is being accumulated is slower) produce more micropitting than the equivalent positive SRRs. Measurements of elastohydrodynamic film thickness show that in the absence of bulk heating, increasing SRR does not cause a reduction in EHL film thickness and therefore this cannot be the reason for the increased micropitting at higher SRRs. Instead, we show that the main mechanism by which increase in SRR
AU - Rycerz,P
AU - Kadiric,A
DO - 10.1007/s11249-019-1174-7
PY - 2019///
SN - 1023-8883
TI - The influence of slide–roll ratio on the extent of micropitting damage in rolling–sliding contacts pertinent to gear applications
T2 - Tribology Letters
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11249-019-1174-7
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/70224
VL - 67
ER -