Imperial College London

Professor Maggie Dallman becomes first Vice President (International)

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Professor Maggie Dallman in her lab

Professor Maggie Dallman continues to lead research into immunology and inflammation

Professor Maggie Dallman OBE has been named Imperial College London’s first Vice President (International).

Professor Dallman will continue in her current roles as Associate Provost (Academic Partnerships) and Professor of Immunology.

Speaking about her appointment, Professor Dallman said: "I'm thrilled to be leading our mission to broaden and strengthen our collaborations with academia, research and government institutions around the world, supported by the excellent team in the International Relations Office.

"During my career at Imperial I've seen first-hand the importance of international collaboration.

"Imperial's excellence arises from attracting talented people and working with leading institutions from across many different regions.

"At a time when international mobility is under threat, it is more important than ever that we defend our values, celebrate our diversity, and forge new connections around the world."

Growing globally

Professor Dallman plays a central role in developing educational and research links with international strategic partners, such as MIT, Tsinghua, TUM and Tokyo Tech.

In a message to Imperial staff, President Alice Gast said: "Imperial's international activity has grown and, according to our colleagues and our alumni, our visibility is increasing around the world. We have been purposeful in pursuing international collaborations, working to address global challenges, and recruiting talented staff and students from around the world. We have been named by Times Higher Education as the UK?s most international university for two years in a row.

Maggie Dallman and Alice Gast with alumni in Shanghai
Professor Dallman and President Gast met alumni in Shanghai earlier this month

"We have forged new collaborations in Cyprus, China, Germany, Japan to complement our work in Singapore, throughout Africa, the USA and elsewhere. Much of this activity comes about thanks to the tireless efforts of Professor Maggie Dallman, our Associate Provost (Academic Partnerships) and Professor of Immunology in the Department of Life Sciences, and her team. In her Associate Provost role, Maggie is the academic lead on both the College's Societal Engagement Strategy and our International Relations.

Maggie Dallman at a community event in White City
Professor Dallman continues to lead community engagement in White City

"Her excellent leadership in societal engagement is bearing fruit in White City with the Invention Rooms and our community collaborations.

"I am pleased to say that we have redefined Maggie's position to be Vice President (International) and Associate Provost (Academic Partnerships). This designation is highly appropriate recognition for her outstanding work on so many fronts in furthering Imperial's strategy."

Strengthening ties with global partners is a fundamental part of Imperial's strategy. Around two-thirds of research publications are co-authored with international collaborators.

Professor Dallman joined Imperial College in 1994 as a lecturer in the Department of Biology and became Reader in Immunoregulation in 1996 and Professor of Immunology three years later.

Since 2001 she has held increasingly senior positions at Imperial including Head Section Immunology and Infection, Campus Dean and Deputy Principal for the Faculty of Natural Sciences, becoming Dean in 2008.

Professor Dallman took up her most recent role as Associate Provost (Academic Partnerships) in 2015.

Reporter

Stephen Johns

Stephen Johns
Communications and Public Affairs

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Contact details

Tel: +44 (0)20 7594 9531
Email: s.johns@imperial.ac.uk

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