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Explore the drop down lists below to find out more about current PhD studentships. 

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PhD in modelling methods for acoustic and elastic waves (Prof Mike Lowe, Prof Richard Craster)

Supervisors:  Professor Mike Lowe,  Professor Richard Craster

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of NonDestructive Evaluation (NDE) leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at an enhanced UK/EU student rate) provided by the European Union. The start date is flexible.  This will be a joint project of the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The PhD student will be located in the Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) group in Mechanical Engineering, which is a strong scientific and social community, covering interests across the spectrum from applied mathematics to software licensing, spin-out companies and technology transfer with many established industry partners.

The work of the PhD will be to pursue the solution of a long-standing challenge relating to the calculation of the properties of acoustic and elastic waves travelling in waveguides of regular geometric forms such as plates and pipes and ultimately to structured, or layered media, relevant to metamaterials and metasurfaces. There are now many methods for guided wave calculations, covered in a long history of research, including work done by Profs Craster and Lowe. Some of the key methods are embodied in the world-leading commercial software package DISPERSE, created and supported by the NDE group since 1992, and licensed by the college. However there is currently no robust automatic way to calculate the properties of a particular kind of problem: leaky guided waves, which radiate waves into a surrounding medium (as in the picture), without needing intervention by research specialists.  The PhD project will investigate some new ideas to see if this can be solved. This will involve ingenious creative thinking about the mathematics, following through to delivery in algorithms and demonstration on a range of real industrial application problems. As well as the PhD, the project offers the intellectual reward of solving an internationally-recognised problem for which there is real industrial value and following it through into applications for metasurfaces and smart coatings.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st class honours degree in Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics or Physics, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Prof Craster r.craster@imperial.ac.uk or Prof Lowe m.lowe@imperial.ac.uk  Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Prof Craster or Prof Lowe. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled

PhD Studentship #1 in Magnetic Resonance Imaging System Engineering (Dr Mike Ristic)

Supervisor: Dr Mike Ristic

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of Magnetic Resonance Imaging system engineering leading to the award of a PhD degree. The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by The Wellcome Trust and the Department.

Recent research in the Department has resulted in the development of a novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system designed to exploit field-related anisotropies of collagen. Conventional MRI cannot accurately diagnose tissues such as ligaments, tendons and cartilage because the received signal is too weak and those tissues appear very dark. However the signal intensity can be significantly increased changing the orientation of the main field to the subject, and is maximized if the angle is 55 degrees (the “Magic Angle” effect). The prototype MRI employs a magnet that can be rotated about 2 axes and it is particularly well suited for the imaging of limbs. Also, by using image processing techniques to analyse the signal variation with the field angle, it is possible to obtain important new information about tissue microstructures. The aim of the current project is to carry out the necessary technical work related to MRI system and image processing and to conduct early stage clinical trials.

This PhD project will focus on the MRI aspects related to maximizing the image quality. This will primarily involve radio frequency (RF) front end design using multiple antenna arrays, methods for automatic tuning in-situ, calibration, and integration with the MRI system. The work will involve a significant amount of electronics development and testing, and it will demand a high level of practical skill.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st class or 2:1 honours degree in Physics or Engineering, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. Experience and understanding of RF electronics and circuits is essential. Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www-staging.imperial.ac.uk/engineering/departments/mechanical-engineering/research/applied-mechanics/medical-engineering/magnetic-resonance-imaging/

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Mike Ristic  m.ristic@imperial.ac.uk. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled

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PhD Studentship #2 in Magnetic Resonance Imaging System Engineering (Dr Mike Ristic)

Supervisor: Dr Mike Ristic

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of Magnetic Resonance Imaging system engineering leading to the award of a PhD degree. The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by The Wellcome Trust and the Department.

Recent research in the Department has resulted in the development of a novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system designed to exploit field-related anisotropies of collagen. Conventional MRI cannot accurately diagnose tissues such as ligaments, tendons and cartilage because the received signal is too weak and those tissues appear very dark. However the signal intensity can be significantly increased changing the orientation of the main field to the subject, and is maximized if the angle is 55 degrees (the “Magic Angle” effect). The prototype MRI employs a magnet that can be rotated about 2 axes and it is particularly well suited for the imaging of limbs. Also, by using image processing techniques to analyse the signal variation with the field angle, it is possible to obtain important new information about tissue microstructures. The aim of the current project is to carry out the necessary technical work related to MRI system and image processing and to conduct early stage clinical trials.

This PhD project will focus on the image processing software that is necessary to process and analyse 3D image data. This will primarily involve computer graphics, registration, MRI image analysis and graphical user interface. Integration with MRI spectrometer system and the magnet positioning system will also be required. Programming will be performed primarily in C++ and possibly Python. The work will demand a high level of practical skill to produce reliable high quality software, and it will also involve liaison with medical specialists who will be the ultimate users.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st class or 2:1 honours degree in Computing or Engineering or a related subject, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. Strong interest and experience in computer graphics and software development for medical image processing are essential. Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www-staging.imperial.ac.uk/engineering/departments/mechanical-engineering/research/applied-mechanics/medical-engineering/magnetic-resonance-imaging/

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Mike Ristic  m.ristic@imperial.ac.uk. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled

Imperial Managers lead by example.

Committedto equality and valuing diversity. We are also an Athena SWAN Silver Award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Two Ticks Employer, and are working in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans people

PhD Studentship in Additive Manufacture for Orthopaedic Surgery (Dr Jonathan Jeffers)

Supervisor: Jonathan Jeffers

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of Additive Manufacture for Orthopaedic Surgery, leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by the NIHR (National Institute for Health Research). NB: to be eligible for this post, you must qualify for the UK/EU student fee rate. If in doubt please check your status at: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/fees-and-funding/tuition-fees/

 In orthopaedic surgery, we repair, reconstruct or replace parts of human joints.  This requires fixing different types of implants to the bone.  Conventional manufacture of orthopaedic implants has been from solid Titanium or CoCrMo alloys or ceramics, which are many times stiffer than the bone.  Exciting new work in our research group proves we can make additively manufactured (AM) lattice structures that have the same mechanical properties as bone. This means we can now control the strain bone experiences in and around the implant. Bone is a dynamic material that responds to strain, getting stronger and denser if the strain increases. Thus, by controlling strain, we can now use the presence of an implant to increase the bone strength. This could be a major breakthrough in orthopaedic implant design.  In this PhD we will demonstrate control of bone strains in a cadaver model of joint preserving and partial joint replacement surgery. We will also investigate methods to maximise the fatigue life of the implant structure when used in these configurations. The project will have AM at its heart, and involve hands on manufacture in Titanium alloy using our Renishaw AM250 system and extensive laboratory testing. Industry partners are Renishaw Plc and Embody Orthopaedic Ltd.

For background information, see our recent AM publications in Applied Materials Today (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmt.2019.02.017) and Biomaterials (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2018.11.026) or visit our news feed on Twitter: @ICbiomechancis or visit Dr Jeffers’s web page https://www.imperial.ac.uk/people/j.jeffers.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st class or 2.1 honours degree in mechanical engineering or a related subject, and a desire to work in a multidisciplinary team of engineers (both academic and industrial), and orthopaedic surgeons. A passion for engineering, demonstrated by extra-curricular activities or industrial experience is also desirable. Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Dr Jonathan Jeffers j.jeffers@imperial.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7594 5471. Interested applicants should send a cover letter and curriculum vitae to Dr Jeffers. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled

PhD Studentship in Biomechanics of the Skin-Prosthetic Interface (Dr Marc Masen)

Supervisors: Dr Marc Masen

Deadline for applying: 15 May 2020

Applications are invited for a fully funded research studentship in the field of Biomechanics & Mechanobiology, leading to the award of a PhD degree. The post is supported by a bursary and fees at the UK student rate provided by the EPSRC Centre For Doctoral Training in Prosthetics and Orthotics (CDT P&O). Candidates should fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award, particularly having no restrictions on how long they can stay in the UK and have been ordinarily resident in the UK for at least 3 years prior to the start of the studentship. Please check your suitability at the following web site: http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/Pages/eligibility.aspx. The project starts in October 2020 and runs for four years.

The CDT P&O combines expertise from the University of Salford, Imperial College London, the University of Strathclyde and the University of Southampton. During the first six months the cohort of students in the CDT is based at the University of Salford; after this the PhD student will move to Imperial College London to complete their PhD programme of research. In the first year, students will undertake a training course which includes a series of taught modules, a short project and a clinical and/or industry placement. Throughout the four-year programme cohort-based activities will ensure students work across the institutions.

 The project: Lower limb prosthetics have proven to be an extremely successful intervention, providing mobility to millions of people. A lower limb prosthetic requires extreme resilience from the skin on the limb stump, because all loads are transferred through the socket-skin interface. The increased demands on the skin may result in a variety of injuries and, indeed, almost a quarter of users discontinue the use of their prosthetic in the first year.

The PhD researcher on this project will follow a combined experimental (mechanical engineering, biomechanics, cell biology) and finite element approach to gain a better understanding of the stump skin-prosthetic interface and to assess potential solutions that allow comfortable and injury-free performance of the prosthetic. This will require a multidisciplinary approach, which will be supported by the supervisory team comprising engineers, clinicians and biologists.

You are an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st or upper 2nd class honours degree in Mechanical Engineering, Bioengineering or a related subject (by the start date of October 2020), and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. An interest in both Computational Methods and Experimental work is essential, as are good observational, team working and communication skills.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Dr Marc Masen at m.masen@imperial.ac.uk or Dr Claire Higgins at c.higgins@imperial.ac.uk. Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Masen. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: 15 May 2020

PhD Studentship in Characterisation Grain Microstructures in Metals using Ultrasound (Dr Bo Lan, Prof Mike Lowe)

This studentship is run from the FIND-CDT based at the University of Bristol. 

More information can be found on the FIND-CDT website. 

PhD Studentship in Development of Dynamic Fracture Testing Techniques for Alloys (Dr Paul Hooper)

Supervisors:  Dr Paul Hooper paul.hooper@imperial.ac.uk and Dr Catrin Davies catrin.davies@imperial.ac.uk 

Industrial Supervisor(s):Dr Mike Cox (AWE) Dr Giles Aldrich-Smith (AWE)

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Background

The effect of loading rates is known to affect the mechanical properties of alloys, especially the yield strength and fracture toughness. Tests performed under quasi-static conditions can be non-conservative for predicting the structural integrity of structures which may experience high speed loading scenarios in service. As loading rates increase, the yield strength increases which can cause a reduction in fracture toughness (cleavage) on the lower shelf, whereas on the upper shelf of the ductile to brittle transition curve, an increase in loading rates could mean an increase in tearing toughness. The order of magnitude of the stress intensity factor rate experienced by a flaw in a structure depends on the type of service. The rate during mechanical testing should be within the order of magnitude expected in service.

It is therefore necessary to define size independent fracture parameters in sub-size fracture toughness specimens to characterise full-thickness behaviour. On the lower shelf (brittle fracture), the Master Curve is employed to define the characteristic temperature T0 which can then predict the equivalent behaviour at different material thicknesses or temperatures. For the upper shelf (ductile fracture), the initiation fracture toughness, from a tearing resistance curve (R-curve) is considered size independent. However, defining an R-curve under high very high-speed loading is extremely challenging. The methods used under quasi-static loading, such as pausing and unloading tests at predefined displacements thus crack extension, do not work at high speed. If the specimen fully fractures during the test, then a final crack length cannot be defined for applications in methods such as the normalisation method. To define a high-speed R-curve requires the design and development of a method to load a compact tension (CT) or single edge notch bend (SENB) specimen very fast but to a fixed displacement to prevent the specimen fully fracturing into 2 pieces so that a final tearing level can be defined.

 

Aims and Objectives

The aims of this project are to understand the influence of strain rate and sample size/constraint on the fracture toughness of nuclear grade A508 forged steel in addition to Ti-6Al-4V manufactured through laser powder bed fusion. This will be achieved through the following objectives:

• Literature review of standard test methods for high strain rate fracture testing and size scale effects on fracture

• Development of a novel rig for high strain rate fracture testing (At the high-speeds required for this programme, means it will not be possible to stop the for the cross-head and test programme will require a rig incorporating shear pins to limit the load while protecting the machine)

• Develop the dynamic fracture testing techniques on the alloys of interest

• Determine the strain rate sensitivity of the fracture behaviour of the alloys considered.

• Develop finite element models and analytical technique to interpret the results obtained.

Eligibility

This PhD will be part of the new Centre for Doctoral Training in Nuclear Energy and will be funded for 4 years in partnership with AWE. To be eligible for a full award a student must have been ordinarily resident in the UK for at least 3 years prior to the start of the studentship.

 Closing date: until post filled

PhD Studentship in Development of Dynamic Fracture Testing Techniques for Alloys (Dr Paul Hooper)

Supervisor: Dr Paul Hooper

Deadline for applying: 21 August 2020

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of fracture and high strain-rate materials characterisation, leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral training in Nuclear Energy and AWE plc. EPSRC candidates should fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award.  Please check your suitability at the following web site:   

http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/Pages/eligibility.aspx

This research project focuses on understanding the influence of strain rate and sample size on the fracture toughness of nuclear grade A508 forged steel and Ti-6Al-4V manufactured through laser powder bed fusion. Conventional fracture toughness methods used under quasi-static loading, such as pausing and unloading tests at predefined displacements do not work at high-speed. If the specimen fully fractures during the test, then a final crack length cannot be measured for applications in methods such as the normalisation method. As a result, innovative high-speed experimental methods are needed to overcome the limitations of the established quasi-statis approach. Design and development of a method to load a compact tension (CT) or single edge notch bend (SENB) specimen at high-speed (>10 m/s), but to a fixed displacement to prevent the specimen fully fracturing into 2 pieces, will be needed so that a final tearing level can be defined. Alongside the experimental aspects of this project, finite element models and analytical techniques will also be developed interpret the results obtained.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st class or 2.1 honours degree in mechanical engineering or a related subject, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. Practical engineering, problem-solving and computational abilities are key skills for this PhD project. Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Dr Paul Hooper paul.hooper@imperial.ac.uk or Dr Catrin Davies catrin.davies@imperial.ac.uk. Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Paul Hooper.  Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: 21th August 2020

PhD Studentship in Estimation of Internal Pipe Wall Temperature under Operating Conditions in Pipe Circuits using Ultrasound (Dr Frederic Cegla)

This studentship is run from the FIND-CDT based at the University of Bristol. 

More information can be found on the FIND-CDT website. 

PhD Studentship in Green Tribology: Degradation and lubrication of stern tube seals (Dr Marc Masen)

Supervisors: Dr Marc Masen

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a fully funded research studentship in the field of Tribology, leading to the award of a PhD degree. The post is supported by a bursary and fees at the UK student rate provided by the Materials Innovation Institute M2i in collaboration with AEGIR-Marine BV. Candidates should fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award. Please check your suitability at the following web site: http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/Pages/eligibility.aspx. The project starts as soon as the post is filled, and runs for four years.

The project: Stern tube seals are elastomeric seals used in seagoing vessels. Their two main functions are to prevent water ingress into the stern tube and to minimize lubricant spillage into the marine environment and the engine chamber of the vessel. Due to environmental concerns, the use of mineral oils for maritime applications that interface with water is not desirable, and a range of bio-friendly lubricants has been introduced. However, these lubricants cause accelerated degradation of the seals, affecting their functionality and durability.

The aim of the research is to investigate the fundamental degradation mechanisms due to lubricant interaction with the sealing system. We will develop new experimental setups and numerical models to assess and describe the degradation of the seals and link this to the functional performance. This PhD studentship is part of a larger project, and the PhD student will work alongside another PhD student, based at the University of Twente, who will focus on the lubrication aspects of the sealing system. The industry sponsor, AEGIR-Marine, is closely involved in the project and part of the PhD project will be spent at their R&D facilities in the Netherlands, investigating the upscaling of the obtained results to actual seals.

You are an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have, or are about to receive, a 1st or upper 2nd class honours degree in Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering or a related subject. You have an enquiring, rigorous and hands-on approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. An interest in both experimental work and modelling techniques is essential, as are good observational, team working and communication skills.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the posts contact Dr Marc Masen at m.masen@imperial.ac.uk. Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Masen. Suitable candidates for the post at Imperial College will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: when post filled

PhD studentship in High-fidelity modelling of clad ballooning during a loss-of-coolant accident (Dr Mike Bluck)

Supervisors: Dr Michael Bluck (Mechanical Engineering), Dr Mark Wenman (Materials)

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a PhD research studentship in the field of high-fidelity modelling of clad ballooning in nuclear reactor loss-of-coolant accidents.  The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by the EPSRC and the National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL). Candidates should fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award. Please check your suitability.

The loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is generally the limiting design-basis accident in a LWR. In the event of such an accident, the fission chain reaction is automatically shutdown, however there remains ‘decay heat’ generation, perhaps 7% of operating power, for some hours following the accident. Removal of this decay heat requires that sufficient coolant can be brought into the core, and that the core, during this time, retains a "coolable geometry". This is not guaranteed - excessively hot, internally pressurised fuel pins can deform - so called ‘clad ballooning’ - and possibly form blockages to the flow. 

A major focus of the reactor safety case is therefore to ensure that the consequences of a LOCA are manageable. To do so, we must understand and model both the complex mechanical behaviour of the fuel and outer cladding, and the coolant flow over the fuel pins. Indeed, these effects are strongly interdependent.

The aim is to develop a state-of-the-art computer code system to predict the 3-D clad ballooning behaviour of rods in a light water reactor (LWR) fuel bundle during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The code system will involve the dynamic coupling of a state-of-the-art 3-D fuel rod performance code with a state-of-the-art 3-D thermal-hydraulics code, will be validated using experimental data, and will be demonstrated for an LWR fuel assembly. 

The position is a collaboration between the Nuclear Engineering Group within the Mechanical Engineering Department and the Engineering Alloys Group within the Department of Materials. This PhD is funded by the UKRI/EPSRC and the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL).

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st class or 2:1 honours degree in mechanical engineering or a related subject, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. An interest in fracture mechanics is essential.  Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

Find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area:

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Department of Materials

More information on how to apply

Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Michael Bluck, m.bluck@imperial.ac.uk.  Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled 

Imperial Managers lead by example. Committed to equality and valuing diversity. We are also an Athena SWAN Silver Award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Two Ticks Employer, and are working in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans people.

PhD Studentship in Industrial Implementation of New Techniques for Inspection of Rough Defects (Prof Mike Lowe, Prof Richard Craster)

This studentship is run from the FIND-CDT based at the University of Bristol. 

More information can be found on the FIND-CDT website.

PhD Studentship in Metal Forming and Materials Modelling (Dr Xiaoyu Xi)

Supervisor: Dr Xiaoyu Xi

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of Metal Forming and Materials Modelling, leading to the award of a PhD degree. The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by the sponsors in the aviation, aerospace and railway industries.

A number of PhD positions are available for UK and EU nationals. The research involves development of advanced metal forming and modelling techniques, and will be carried out at the Metal Forming and Materials Modelling Group. The research activities of the group cover a wide range of areas from theoretical and computational solid mechanics to experimental materials research. These research works involve a wide range of industries, including aerospace, aeronautical, automotive and locomotive.

There are two main research themes within the group: Metal Forming Technologies and Materials Modelling. The Metal Forming research focuses on the development of advanced forming processes e.g. manufacturing lightweight structural materials into high-strength and complex shaped engineering components and cloud based FEA (Contact Dr. L. Wang at liliang.wang@imperial.ac.uk to make enquires). The Materials Modelling tackles the fundamental challenges in materials behaviour at microscopic scale e.g. the distribution and evolution of microstructure and defects as functions of loading, temperature and loading rate, and link them with the macroscopic mechanical responses e.g. formability and damage tolerance (Contact Dr. J. Jiang at jun.jiang@imperial.ac.uk to make enquires).

Over the past decade, the group has successfully developed several world-leading forming technologies and novel materials modelling methods. These techniques have been directly implemented in automotive and aerospace industries. Three research centres and one joint lab have been established. The group is currently led by several world-leading experts in material forming, including Prof. Jianguo Lin, FREng, Dr. Liliang Wang, Dr. Daniel Balint and Dr. Jun Jiang, and has secured over £15 M funding from industries, UK and EU research councils. Over 60 research staff and students are supported through them. To view a current list of projects please visit our website http://www.imperial.ac.uk/metal-forming/.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st class honours degree (or equivalent) and/or a distinction MSc degree (if applicable) in engineering or a related subject, and have an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to: http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to: http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Dr Xiaoyu Xi at x.xi@imperial.ac.uk, +44 (0)20 7594 9546. Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Xiaoyu Xi. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled

Imperial Managers lead by example.

Committed to equality and valuing diversity. We are also an Athena SWAN Silver Award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Two Ticks Employer, and are working in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans people

PhD Studentship in Metal-Forming and Materials Modelling (Dr Jun Jiang)

Supervisor: Dr Jun Jiang

Deadline for applying: 31 October 2019

Fully/Partially– funded PhD opportunities in Metal-Forming and Materials Modelling Group

(Overseas Tuition Fees paid, Living expenses of £16,500 per year for 3 years)

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/metal-forming/

 The Metal Forming and Materials Modelling group wishes to provide 1x FULLY funded and 2x partially funded studentships to EXCEPTIONAL candidates to conduct PhD research work in the Mechanical Engineering department, at Imperial College London. The research work will be focused on the development of novel metal forming technologies, e.g. lightweight metal forming technologies, such as forging of lightweight gears; materials and process experiments and modelling to address fundamental problems including the evolution of defects, damage and microstructure, and their effects on macroscopic crystalline material deformation behaviour for a wide range of applications, particularly in automotive and aerospace.

The Department was the top-ranked Mechanical Engineering Department in the 2014 UK REF exercise. The Metal Forming and Materials Modelling group is recognised as being at the leading-edge of research in hot and warm forming technologies for lightweight components and structures, which covers a wide range of activities, in theory, innovative testing, materials and process modelling. The Group has made a significant contribution to the development of new forming technologies and novel materials modelling methods. Led by 4 academic staff, the Metal-forming and Materials Modelling Research Group has expanded very quickly during the last five years with 3 industry funded research centres and 1 joint laboratory. It has secured PI funding of over £15 million from EPSRC, Innovate UK, EC and international companies, and has been involved in projects with total funding of over £50 million.

Potential Candidates must have a distinction honour and ranked at the top 10% of an MSc or MEng course in Mechanical/Materials/Aerospace/Automotive Engineering. Background in metal forming is beneficial but not essential.    

For further details of the post contact Dr Jun Jiang (www.imperial.ac.uk/people/jun.jiang), at jun.jiang@imperial.ac.uk.

Interested applicants should complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until 31st of Oct 2019

Imperial Managers lead by example. Committed to equality and valuing diversity. We are also an Athena SWAN Silver Award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Two Ticks Employer, and are working in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans people

PhD Studentship in modelling compressive failure of composite pipes (Prof Daniele Dini)

Supervisor: Professor Daniele Dini

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of computational modelling in composite failure, leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The post is supported by a full bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by EPSRC and Shell (EPSRC industrial Cooperative Award in Science and Technology – iCASE). The position is open to UK and EU (ordinarily resident in the UK throughout the three years period preceding the start of the studentship) students who fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award.  Please check your suitability at the following web site: http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/Pages/eligibility.aspx

The project’s aim is to understand the mechanism of compressive failure in composite pipes, a key technology for deep water applications. This will require the development of advanced models to study the effects of the fibre/matrix interface (interphase region), fibre debonding and matrix slippage on the composite longitudinal compressive and fatigue strength of flexible composite pipes in extreme environments, with the aim of providing a better understanding of the relevant failure mechanisms of thermoplastic composite materials under deepwater working conditions. The research carried out will be strongly complemented by the experimental techniques developed by the Shell AIMS Centre at Imperial college to study fibre/matrix interfacial strength, DIC methods to measure critical strains and stresses and provide evidence of failure modes in different conditions.  

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a first class honours degree in Mechanical/Chemical Engineering, Physics, Material Science, Chemistry, Computing or related subjects, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. An interest in theory and simulation of materials and application of computational methods to engineering problems is essential.  Good team-working, observational and communication skills are also essential.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/tribology

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/theory-and-simulation-of-materials

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Prof. Daniele Dini d.dini@imperial.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7594 7242 or Dr Finn Giuliani f.giuliani@imperial.ac.uk. Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Prof. Dini.  Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled

Imperial Managers lead by example.

Committed to equality and valuing diversity. We are also an Athena SWAN Silver Award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Two Ticks Employer, and are working in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans people

PhD Studentship in modelling lithium-sulfur batteries (Dr Monica Marinescu)

Supervisors: Dr Monica Marinescu

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of battery science and engineering leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by the EPSRC via a Faraday Institution Studentship. Please check your suitability at the following web site: https://epsrc.ukri.org/skills/students/guidance-on-epsrc-studentships/eligibility/.

 Lithium-sulfur batteries have the potential to provide the step increase in energy density required by many applications. Their development is hindered by the fact that performance improvements at coin cell level often do not translate to similar improvements large cells. This research involves developing insights into the difference between mechanisms limiting the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries at coin and pouch cell level. The end goal is the creation of a bank of knowledge that enables the successful translation of technology, such as in the form of a performance predictor model. The modelling toolset created will also be used to optimise cell design. While focused on modelling, the project will also involve the development of bespoke experimental procedures, and close collaboration with experimental groups in Chemical Engineering at Imperial College and University College London. You would be joining a large group of enthusiastic and passionate researchers at Imperial College, by becoming part of the Electrochemical Science and Engineering Group (https://www.imperial.ac.uk/electrochem-sci-eng).

 You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person, with an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. An interest in energy storage technologies is essential. Good team-working, an inquisitive mind and observational and communication skills are essential. You will have a 2:1 or 1st class honours degree in engineering or sciences, and meet the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London.

 To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/electrochem-sci-eng

 For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Dr Monica Marinescu, monica.marinescu@imperial.ac.uk.  Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae and cover letter to Dr Monica Marinescu. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry. 

The Faraday Institution Cluster PhD researchers receive an enhanced stipend over and above the standard EPSRC offer. The total annual stipend is approximately £20,000 (plus London weighting) plus an additional £7,000 annually to cover training and travel costs. Recipients will have access to multiple networking opportunities, industry visits, mentorship, internships, as well as quality experiences that will further develop knowledge, skills, and aspirations https://faraday.ac.uk/education-skills/phd-researchers/.

In order to apply for a Faraday Institution PhD position, you need to do both of the following:

  1. Complete a Faraday Institution expression of interest form https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/9B8V3NB
  2. Follow the university application process as per advert.

Closing date: until post filled

PhD Studentship in Modelling of Lubrication Mechanisms between Wet Hairs (Prof Daniele Dini)

Supervisor: Prof Daniele Dini

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of computational modelling of lubrication mechanisms and molecular interaction responsible for the behaviour of wet hairs, leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The post is supported by a full bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by EPSRC and Procter and Gamble (EPSRC industrial Cooperative Award in Science and Technology – iCASE). The position is open to UK and EU (ordinarily resident in the UK throughout the three years period preceding the start of the studentship) students who fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award.  Please check your suitability at the following web site: http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/Pages/eligibility.aspx

This project aims at studying the detailed interactions responsible for wet friction in hair-to-hair contacts. This will require the development of advanced models to study the effects of the interaction between different molecules and hairs, with the view of shedding light on the mechanisms that govern the performance of different compounds. Molecular models will describe the interactions between agglomerates formed between hair bundles, starting by capturing the physical, mechanical and chemical aspects that govern the interactions between molecules and surfaces and which are representative of combing conditions. Both coarse-grained and classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations will be used for this purpose, with the latter specifically being employed to explore fundamental mechanisms that explain detailed interactions between the molecular species under investigation. The research carried out will be in collaboration with other members of the Tribology Group and the Department of Materials at Imperial College London (Dr Stefano Angioletti-Uberti) and will be strongly complemented by the work carried out by Procter and Gamble in terms of experimental characterisation and products formulation. 

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a first-class honours degree in Physics, Mechanical/Chemical Engineering, Material Science, Chemistry, Computing or related subjects, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. An interest in theory and simulation of materials and application of computational methods to engineering problems is crucial.  Good team-working, observational and communication skills are also essential.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/tribology

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Prof. Daniele Dini d.dini@imperial.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7594 7242. Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Prof. Dini.  Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled

PhD Studentship in Shell University Technology Centre (Dr Janet Wong)

Supervisor: Janet Wong

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of Fuels and Lubricants, leading to the award of a PhD degree. The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate only) and sponsored by Shell. The studentship is for three and a half years from June 2020.

Lubricants are used in engines to reduce friction, to improve machine efficiency and thus reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  Fuel, however may mix with the lubricant during operation, affecting the effectiveness of the lubricant. The proposed research programme is a fundamental study of the influence of fuel on properties of lubricant, with in-situ measurements to be carried out in a modified engine, using various spectroscopic techniques. 

The project is sponsored by the Shell University Technology Centre (UTC) for Lubricants and Fuels based in the Mechanical Engineering Department, Imperial College London, and will take place in the Tribology Group and the Thermofluids Division in this Department.  Both the Tribology Group and the Thermofluids Division are world leaders in their respective fields of tribology, fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, and combustion. Together, they comprise of more than 90 PhD students as well as many post-doctoral researchers and academic staff. It offers a vibrant and multicultural working environment. Laboratories were recently refurbished and are well equipped with an extensive range of instrumentation and extensive computer facilities.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will be an experimentalist and will have a background in Chemical or Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry, Physics or a related field. You will have an enquiring and rigorous approach to research, together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. An interest in engines and basic understanding of their operation with good practical skills is desirable. Training will be given in tribology, thermofluids and the relevant investigative techniques. You will become a skilled communicator, comfortable in an international situation. Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.  The project will involve close collaboration with Shell and you will be expected to visit and communicate with various Shell centres around the world.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post please contact Dr Sarah Matthews (sarah.matthews@shell.com) or Dr Janet Wong (j.wong@imperial.ac.uk). Interested applicants should email an up-to-date curriculum vitae. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form available on the Imperial College London website in order for their qualifications to be assessed by the College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled

PhD Studentship in Split Hopkinson Bar Development for Tensile Testing (Dr Paul Hooper)

Supervisors:  Dr Paul Hooper

Deadline for applying: 21 August 2020

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of high strain-rate materials characterisation, leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by the EPSRC and AWE plc via a CASE award.  EPSRC candidates should fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award.  Please check your suitability at the following web site: http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/Pages/eligibility.aspx

This research involves the development of innovative Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) equipment for testing the plastic stress-strain response of materials at high strain-rates. This is conventionally done with metallic samples under compressive loading. Testing of softer materials (such as organic materials), and other loading types is much less developed. Soft materials are challenging due mismatch in stiffness between the samples and bars. Loading types such as tension and torsion are also more complex due to difficulties in specimen attachment to the incident and transmission bars. These difficulties give rise to large uncertainties in measurements of mechanical properties in soft materials, especially in non-compressive loading.

The objective of this PhD, in partnership with AWE plc, is to overcome these limitations through the development new dynamic tensile testing equipment at strain-rates of 1,000/s and above. The approach taken will be a miniaturised SHPB design that will enable testing of soft materials that are difficult to prepare into test specimens and introducing a high level of automation into the test procedure to reduce or eliminate operator variability. The effects of bar material and connection arrangement between bars and sample will be studied in detail so that uncertainties introduced can be properly characterised and accounted for. The design will also incorporate features that allow collaborative testing in restricted environments employed at AWE such as explosive atmospheres and RA contamination.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st class or 2.1 honours degree in mechanical engineering or a related subject, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. Practical engineering and problem-solving abilities are key skills for this PhD project. Experience with mechatronic systems would be advantageous. Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Dr Paul Hooper paul.hooper@imperial.ac.uk. Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Paul Hooper.  Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry. 

Closing date: 21th August 2020

PhD Studentship in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar Development for Tensile Testing (Dr Paul Hooper)

Supervisors:  Dr Paul Hooper and Prof John Dear paul.hooper@imperial.ac.uk

Industrial Supervisor(s):Dr Mike Cox (AWE) Dr Giles Aldrich-Smith (AWE)

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Background and project Aims

The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) is an experimental apparatus for testing the plastic stress-strain response of materials at high strain-rates. This is conventionally  done with metallic samples under compressive loading. Testing of softer materials (such as organic materials), and other loading types is much less developed. Soft materials are challenging due mismatch in stiffness between the samples and bars. Loading types such as tension and torsion are also more complex due to difficulties in specimen attachment to the incident and transmission bars. These difficulties give rise to large uncertainties in measurements of mechanical properties in soft materials, especially in non-compressive loading.

The objective of this PhD, in partnership with AWE plc, is to overcome these limitations through the development new dynamic tensile testing equipment at strain-rates of 1,000/s and above. The approach taken will be a miniaturised SHPB design to enable testing of soft materials that are difficult to prepare into samples and introducing a high level of automation into the test procedure to reduce or eliminate operator variability. The effects of bar material and connection arrangement between bars and sample will be studied in detail so that uncertainties introduced can be properly characterised and accounted for. The design will also incorporate features that allow collaborative testing in restricted  environments employed at AWE such as explosive atmospheres and RA contamination.

Project Objectives

• Literature review, design of equipment with manufacturing company.

• Test programme developed.

• Prototype of tension Hopkinson bar produced.

• Carry out test programme on proto-type Hopkinson bar.

• Feed-back on material result and practice of using the Hokinson bar design.

• Development of final-version of tension Hopkinson bar.

• Test verification of final-version of tension Hopkinson bar.

• Evaluation of results and report findings.

Eligibility

This PhD will be an industrial CASE award supported by EPSRC and AWE ( https://epsrc.ukri.org/skills/students/coll/icase/intro/ ). It will be funded for 3.5 years. To be eligible for a full award a student must have been ordinarily resident in the UK for at least 3 years prior to the start of the studentship.

 Closing date: until post filled

PhD Studentship in the feasibility study of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of nickel-based superalloys (Dr Jun Jiang)

Supervisor: Dr Jun Jiang

Deadline for applying: 30 November 2019

EPSRC Future Nuclear Energy Doctor Training Centre and UK Atomic Energy Authority co-found a PhD scholarship in the Novel Metal Forming Group - (Tuition fees paid, Living expenses of £16,500 per year for 4 years)

We will provide a full studentship to Home/EU students to support their research activities leading to the award of a PhD degree. The potential student should expect to obtain 1st or minimum 2:1 in his/her 1st degree from Mechanical/Materials Engineering/Physics Department.

The research work will be focused on the feasibility study of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of nickel-based superalloys, stainless steel for key future fusion reactor parts. The Department was the top-ranked Mechanical Engineering Department in the 2014 UK REF exercise. The Novel Metal Forming group is recognised as being at cutting-edge research in hot and warm forming technologies for lightweight components and structures, which covers a wide range of activities e.g. theory, innovative testing, materials and process modelling. The Group has made a significant contribution to the development of new forming technologies and novel materials modelling methods.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to http://www.imperial.ac.uk/metal-forming/

For information on how to apply, go to http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Dr Jun Jiang, at jun.jiang@imperial.ac.uk.

Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Jiang. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: 30 November 2019

Imperial Managers lead by example. Committed to equality and valuing diversity. We are also an Athena SWAN Silver Award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Two Ticks Employer, and are working in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans people

PhD Studentship in the influence of inelastic damage on the crack growth behaviour of 316H stainless steels (Dr Catrin Davies)

Supervisor: Dr Catrin Davies

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of fracture mechanics leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by the EPSRC and a stipend enhancement from EDF Energy. EPSRC candidates should fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award.  Please check your suitability at the following web site: http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/Pages/eligibility.aspx

Industrial engineering components operating at high temperature can exhibit time dependent creep strain and damage. Suitable levels of fracture resistance must be demonstrated in these components (such as UK nuclear plant components) over the entirety of their lifetime to ensure structural safety. The stress-strain and failure properties of such components can change with time as a result of creep strain accumulation and thermal ageing effects. In addition, physical creep damage can develop in the form of cavitation and micro-cracking. The impact of such creep strain and damage on a component’s resistance to crack growth by creep, fatigue and ductile mechanisms needs to be understood. Accelerated creep testing in the laboratory requires tests to be performed at relatively high loads which can also generate significant plastic strains in test samples, the effects of which also needs to be understood to enable the transfer of test results to plant components.

The aims of this project are to determine the effects of prior inelastic (creep and plastic) strain and damage on the crack growth behaviour by creep, fatigue and ductile crack growth mechanisms in Type 316H steels.  The PhD will involve the development of novel experimental test techniques and numerical modelling to describe and predict the influence of inelastic strain and damage on the fracture behaviour of Type 316H steel and to propose methods for including the effects of inelastic damage into Industrial defect assessment procedures.

This PhD is part of the EDF Energy High Temperature Centre at Imperial College London and will receive supervision from EDF Energy in addition to academic supervision from Dr Catrin Mair Davies.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st class or 2:1 honours degree in mechanical engineering or a related subject, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. An interest in fracture mechanics is essential.  Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

 For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Catrin Mair Davies catrin.davies@imperial.ac.uk.  Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled 

Imperial Managers lead by example.

Committed to equality and valuing diversity. We are also an Athena SWAN Silver Award winner, a Stonewall Diversity Champion, a Two Ticks Employer, and are working in partnership with GIRES to promote respect for trans people

PhD Studentship in thermoacoustics of future hybrid rocket engines (Prof Aimee Morgans)

Supervisor: Aimee Morgans

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the thermoacoustics of future hybrid rocket engines, leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by the EPSRC and Reaction Engines as a CASE award. Candidates should fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award.  Please check your suitability at the following web site:

 http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/Pages/eligibility.aspx

Reaction Engines Ltd is currently developing the SABRE engine, an air-breathing rocket engine designed to power the SKYLON spaceplane up to Mach 5 and transition into rocket mode to reach low-earth orbit. The main novel component of the engine is the pre-cooler, which cools the incoming hot air, allowing the energy extracted to power the engine turbomachinery. At low speeds, the absence of intake shock waves means an extra heat source is required to supply this energy. This is the role of a component known as the pre-burner; a hydrogen flame heats incoming air to provide extra heat through a heat exchanger.

The objective of this studentship is to develop computational tools to study the thermoacoustic stability of the pre-burner. Thermoacoustic instability is caused by a positive feedback between acoustic waves and unsteady heat release rate and/or unsteady heat transfer. It is undesirable as it leads to high amplitude pressure oscillations. Analytical models for the acoustic impedance of heat exchanger tubes in co-flow will be developed. Unsteady CFD simulations of the flame and heat exchanger tubes will be performed, allowing models for the unsteady response of these components to be extracted. The constituent models will be coupled into a unified computational tool that will be able to offer design guidance for instability avoidance.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a 1st class honours degree in engineering or a related subject, strong background in fluid mechanics and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research. An interest in acoustics, heat transfer and computational fluid dynamics is essential, as are good team-working and communication skills.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mechanical-engineering/study/phd/how-to-apply/

For further details of the post contact Prof Aimee Morgans a.morgans@imperial.ac.uk. Interested and eligible applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Prof Aimee Morgans. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled

PhD Studentship in Tribology (Industrially funded project) (Dr Tom Reddyhoff)

Supervisor: Tom Reddyhoff

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of Tribology, leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The studentship is for three and a half years starting spring 2020.  The post is supported by a major vehicle manufacturer. 

The project will investigate the mechanisms by which soot causes problematic wear in heavy-duty diesel engine components.  This is important since understanding soot mediated wear can allow an increase in the amount of soot in engine oil. This will enable vehicles to achieve an optimum CO2 - NOx trade-off, and hence lower emissions.  Current industry standard lubricant tests for used oil fail to predict soot related wear problems in real engines and therefore new analytical techniques are required.  To address this, the PhD project will develop a range of lab-based tests to characterise oil properties and compare with friction and wear measurements. Results of which will form part of an industrial programme utilizing real field data. This will involve working closely with, and travel to, a number of industrial sponsors and academic collaborators.

The PhD will be based in the Tribology Group at Imperial College London.  This is one of the largest Tribology research groups in the world, with extensive experimental and numerical research facilities and an international reputation for research excellence.  The Group includes several PhD students, post-doctoral researchers and academic staff, who perform both fundamental and applied research, and offers a vibrant and multicultural working environment.

The successful candidate will be enthusiastic and self-motivated and will meet the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London.  They will have a background in Mechanical, Aeronautical or Chemical Engineering, Material Science, Physics, Chemistry or a related field together with a strong intellect and an enquiring approach to research.  Excellent team-working, analytical and communication skills are also essential.  Training will be given in tribology and investigative techniques including optical interferometry, advanced material characterisation, and surface topography measurements. The studentship will provide the opportunity to become a skilled communicator, comfortable in an international environment at a world-leading institution.  

The post is supported by a full bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by the industrial sponsor. The position is open to UK and EU (ordinarily resident in the UK throughout the three years period preceding the start of the studentship) students who fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award.

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering/research/phdopportunities/.

For further details of the post contact Dr Tom Reddyhoff at t.reddyhoff@imperial.ac.uk or +44 (0)20 7594 3840.  Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Tom Reddyhoff on the above e-mail address citing “Tribology PhD Studentship” in the email title. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: until post filled

PhD Studentship in Tribology (Dr Tom Reddyhoff)

Supervisors: Dr Tom Reddyhoff

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of Tribology, leading to the award of a PhD degree.  The studentship is for three and a half years starting summer/autumn 2020.  The post is supported by both the EPSRC and Shell Lubricants. 

The PhD project will develop acoustic emission (AE) sensing techniques to monitor and improve the performance of lubricated, machine contacts.  AE sensors detect stress waves that are generated by microscopic events at the interface between sliding components and propagate through material.  Since these deformations result from surface contact interactions and damage, the waves provide a means of listening in on the frictional mechanisms that are occurring.  This provides an important, and currently underutilised, means of assessing both the condition of the lubricating fluid and the energy efficiency of the machine. 

The project will use friction/acoustic experiments (lab-based tests simulating sliding machine interfaces), signal processing (including frequency based techniques and machine learning) and modelling to understanding the underlying mechanisms associated with frictional sound generation. The understanding gained will then be applied to monitor lubricated engine components, first in lab-based simulation tests and then on motored and fully fired engines.  This will involve working closely with, and travel to, a number of industrial sponsors and academic collaborators.

The PhD will be based in the Tribology Group at Imperial College London.  This is one of the largest Tribology research groups in the world, with extensive experimental and numerical research facilities and an international reputation for research excellence.  The Group includes several PhD students, post-doctoral researchers and academic staff, who perform both fundamental and applied research, and offers a vibrant and multicultural working environment.

The successful candidate will be enthusiastic and self-motivated and will meet the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London.  They will have a background in Mechanical, Aeronautical or Chemical Engineering, Material Science, Physics, Chemistry or a related field together with a strong intellect and an enquiring approach to research.  Experience of vibrations and signal processing would be advantageous. Excellent team-working, analytical and communication skills are also essential.  Training will be given in tribology and investigative techniques tribological testing, advanced material characterisation, and surface topography measurements. The studentship will provide the opportunity to become a skilled communicator, comfortable in an international environment at a world-leading institution. 

The post is supported by a full bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by EPSRC and Shell (EPSRC industrial Cooperative Award in Science and Technology – iCASE). The position is open to UK and EU (ordinarily resident in the UK throughout the three years period preceding the start of the studentship) students who fulfil the eligibility criteria for the award.  Please check your suitability at the following web site:

http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/skills/students/help/Pages/eligibility.aspx

To find out more about research at Imperial College London in this area, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering/research/phdopportunities/.

For further details of the post contact Dr Tom Reddyhoff at t.reddyhoff@imperial.ac.uk or +44 (0)20 7594 3840.  Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Tom Reddyhoff on the above e-mail address citing “AE - Tribology PhD Studentship” in the email title. Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: Until post filled

PhD Studentships in Metal Additive Manufacturing (Dr Paul Hooper)

Supervisors: Dr Paul Hooper

Deadline for applying: until post filled

Do you want to be at the forefront of the next industrial revolution? We have PhD studentships available for you to develop additive manufacturing (AM) technology for real-world engineering applications.

Applications are invited for research studentships in the field of additive manufacturing leading to the award of a PhD degree. The posts are supported by bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate).

AM is changing how products are designed and made; enabling better performing and more efficient products with reduced manufacturing waste, lower cost and shorter lead times. It is a key emerging technology in many sectors, from aerospace to medical, and will increasingly provide benefits to the economy, environment and wider society.

The PhD projects will focus in the areas of mechanical characterisation and in-situ process monitoring, to monitor, understand and improve build quality of metal components made via laser powder bed fusion. The students will part of a wider multidisciplinary team at Imperial researching metal AM. The research will be performed using Imperial’s AM facility (that includes three laser powder bed fusion machines, 2 x Renishaw AM250 and Concept MLab), world class materials characterisation and test facilities and high performance computing systems.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College London. You will have a first or upper second honours degree in engineering, physics, computing or a related subject, and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. Applicants should have an interests in one or more of optics, lasers, image processing, real-time control systems, mechanical characterisation, welding and metallurgy. Only UK and EU citizens are eligible for bursary and fees. A passion for engineering, demonstrated by extra-curricular activities or industrial experience is also desirable.  Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

For information on how to apply, go to:

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering/research/phdopportunities/.

For further details of the post contact Dr Paul Hooper (paul.hooper@imperial.ac.uk) or Dr Catrin Davies (catrin.davies@imperial.ac.uk). Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae and cover letter to Dr Hooper on the above e-mail address.  Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

Closing date: Until position filled

Ongoing opportunities

Research groups

The following research groups have flexible funding, which may enable them to provide funding for outstanding PhD students at any time. Please visit the group websites for more information and to get in touch with a member of the group:

Centres for Doctoral Training

You may wish to explore the opportunities offered by the following Centres for Doctoral Training: