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Imperial is proud to have one of the largest cohorts of National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) clinical academic trainees in the UK. We currently have approximately 70 NIHR and locally funded Academic Clinical Fellows in posts across Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and associated Trusts across North-West London.

Please see below for information on how these posts are arranged. 

Accordion widget - NIHR ACF

Academic Clinical Fellowship (ACF) Posts at Imperial College London: 2019

ACADEMIC CLINICAL FELLOWSHIP (ACF) POSTS AT IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON: 2019

There are some important differences to ACF posts for the coming year.  As in previous years, all are aimed at providing early research training and exposure, to facilitate an application for a research training fellowship (PhD or MD).

NIHR has awarded 14 ACF posts to Imperial College London for 2019.   Applications to these posts should be made through the Oriel online recruitment portal.  HEE manages recruitment to these posts on our behalf and application enquiries queries should be made directly to HEE

There are 9 ACF posts available in a range of clinical specialties which will recruited to in the usual way (so called "formula posts"). These are specific to individual clinical specialties, will be advertised in Oriel under the appropriate specialty, and would allow the candidate to develop a research interest in any area at Imperial College London.

In addition we have 5 ACF posts available in cross-disciplinary research themes to which candidates from a restricted selection of specialties may apply.   These research “themed posts” will be advertised separately, and the application form itself may appear on a different specialty page within Oriel from the specialty you are applying for. On the NIHR web site these posts will be labelled as being offered to 2 or 3 specialties simultaneously, but in London we are having initially to offer such posts to a first choice specialty and if unfilled moving into the second or third specialty.  These ACF posts aim to achieve the same outcome, i.e., a research training fellowship, however the proposed research will be restricted to that of the research "theme". Candidates would remain of course as a clinical trainee within their host specialty.

If therefore you win an ACF post in for example Respiratory Medicine (themed therapeutics), then the research you explore in the ACF years MUST be in the area of Therapeutics (at Imperial College London), which would cover the work in Cystic Fibrosis or COPD for example but does not necessarily have to be that suggested in our proposal, although this will be the preferred route. All of our research themes were identified as being major strengths within Imperial College, likely to produce high quality research and training fellowships, and hopefully an outstanding clinical academic future.

Interviews for formula and themed ACF posts may be completely separate.  Clinical interviews will be completely separate!

For all ACF posts, clinical training will be provided in the NW London rotations, amongst the highest rated programmes in the UK, but may not always be in Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust depending on the needs of all trainees within a programme.

For further details about both types of ACF posts available please click the relevant section below.

 

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ACF Posts in “Research Themes” (2019)

ACF Posts in “Research Themes” (2019)

We have 5 ACF posts available in cross-disciplinary research themes to which candidates from a restricted selection of specialties may apply. Applications to these posts should be made through the Oriel online recruitment portal. 


THEME:  Acute Care.   Research focuses on any aspect of acute care.

One Acute Care ACF post at ICL available to trainees in Intensive Care Medicine or Anaesthetics and one in Trauma & Orthopaedic Surgery, Plastic Surgery or General Surgery

Intensive Care Medicine or Anaesthetics

We will provide research training in acute care from our academic departments of Intensive Care Medicine and Anaesthetics, which focus especially on more rapid diagnosis and treatments of patients with sepsis (infection), acute lung injury, multi organ failure, and in peri-operative management and understanding pain. We have major research strengths in these areas and attracting research active trainees from around the UK.  Academic ICM (led by Prof Anthony Gordon, an NIHR Research Professor) undertakes translational studies in critically ill patients. In the RAND Europe analysis (2015) Imperial had the highest percentage of highly cited publications in critical care within England. We have recently completed two NIHR-funded multi-centre trials testing drugs in septic shock, recruiting 1000 patients from >40 ICUs. We are part of the management of the national Genomic Advances in Sepsis consortium discovering polymorphisms that protect patients and a gene-transcription signature identifying patients at risk of early death.

Imperial Anaesthetics & Pain Medicine is one of the leading academic anaesthetic departments in Europe. It has a track record of attracting academic trainees from the entire UK. We lead two major strategic initiatives: (1) London Pain Consortium, funded initially by a Wellcome Trust Strategic Award; (2) Centre for Perioperative and Critical Care Research, a cross departmental partnership supported by the NIHR-Imperial BRC. Notable achievements include novel receptor-specific antibodies to block inflammatory signalling to prevent acute lung injury; Understanding the effect of anaesthetics on organ function. Our group were the first to discover the neuroprotective effects of xenon. Preclinical and early clinical development of the Angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonist EMA401 as a “first in class” analgesic for neuropathic pain, now being developed by Novartis.

 Our trainees have had a high rate of success competing for Research Training Fellowships (3 Wellcome, 1 MRC, 2 NIHR) and being awarded 20 PhDs/MDs in the last 5 years.

Why Intensive Care Medicine (ICM) or Anaesthetics at Imperial?

The clinical/research environment at Imperial is outstanding, with a critical mass of senior staff and trainees. In the 2017 the Center for World University rankings rated Critical Care at ICL as the top university in UK and Europe, 9th in the world. The programme is led by an NIHR Research Professor, Prof Gordon, who is the Chair of the NIHR Critical Care Experimental Medicine group. Imperial has established a “Centre for Perioperative Medicine and Critical Care Research” that brings together clinicians, academics and scientists to carry out leading research. We are a major centre for clinical trials in ICM.

More than 30 clinical fellows have completed higher degrees in the last few years. ICL has an excellent track record in supporting ACFs/CLs through personal mentoring, training & support from the graduate school and postdoctoral fellows centre (eg ethical aspects of research, good clinical practice, public involvement in research, personal effectiveness, leadership), and especially from the Imperial Clinical Academic Training Office (CATO) which provides dedicated masterclasses, careers guidance, additional research funding and access to post-doctoral post CCT fellowships. Almost 90% of Imperial ACFs achieve PhDs, and we run a Wellcome PhD fellowship programme, in addition to supporting access into other PhD schemes.

This programme is fully supported by the clinical training programme directors. Clinical training will rotate through the clinical placements in local NW London trusts as appropriate, and covers the entire curriculum.

Research projects in acute care theme

Appointees can select from ongoing activity in multiple areas of anaesthetic/ICM research that all relate to acute care.

In Anaesthetics:

Investigating the effects of anaesthetics in actually protecting the brain and kidney when deprived of oxygen, and their effects on post-operative brain functioning.

Pioneering work examining the effects of anaesthetic agents on cancer growth and spread.

Examining the mechanisms causing severe heart and lung failure in patients needing heart-lung machines.

Novel ways to minimise transplant organ injury.

 

In Acute Pain: an acute pain research programme under Professor Rice is examining traumatic nerve injury and burn pain in conjunction with the Burns Unit at Chelsea & Westminster. This includes detailed clinical and molecular studies, and exploring the role of novel treatments.

 

In ICM:

Professor Gordon’s group is interested in sepsis in ICU, building on our new genetic data, and discovering new ways of identifying sub-groups of patients at increased risk of early death, and patients who might benefit from novel treatments.

We have a long-standing interest in ventilator-induced lung injury and ongoing research in the underlying causes, developing new treatments strategies including ECMO.

Research is ongoing to identify strategies that target inflammation in the body without suppressing the good immune responses.

Enhancing recovery after critical illness is an important research programme undertaken by our multiprofessional research group. Professor Brett led the NICE guideline development group "Rehabilitation after Critical Illness".

A collaboration with our Computing department is using machine learning to guide critical care management and attempting to find “optimal policies” that maximise patient outcomes.

 

Further information is available from Prof Anthony Gordon (anthony.gordon@imperial.ac.uk), Professor Rice  (a.rice@imperial.ac.uk)


Trauma & Orthopaedic Surgery or Plastic Surgery or General Surgery (the post is being offered in this order to these 3 specialties)

Why Trauma and Orthopaedics/Plastics/General Surgery at Imperial?

The clinical/research environment at Imperial is outstanding, with a critical mass of senior staff and trainees. Imperial hosts the North West London Major Trauma Centre, with a major focus on trauma research. There is access to the Pan-London Major Trauma Research Collaborative (10,000 patients per year). We have strong links to military research via the Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies at Imperial, and the Veterans Trauma Network. An ACF would have access to all these areas. Previous ACFs have moved into PhDs in areas of wearable sensors in trauma, limb reconstruction, tissue engineering, patient safety, and in continuous monitoring of acutely sick patients, all in cross-departmental research.

ICL has an excellent track record in supporting ACFs/CLs through personal mentoring, training & support from the graduate school and postdoctoral fellows centre (eg ethical aspects of research, good clinical practice, public involvement in research, personal effectiveness, leadership), and especially from the Imperial Clinical Academic Training Office (CATO) which provides dedicated masterclasses, careers guidance, additional research funding and access to post-doctoral post CCT fellowships. Almost 90% of Imperial ACFs achieve PhDs, and we run a Wellcome PhD fellowship programme, in addition to supporting access into other PhD schemes.

This programme is fully supported by the clinical training programme directors. Clinical training will rotate through the clinical placements in local NW London trusts as appropriate, and covers the entire curriculum. The programme offers training within world leading centres (ICHT, Royal Marsden, Chelsea and Westminster, Burns unit at Chelsea and Westminster), with access to all subspecialties, acute and elective surgical training, and training in breast reconstruction, cancer reconstructions and more.

 

Acute Care: Trauma and Orthopaedics/Plastics/General Surgery (ACF)

Research projects

This ACF would be overseen by the Department of Surgery and Major Trauma Unit, and work with the Department of Bioengineering (on biosensors and musculoskeletal mechanics). There is close collaboration with the ICL NIHR Patient Safety Translational Research Centre which has a key research theme around wearable sensors and continuous monitoring of patients, and in developing ways for the early detection and treatment of deteriorating health, after trauma, operations and sepsis.

Research projects would include (but not limited to):

Measuring rehabilitation using new technologies after lower limb reconstruction.

Development of devices to measure oxygen supply to tissues in real time, gait analysis, and to help recovery from trauma.

Novel sensing technologies to improve management of acute trauma patients.

Studies on chronic pain after trauma.

Measuring the impact of trauma care on other hospital functions including use of beds, and impact on elective surgery.

Understanding the relationship between peripheral nerve stretching and the generation of chronic pain,  

 

Our team has strong interdepartmental and multidisciplinary collaborations unique to the UK, including with ICL Hamlyn Centre for robotic surgery, and Centre for Blast Injury Studies. Industrial links have led to patents and novel devices and technologies (eg with Google) and we have an entrepreneur in residence.

Academic training will be based on a structured individualised programme leading to a PhD application. There are close links with industry. Surgical trainees will also have training from consultant Geriatricians in the physiology of aging, frailty etc.  Active areas of research include:

Further information is available from Mr Daniel Leff (General Surgery: d.leff@imperial.ac.uk)  Prof Justin Cobb (Orthopaedics: j.cobb@imperial.ac.uk) or Dr Shehan Hettiaratchy (Plastic surgery: shehan.hettiaratchy@imperial.nhs.uk)

 


THEME:  Therapeutics or Clinical Pharmacology.   Therapeutic opportunity exists beyond clinical pharmacology in specialities where application of therapeutics is key.

There is one Therapeutics or Clinical Pharmacology ACF post at ICL available to trainees in Respiratory Medicine

Why Respiratory Medicine at Imperial?

The clinical/research environment at Imperial is outstanding, with a critical mass of senior staff and trainees. ICL has an excellent track record in supporting ACFs/CLs through personal mentoring, training & support from the graduate school and postdoctoral fellows centre (eg ethical aspects of research, good clinical practice, public involvement in research, personal effectiveness, leadership), and especially from the Imperial Clinical Academic Training Office (CATO) which provides dedicated masterclasses, careers guidance, additional research funding and access to post-doctoral post CCT fellowships. Almost 90% of Imperial ACFs achieve PhDs, and we run a Wellcome PhD fellowship programme, in addition to supporting access into other PhD schemes.

Clinical training in respiratory medicine in NW London is one of the most popular respiratory training programmes. Training meets the whole curriculum, using local DGHs and our world class centres at ICHT and the Royal Brompton.

We are at the forefront of research in respiratory medicine, with almost 50% of the UKs output in respiratory research coming from the Royal Brompton Hospital and ICHT. We run the largest Cystic Fibrosis (CF) clinic in Europe, currently running 12 clinical trials and are world leading in gene therapies. We have an integrated research programme around infection, clinical trials and using artificial intelligence especially in CF. This integrates adult and paediatric medicine, respiratory and infectious diseases, and an international network which provides significant added value to the ACF programmes.

Research with therapeutic elements covers COPD, asthma, CF and other chronic lung disease.  Learning from this programme will have application to other chronic respiratory diseases.

 

Potential Research projects

 ICL has major opportunities for research in therapeutics and clinical pharmacology aligned with respiratory medicine: this could include

 Our inhaled antibiotic (iABC) programme is a £50 million collaboration of 17 centres across Europe which will provide experience in clinical trial design, clinical pharmacology and platform sciences.

DNA data, other biomarkers, and CT imaging data will be available from a 200-patient study for analysis and study, with planning for a phase 3 program, which would be an excellent program for an ACF. This program integrates classic clinical pharmacology with patient biomarkers and microbe data. This programme will provide training and platform science and pharmacology with significant input from the drug industry.

An innovative NHS England/ABPI joint program developing an integrated platform for data management and personalised healthcare in people with cystic fibrosis and other chronic lung conditions. This will provide opportunities to integrate sputum microbiology data, with routine blood analysis and patient symptoms and lung tests, to assist people with CF in preventing infections by starting treatments more rapidly. This programme would provide cross disciplinary training and links with innovative start-ups in healthcare.

Collaborations with Bioengineering around biosensors and machine learning will attempt to integrate antibiotic monitoring, patient clinical and laboratory data at times of exacerbations of disease in CF to determine optimal intravenous antibiotic therapy.

Multiple opportunities are available for training in clinical trials research.

Further information is available from Prof Seb Johnston (s.johnston@imperial.ac.uk)   

 


THEME:  Platform Science (-omics) and Bioinformatics.  There have been rapid recent advances in high throughput technologies that allow large-scale assessment of disease process. This is exemplified by advances in genomic medicine and the advent of large-scale genomic diagnosis resulting from the 100,000 genomes project. This includes genomics into the biology of transcriptomics, metabonomics, proteomics etc. and, critically, the underpinning sciences of bioinformatics essential for the utilisation of the technology. 

There are 2  Platform Science and Bioinformatics ACF post at ICL available to trainees in Clinical Radiology or Cardiology and Histopathology and Paediatrics

 

Clinical Radiology or Cardiology

Why Radiology or Cardiology at Imperial?

The clinical/research environment at Imperial is outstanding, with a critical mass of senior staff and trainees. ICL has an excellent track record in supporting ACFs/CLs through personal mentoring, training & support from the graduate school and postdoctoral fellows centre (eg ethical aspects of research, good clinical practice, public involvement in research, personal effectiveness, leadership), and especially from the Imperial Clinical Academic Training Office (CATO) which provides dedicated masterclasses, careers guidance, additional research funding and access to post-doctoral post CCT fellowships. Almost 90% of Imperial ACFs achieve PhDs, and we run a Wellcome PhD fellowship programme, in addition to supporting access into other PhD schemes.

This programme is fully supported by the clinical training programme directors. Clinical training will rotate through the placements in NW London Trusts including world class centres in Hammersmith, Charing Cross, St Marys, Chelsea and Westminster, Royal Brompton, Royal Marsden and local DGHs. Access is available to train in all forms of imaging, and in their use as treatments (eg ultrasound). All cardiac subspecialty training is provided, and in a busy Heart Attack Centre.

ICL provides a unique constellation of scientific and clinical strengths to support training in this theme, including the ICL Data Science Institute renowned for developing large scale analysis and visualisation for complex multi-dimensional data, and we have strong links with engineering, medical image analysis teams, and links with Google DeepMind.

 This bid will support research training in Machine Learning and “radiomics” in imaging and cardiology, to study automated interpretation of diagnostic tests and images in individual patients and large scale population studies. This will use large data sets of patients and their images (scans, Xrays etc).

 

Research projects

Machine learning (artificial intelligence) will be used to analyse images from patients.

Our training offers unparalleled inter-disciplinary expertise from our world-leading imaging centres, well-characterised patient cohorts, and strong links between clinicians and computer scientists and mathematicians at Imperial.

We will apply state of the art techniques to identify markers which will predict prognosis from complex image datasets for different diseases and across organs, focussing both on MRI imaging broadly and cardiac disease. We will be trying to predict the molecular characteristics of tissues from the imaging to improve patient care.

Imperial is world-leading in this field with recent major grants including Prof Rockall’s NIHR Machine Learning In whole Body Oncology study. The UK Digital Heart project from ICL has developed a resource of >10,000 cardiac MRI datasets, all with genetic data, and we have published major research in this field already.

 In cardiology we will continue our world lead in improving techniques for individualised diagnosis, using artificial intelligence on a massive dataset of over one hundred thousand heart scans (MRI and Echo). Using national outcome data, we will aim to demonstrate the importance of new and automated imaging methods in predicting patients outcomes.   Successes so far include: Segmentation of the left ventricle on MRI images, creation of novel methods of dealing with videos in large datasets, optical flow analysis across mitral valves, ECG classification and more. As the dataset is so large, validation would be in the form of all-cause mortality outcomes, and longitudinal changes.

Further information from Dr Declan O'Regan (maternity cover)    Declan.ORegan@nhs.net


 Histopathology or Paediatrics

Why Histopathology or Paediatrics at Imperial?

The clinical/research environment at Imperial is outstanding, with a critical mass of senior staff and trainees. ICL has an excellent track record in supporting ACFs/CLs through personal mentoring, training & support from the graduate school and postdoctoral fellows centre (eg ethical aspects of research, good clinical practice, public involvement in research, personal effectiveness, leadership), and especially from the Imperial Clinical Academic Training Office (CATO) which provides dedicated masterclasses, careers guidance, additional research funding and access to post-doctoral post CCT fellowships. Almost 90% of Imperial ACFs achieve PhDs, and we run a Wellcome PhD fellowship programme, in addition to supporting access into other PhD schemes.

This programme is fully supported by the clinical training programme directors. Clinical training will rotate through the clinical placements in local NW London trusts as appropriate, and covers the entire curriculum. Our programmes are very popular, with close integration between clinical and academic teams. Paediatrics offers training across both teaching hospitals and DGHs, including community settings, with innovative prize winning programmes of outreach into primary care (eg connecting care for children https://www.cc4c.imperial.nhs.uk/). Training is offered in all core and subspecialties.

In histopathology similarly clinical training covers the whole curriculum across several centres, with increasing focus on molecular pathology. The recent development of Northwest London Pathology provides a large clinical resource, with major focus on molecular pathology and genomics, and includes the most up-to-date technologies.

 

Research projects

Candidates will receive cross-departmental training within the broader network of research at ICL.

 Research projects in pathology:

Developing diagnostic algorithms and disease classification based on data from multiple technologies and mathematical models. This will result in the development of a pipeline for rapid interpretation of genomic data for clinical and research use.

Disease stratification: ‘Pathology’ databases will be combined with clinical databases so individual diseases can be better stratified for clinical trials.

We are developing novel molecular methods for the assessment of residual disease (in cancer) for example using serum cell-free DNA (from simple blood testing).

In cancer screening we are exploring novel techniques such as serum cell-free DNA (as a blood test) or “cancer-educated” platelets to identify hidden malignancies.

In paediatrics:

Discovery of diagnostic gene, protein and metabolic signatures for infectious and inflammatory diseases.

Discovery of techniques for prediction of life-threatening infection in febrile children.

Investigation of the relationships between the microbiome (normal gut bacteria) and infectious, inflammatory and allergic disease.

Discovery of signatures of brain damage in new born babies and integration with clinical and MRI data.

Exploration of platform science and computational methods for prediction of long-term outcomes of babies such as adult-onset cardiovascular and psychiatric disorders.

Impact of premature birth on the gut microbiome in early infancy and lung health at school age.

Utilising statistical approaches to analysing complex datasets from birth cohort studies to study asthma and childhood allergy

 

There are strong collaborations with the Centre for Mathematics of Precision Healthcare, Engineering and Materials Science, and more across ICL

 

Further information from Prof Kikkeri Naresh k.naresh@imperial.ac.uk

 

ACF Posts in GMC clinical specialties (2019) ("formula" posts)

ACF Posts in GMC clinical specialties (2019) ("formula" posts) 

There are 9 ACF posts at Imperial College London available in a range of clinical specialties which will recruited to in the usual way. Applications to these posts should be made through the Oriel online recruitment portal.  The posts available are:

  • Cardiology (1 post)
  • Respiratory Medicine(1 post)
  • Gastroenterology (1 post)
  • General Surgery (1 post)
  • Endo & Diabetes Mellitus (1 post)
  • Renal Medicine(1 post)
  • Infectious Diseases (1 post)
  • Paediatrics (1 post)
  • GU Medicine (1 post)

In these specialties appointed ACFs will undertake clinical training in the NW London rotations, and develop a research interest in any area of research within Imperial College. They will be introduced to possible supervisors and be able to explore the very wide range of potential research projects

Recruitment

 Recruitment for all ACF opportunities on the Integrated Academic Training programme is conducted via Health Education England regions and managed through Oriel, the national NHS online recruitment system. For Imperial College London, recruitment to ACF posts is coordinated by the London Recruitment team, based in the Operations Department of Health Education South London and overseen by the NIHR. Details are available on the NIHR website and the London LETB Recruitment site.

Recruitment windows usually open in November/December for posts starting in the following September. ACF opportunities at Imperial College London are available in different specialties each year.

ACF posts are designed to include 25% time learning and carrying out academic research, usually as three-month blocks per year, combined with 75% time in clinical training. The posts are for a fixed term of 3 years. The ACF awards use clinical training opportunities on current GMC approved training programmes. At Imperial, these opportunities are available in most GMC defined medical specialties. Once in the programme, London academic trainees are administratively overseen by the Integrated Academic Training Team (IAT) in Health Education South London. The IAT team has good links with and regularly liaises with members of the Imperial AHSC CATO team on matters relating to the administration of NIHR clinical academic training programmes. Day-to-day management is by clinical and academic supervisors and training programme directors at Imperial.

Eligibility

The ACF programme is aimed at medical trainees usually without a higher degree (PhD/MPhil) with the aim of preparing them to obtain a Clinical Research Training Fellowship or other funding to complete a PhD/MD (Res). Trainees who already have a higher degree may also apply. Imperial College usually has around 20 ACF opportunities available each year in a range of clinical specialties.

  • Appointment to ACF programmes is usually at ST3 level (Specialty Trainee) but may be at CT1, ST1, ST2, ST3 or ST4 depending on the specialty.

Contract

ACFs will have a contract with Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and an honorary contract with Imperial College London. Honorary contracts normally run concurrently with the substantive contract and are issued to allow trainees to work in the organisation where they do not have a substantive contract.

Contracts will be issued by the relevant HR department and coordinated at departmental level by Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare Trust. There are a number of requirements, checks and different forms to fill out in order to finalise the contracts and it can take some time to complete, so trainees are advised to make contact early and establish who their departmental administrators are to assist them with these tasks. This is particularly important for trainees who are new to the College or Trust who will have to complete a more comprehensive process than those who have been employed by Imperial before.

Clinical Academic trainees will also be required to complete other routine HR new starter and induction formalities such as collection of ID cards and completion of induction training activities such as Information Governance Training and other statutory and mandatory training. 

Funding and bursaries

There are currently three sources of funding available to Imperial NIHR academic clinical fellows to support their research. Each fund has a distinct purpose, eligibility criteria and application process - and all three are coordinated through the CATO. Academic trainees are advised to consider their academic training, research consumables and skills development needs early on in their programmes in order to achieve maximum benefit from the funding available. See our funding webpage for further information. 

The three funding sources for ACFs are listed below: 

  • National Institute of Health Research Trainee Coordinating Centre Bursary (NIHR TCC)
  • Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) funding
  • Research Training Award (RTA)

Events

CATO trainee forums and meetings

During the course of each year, the CATO team organises a number of educational events and other activities which clinical academic trainees are strongly encouraged to attend. These are provided to disseminate information, present trainees with opportunities to ask questions, share information and encourage networking, social interaction and support.

Courses and development

During the course of their clinical academic training ACFs are required to attend a range of generic courses to progress their academic and research skills, teaching skills and personal and professional development. These could be courses or workshops delivered internally by Imperial College London (The Graduate School and the Education Development Unit), Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, or by external providers and other organisations. In many cases, trainees could apply for NIHR/CATO funding to cover the costs of attending these courses. Further details about potential areas of learning can be found in the AHSC CATO guide (PDF).

Genomic Medicine

In recognition of the major impact that genomics is expected to have on healthcare research and delivery in future, Imperial aspires for its clinical academic trainees to lead the way by having an understanding of this area.  Through CATO ACFs can be supported to undertake all or part of the MSc in Genomic Medicine at ICL via funding available in the NIHR Research Training Award.  CLs wishing to undertake Genomics modules should contact the CATO Team directly to explore potential funding options. 

ACFS and CLs are encouraged to consider the many potential benefits that training in Genomics can bring to their careers.  Although not a mandatory requirement, CATO strongly encourages the acquisition of knowledge and skills in this area.

Further details about the Genomics MSc can be found on the FoM website.

 

Support and resources

There are a number of individuals who can help and support doctors during their clinical academic training at Imperial, including the CATO team.

Other clinical academic trainees

Through the events organised by CATO and other occasions arranged by each specialty/division trainees will have an opportunity to meet and network with other trainees following academic programmes at Imperial. Trainees are encouraged to take full advantage of these opportunities to meet and stay in touch with others who are in similar situations to themselves, to share experiences and offer and benefit from some peer support.

Departmental administrators

Each of the schools, institutes and departments at Imperial College has administrative divisional/specialty teams who will be able to help academic trainees during their time at Imperial College. To find an up to date list of contacts, visit the Imperial College Faculty of Medicine web pages and search for the administration teams in the Departments section of the Faculty of Medicine.

CATO Guide

The AHSC CATO guide (PDF) is an extensive resource of information about the programme at Imperial, and a useful and important ‘how to guide’ for trainees undertaking the IAT pathway. If you have any further questions please email the CATO team, cato@imperial.ac.uk