Allergy

Hilary Allen

Hilary tells us how she would sum up her experience at the end of her programme.   

Hillary Allen

Why did you choose your course?  

I chose to undertake the MSc Allergy because I didn’t have the knowledge or experience to treat the patients with allergic disease presenting to my surgery on a daily basis. I recognised Imperial is a world renowned centre in both clinical and academic allergy medicine. I felt this course would give me the clinical and research skills I required in order to provide the highest standard of care to my patients and it exceeded my expectations. 

What have you been doing since completing your MSc? 

The MSc qualification afforded me the opportunity to establish a primary care allergy practice, to which other GP colleagues refer. It enabled me to develop relationships with international allergy colleagues and to be appointed to the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) working group for primary care. My MSc research study was published in an American allergy journal and am about to embark on a MD to further develop my research study. 

What’s been your favourite part of the course?  

I really enjoyed acquiring both research and clinical skills. The opportunity to attend outpatient allergy clinics facilitated clinical application of the knowledge learnt in lecturesI also discovered a hidden passion for research by undertaking a research study in my final year. 

What has been the most challenging part so far?  

I think it is daunting for any working professional to return to study but I found the department extremely supportive of this and the facility to review recorded lectures allows you to study at your own pace.   

Is there anything you would recommend to students about to start the course?  

Don’t be afraid to ask for help at any stage throughout the course. The lecturers and course facilitators are extremely helpful and supportive and recognise the unique challenges facing postgraduate students. 

How would you sum up your time on the course in one word?  

Career-defining.


Costas Kotsapas

Costas tells us how he would sum up his experience at the end of his programme.

Costas Kotsapas

Why did you choose your course?  

 I initially attended the Allergic Airway Disease and Asthma, and Rhinitis and Hayfever short courses. I enjoyed them so much that I decided to then enrol for the MSc.

Did you have any issues sourcing funding for your MSc? 

I paid for my tuition fees myself.

What’s the best thing about studying in London?  

I have lived in London for a long  time now. It offers amazing opportunities for attending academic meetings and courses, and also has so much to offer in terms of going out and socialising.

What’s been your favourite part of the course?  

I have enjoyed each part of the course for different reasons. The first year was so important to provide an overall understanding but then I found the second year more interesting as it went into each allergic condition in more depth. Working on the dissertation in my third year has made me push my boundaries and do more independent learning. I feel it has helped me develop more and understand important aspects relating to academia versus clinical work and how they both interlink.

What are you planning to do next?  

I have not decided but on completing the MSc I would seriously consider whether I would like to pursue a Doctor of Medicine (MD) or a PhD. 

Is there anything you would recommend to students about to start the course?  

This is a very exciting course. It has made me fall in love with the world of allergy and has helped to shape my decision in pursuing a career in paediatric allergy that I might not have otherwise!

How would you sum up your time on the course?  

Money well-spent!



Sarah Burrell

Sarah tells us how she would sum up her experience at the end of her programme. 

sarah burrell

Why did you choose your course?  

I wanted to understand the theory behind my clinical work and develop the research skills necessary to help improve the clinical service and treatments currently provided to patients. Allergy is fascinating as there is so much that we still do not understand. 

Did you have any issues sourcing funding for your MSc? 

I was fortunate to be awarded a full Dean’s Master's Scholarship. Without this funding it would have been difficult for me to have undertaken the MSc. 

What’s the best thing about studying in London?  

The diversity of the students and lecturers, and becoming part of a community of allergy specialists who are at the cutting edge of research. 

What’s been your favourite part of the course?  

Interacting with a diverse, motivated and talented group and being taught by some of the world leaders in the field of allergy. 

What has been the most challenging part so far?  

Statistical analysis and coherence.

What have you been doing since completing your MSc?  

I have been working in Singapore on qualitative studies and understanding qualitative data analysis. Moving forward I hope to work with people who have experienced severe anaphylaxis and to understand the impact on their quality of life.   

Is there anything you would recommend to students about to start the course?  

It is a great experience with the right balance between clinical, theory and research. Sometimes the combination of juggling work, personal life and study commitments can be challenging but it is well worthwhileFor those unfamiliar with research, the process to apply and be granted ethics approval can be a daunting task. I would suggest starting early and find someone who can guide you through the process. 

How would you sum up your time on the course in one word?  

Invigorating!


Sophia Kallis

Sophia tells us how she would sum up her experience at the end of her programme.   

Sophia

Why did you choose your course?  

I chose this course as, at that time, I had been working as a paediatric allergy dietitian for two years and wanted to consolidate my learning further. I wanted to develop my allergy knowledge from all perspectives to help me provide more holistic care to my patients and understand their other treatments, e.g. for their eczema or asthma. 

Did you have any issues sourcing funding for your MSc? 

I was fortunate enough to receive funding from my hospital department, as they understood that my learning would be directly applied to my clinical service. I have also received some funding from company reps for individual modules.  

What’s the best thing about studying in London?  

London is such a vibrant and fast-paced city and very multicultural. It attracts students from all over the world and it's been a real pleasure to meet students from varied backgrounds on this course. That in itself is a learning experience and it's great to find out more about how people work in other countries. 

What’s been your favourite part of the course?  

I've really enjoyed the wonderful lecturers we have had on the course. They are all experts in their field and so it is a real privilege to have them come in and teach us.  

What has been the most challenging part so far?  

It has been challenging balancing my job with studies but overall, with the support of the course leaders, it has been manageable. 

What are you planning to do next?  

When I have completed my MSc in Allergy, I plan to use that knowledge in my day-to-day practice. No further plans for studies in the near future, I think I will treat myself to a little break!  

Is there anything you would recommend to students about to start the course?  

Enjoy the lectures and focus on the speakers. All lectures are recorded, so I found it better to focus on the speakers and then make notes from listening to the recorded lectures. Also, try to be organised with coursework and set aside time weekly to work on it and then you can easily work through it all in time. 

How would you sum up your time on the course in one word?  

Rewarding.


Cardiovascular and Respiratory Healthcare

Sulaiman Alsaif

Sulaiman tells us how he felt at the start of his MSc, and how he would sum up his experience at the end of his time with us.

Sulamain

Before

Why did you choose your course? 

I have always wanted to pursue my postgraduate studies at a top leading university that will provide me with the opportunities, knowledge, and support as I improve my clinical and research skills and work towards becoming a better healthcare practitioner. I chose CRH MSc because of its unique program that is led by multidisciplinary lecturers who enthusiastically share their knowledge and expertise with their students. The MSc curriculum covers a wide variety of cardiovascular and respiratory specialities with respect to patient-centred care as well as healthcare at a population level.

What has been the highlight of studying at NHLI for you so far? 

I really admire how the college is embracing diversity throughout its campuses. Studying with colleagues from a wide range of healthcare backgrounds at NHLI is certainly the highlight. The MSc structure and the interactive nature of the sessions enable students to draw upon their own clinical and research backgrounds to enrich our learning experience. 

Did you have any issues sourcing funding for your MSc?

No, not really. Right after the completion of my undergraduate degree, I applied for a scholarship to continue my postgraduate studies. I then received a full scholarship from the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Education (Elite Scholarship Program). I am so grateful for this amazing opportunity.

What do you hope to go onto after completing your MSc? 

In the next few months, I aim to improve my personal, professional, and research skills and to liaise more with professionals and organisations who are contributing to optimise the care of respiratory diseases patients. After the completion of my MSc, I plan to further my studies by pursuing a PhD and become an academic. 

After

We got back in touch with Sulaiman as he was approaching the end of his academic year.  

How did you find your year?  

I would say it was a life-changing experience, and as might be expected. At times, the course felt demanding and stressful. But, honestly, it was challengingly fun! 

What’s been your favourite part of the course? 

The access to endless opportunities! I think one of the perks of being an Imperial student is the access to various academic, professional, and fun opportunities both within and outside the college.

What has been the most challenging part so far? 

Time management for sure! At a postgraduate level you are expected to do a lot of learning in such a short period of time which can be quite challenging. 

What are you planning to do next? 

Taking advantage of the extra opportunities, and the networking gained through my MSc served as great preparation for the next step in my academic journey, a PhD. And yes, I will be staying at Imperial for the next few years, exciting times! 

How would you sum up your time on the course in one word? 

Adventurous.


Priya Reehal

Priya, a part-time MSc student, tells us how she felt at the start of her MSc, and how she would sum up her time so far with us.

Priya

BEFORE

Why did you choose your course? 

As a registered nurse, currently specialising in cardiology I chose the course to help career progression and for my passion of cardiology. I also really enjoy learning new things and taking on challenges. 

What has been the highlight of studying at NHLI for you so far? 

I have really enjoyed meeting new people and being taught by such amazing lecturers and professors. The support has been incredible so far. 

Did you have any issues sourcing funding for your MSc?

I did not experience any issues with funding, I applied for student finance and I pay the fees termly.

What’s the best thing about studying in London? 

The best thing about studying in London has to be the social aspect, the shopping, bars and clubs. There is so much to do with friends and family in between studying. It is sometimes difficult to juggle everything but if you really want something and you put your mind to it, you can do it!

What do you hope to go onto after completing your MSc? 

I hope to become a clinical nurse specialist or to further study at Imperial.

AFTER 

We got back in touch with Priya as she was approaching the end of her first year of her degree. 

How did you find your year?  

This first year has been challenging, but exciting. I’m studying the course over two years on a part-time basis and definitely looking forward to starting the next year! 

What’s been your favourite part of the course? 

Meeting new people and making new friends whilst expanding my knowledge in the specialised field. 

What has been the most challenging part so far? 

Being part-time, time management has been difficult and balancing working full-time and study but it is definitely not impossible!

How would you sum up your time on the course in one word? 

 Amazing!


Genes Drugs and Stem Cells - novel therapies

Emmanuel Okwelogu

Emmanuel tells us how he felt at the start of his MSc, and how he would sum up his experience at the end of his time with us. 

Emmanuel Okwelogu

BEFORE

Why did you choose your course? 

The prospect of studying novel advancements in medical therapeutics in a first-class institute (NHLI) was the main reason why I chose the course.

What has been the highlight of studying at NHLI for you so far? 

During our course, I was fortunate enough to attend the Annual British Thoracic Society (BTS) Winter Conference and had a personal interaction with the former Chief Medical Director of England, Professor Dame Sally Davies.

Did you have any issues sourcing funding for your MSc?

Yes, I had issues sourcing funds due to my financial status, but I was able to secure a loan from Student Finance England as a Home/UK student.

What’s the best thing about studying in London? 

The multicultural diversity in the city of London is very remarkable. Also, Kensington is at the heart of wonderful monuments and exciting exhibitions, for example the Natural History Museum and The Royal Albert Hall. 

What do you hope to go onto after completing your MSc? 

I plan to pursue an Academic career in Advanced therapeutics thus a PhD is the next best thing for me.

AFTER 

We got back in touch with Emmanuel as he was approaching the end of his academic year.  

How did you find your year?  

I would say it was a life-changing experience, and as might be expected. At times, the course felt demanding and stressful. But, honestly, it was challengingly fun! 

What’s been your favourite part of the course? 

The favourite part was the public engagement where I experienced engaging an audience of various backgrounds with what we do in gene therapy at a carnival.

What has been the most challenging part so far? 

The most challenging part was undeniably the six month long research project which in the end turned out fabulous.

What are you planning to do next? 

I'm off to Manchester to start a PhD at the University of Manchester, studying graphene nanomedicine in cancer diagnostics and therapy.

How would you sum up your time on the course in one word? 

Fabulous!


Betty, Qasim and Rebecca

We asked our students to tell us about their experience on the Master's in Genes Drugs and Stem Cells - Novel Therapies.

Genes drugs stem cells student profiles

Yaqi (Betty) Hu

Yaqi 'Betty" Hu is an international student on the MSc in Genes, Drugs and Stem Cells with NHLI.  Betty gives her opinion on how she has found the course, and her time at NHLI.

International students talks about NHLI masters

Yaqi (Betty) Hu

Betty gives her view on the MSc course as an international student.

Yaqi 'Betty" Hu is an international student on the MSc in Genes, Drugs and Stem Cells with NHLI.  Betty gives her opinion on how she has found the course, and her time at NHLI.

Student opinion on MSc course

Qasim Majid

Qasim gives his views on the course so far.

Qasim Majid is a student on the MSc in Genes, Drugs and Stem Cells with NHLI.  Qasim gives his opinion on how he has found the course so far.

A mature student on the MSc in Genes, Drugs and Stem Cells

Rebecca Callingham

Rebecca Callingham is a mature student on the MSc in Genes, Drugs and Stem Cells with NHLI.

Rebecca Callingham is a mature student on the MSc in Genes, Drugs and Stem Cells with NHLI.  Rebecca gives her opinion on how she has found the course, and her time at NHLI.


Mozghon Jeddi

Jeddi student"The MSc in Genes, Drugs and Stem cells was an exceptionally unique and intellectually stimulating course. The course equips you with cutting-edge knowledge of the recent advances in novel therapeutic strategies and will advance your critical analysis abilities. One of the best parts about studying this MSc at Imperial College London is the unique combination of world-class academics and the high calibre of research that ultimately enriches this course".

IfiGeneia Bardi

Ifigeneia Bardi student"I feel very lucky that I participated in this MSc programme. It exceeded my expectations and provided me with all the necessary knowledge I needed. Not only did it equip me with up to date scientific knowledge, but also taught me how to think, write, and deliver my knowledge, through a number of practices. A big advantage of this programme is that it allows you to choose your 6 month project from a wide variety of them and get laboratory experience from excellent scientists. The people were always friendly and supportive, creating an environment I was very happy to work in. If I went back in time, I would definitely choose this programme again!".

Find out more or apply for Genes, Drugs and Stem Cells - Novel Therapies postgraduate courses


Genomic Medicine

Alex Schwinges 

Alex tells us how he felt at the start of his MSc, and how he would sum up his experience at the end of his time with us. 

Alex

BEFORE

Why did you choose your course? 

I was searching for a short and demanding programme linking human genetics and medicine. Originally, I was looking at UK universities simply because masters are only one year here, not knowing how much the whole field is promoted at the moment. That was a welcome surprise. 

What has been the highlight of studying at NHLI for you so far? 

Learning about the massive scope of the 100,000 Genomes Project in one of the early lectures by Professor Mark Caulfield, Chief Scientist for Genomics England, was definitely my highlight. 

What’s the best thing about studying in London? 

London is a great city with many things to do. I love to explore the city, and if I only want to relax I have plenty of friends at the student accommodation I am living at.

What do you hope to go onto after completing your MSc? 

Currently I am looking into various opportunities. The three major career paths are I am looking at are: working for the NHS or Genomics England, innovative startups making use of genomics technologies, drug development or personalised healthcare in large pharmaceutical companies.  

AFTER 

We got back in touch with Alex as he was approaching the end of his academic year.  

How did you find your year?  

I enjoyed touching upon many topics. However, as a result of the programme design, there was no significant student community to speak of and sitting alone for weeks at a time was tough

What’s been your favourite part of the course? 

I really enjoyed working on my MSc thesis. I used a statistical approach called Mendelian Randomisation on UK Biobank data to explore the link between educational attainment and cancer risk. 

What has been the most challenging part so far? 

As I said, working alone on your assignments (only essay-type assignments) made me feel like writing a thesis all-year round. I think it depends very much on the preferences of the person how this is perceived. Some really enjoyed it, for me it was challenging. 

What are you planning to do next? 

I have left London and am looking for jobs around Munich. It is the home of life science in Germany and the best area for corporate and start-up jobs in the field.

How would you sum up your time on the course in one word? 

Broad.


Sunayna and Affy

We asked our graduating students some questions about their time studying the Master's in Genomic Medicine. 

Dr Sunayna Best

Dr Sunayna Best - Genomic Medicine

Why did you choose the MSc in Genomic Medicine?

Dr Sunayna Best talks about the masters in Genomic medicine

Why did you choose the MSc in Genomic Medicine?

Dr Sunayna Best talks about why she chose the masters in Genomic Medicine with NHLI

Dr Sunayna Best talks about the masters in Genomic medicine

What did you enjoy about the MSc in Genomic Medicine?

Dr Sunayna Best talks about what aspects of the masters in Genomic Medicine she enjoyed

Dr Sunayna Best talks about the masters in Genomic medicine

Would you recommend the programme?

Dr Sunayna Best talks about why she would recommend the masters in Genomic Medicine with NHLI

Dr Sunayna Best talks about the masters in Genomic medicine

What will you do next?

Dr Sunayna Best talks about what she will be doing next after the masters in Genomic Medicine


Dr Affy Sepahzad 

Dr Affy Sepahzad - Genomic Medicine

Why did you choose the MSc in Genomic Medicine?

Dr Affy Sepahzad talks about the masters in Genomic medicine

Why did you choose the MSc in Genomic Medicine?

Dr Affy Sepahzad talks about why she chose the masters in Genomic Medicine with NHLI

Dr Affy Sepahzad talks about the masters in Genomic medicine

What did you enjoy about your MSc in Genomic Medicine?

Dr Affy Sepahzad Best talks about what aspects of the masters in Genomic Medicine she enjoyed

Dr Affy Sepahzad talks about the masters in Genomic medicine

Would you recommend the programme?

Dr Affy Sepahzad talks about why she would recommend the masters in Genomic Medicine with NHLI

Dr Affy Sepahzad talks about the masters in Genomic medicine

What will you do next?

Dr Affy Sepahzad talks about what she will be doing next after the masters in Genomic Medicine


Ms Natalie Bolton

Biomedical Scientist, King’s College NHS Foundation Trust

Natalie

What attracted you to the MSc in Genomic Medicine programme?

Having always been interested in genetics the content of the degree really stood out to me, in particular its links with the 100,000 Genome Project and the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge science that is forming future of medicine. The structure of the course – the ability to undertake it part time whilst continuing my full time job within the NHS – was also particularly appealing.

What is most exciting about the course – and being one of the first students to study Genomic Medicine at Imperial?

It’s exciting to be a part of a field that is progressing so rapidly. To be one of the first students builds upon the feeling that what we are learning, and how we apply these knowledge and skills, is truly pioneering science.

What are your ambitions for your time at Imperial?

I would like to learn as much as possible and be able to transfer my new knowledge and skills into the workplace.

How do you think the course will impact your future career?

Obtaining an MSc will open a lot of doors in terms of career progression for me. Genomic Medicine is such a vast subject area, and applicable to so much, that I believe it will enable me to have more options for future career fields. 

Find out more or apply for Genomic Medicine postgraduate courses


Medical Ultrasound

Davina Sadyakeethy

Davina tells us how she felt at the start of her MSc, and how she would sum up her experience at the end of her time with us. 

Davina

BEFORE

Why did you choose your course? 

I chose this course as I believe it will equip me to progress in my career. Working as a cardiac physiologist, my BSc trained me within all cardiac investigations except echocardiography. I knew I had to train in a hospital in order to progress and learn ultrasound. When I found this course online, I instantly knew it fulfilled what I needed. Not only will it help me learn ultrasound practically, it will also help me to broaden my research skills. 

What has been the highlight of studying at NHLI for you so far? 

For me the highlight has definitely been meeting fellow students, professors and learning about upcoming research. 

Did you have any issues sourcing funding for your MSc?

I applied for a postgraduate student loan. This covers my tuition fees and as I worked previously, I had some of my own savings for living costs.

What’s the best thing about studying in London? 

The environment is amazing. There is so much to do, places to eat and meeting different people.

What do you hope to go onto after completing your MSc? 

I hope to complete my MSc and go back into working for the NHS, hopefully after obtaining this MSc I am able to apply for a higher band, continue to progress and learn more skills within the ultrasound field. 

AFTER 

We got back in touch with Davina as she was approaching the end of her academic year.  

How did you find your year?  

I found my MSc really interesting. I was able to learn new skills and knowledge, as well as make new friends.

What’s been your favourite part of the course? 

Definitely meeting new people and the diversity of Imperial! 

What has been the most challenging part so far? 

The time management of revision and social life. 

What are you planning to do next? 

I will be staying in London and have been offered a job for a private healthcare clinic where I will be utilising the skills that I learnt during my masters.

How would you sum up your time on the course in one word? 

Eventful


Zahra Sheikh

Zahra Sheikh

What did you most enjoy about your programme?
Having the opportunity to learn from some of the UK's pre-eminent experts on Echocardiography. Being able to socialise with a like-minded cohort of students from across the globe. Finally, that my placement was arranged to be at renowned institutes across London where I was able to put my theory into practice under the guidance of skilled and experienced technicians.

What did you most appreciate about studying at Imperial?
The open-door policy of the lecturers and their willingness to ensure that we students understood their teachings. The resources including the excellent library were something I very much appreciated.

What are you doing now?
I'm very happy to say that I was offered a position at the hospital I had my training at which I've gladly accepted, and now am enjoying helping the new MSc students with their placements.


Catherine Stowell - MSc Medical Ultrasound (Echocardiography)

Catherine StowellWhat did you most enjoy about your programme?
I really enjoyed the diversity of the course. We covered so many topics and disciplines; the course was constantly stimulating and challenging. All of our lectures were delivered by people who are true experts in their field. It was such an honour to be able to learn from them.

What did you most appreciate about studying at Imperial? 
My colleagues, the teaching staff, and the library. I loved having access to such a wide range of academic journals, and feeling that I had complete freedom to learn.

How did it feel to receive the Dean's Prize for your programme? 
I’m delighted and overwhelmed. I feel extremely lucky, because I was part of an excellent group of students. We all helped and encouraged each other, learnt from each other, and supported each other. The teaching staff were exceptional, as were the Echocardiographers at Hammersmith Hospital. It is wonderful to receive a prize, but it’s really thanks to the environment I was in.

What do you plan on doing after graduation?
I’ve really enjoyed working on the project part of the course, which we’re currently finalising into a full study. I will see what happens after that – I would love to stay involved in research projects in some way. Of course, I also want to keep up my practical scanning skills, and I also run my own business, which is currently focused primarily on veterinary ultrasound. I need to find a way to combine all of these things!