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Project Coordinator
Dr Kevin Murphy
k.g.murphy@imperial.ac.uk

Course Administrator
Ms Olive Thomas
o.thomas@imperial.ac.uk

Endocrinology introduction

Endocrinology introduction
Pathway overview [download pdf]Attend the iBSc Science Fair

Introduction

The Endocrine system provides a critical means of communication within the body and maintains a constant internal milieu in the face of an ever-changing external environment. It is thus essential for survival and adaptation throughout life and plays a key role in the balance between health and disease.

This course will comprise a two-week Introductory course, three five-week taught modules and either a research project or a specialist course option (two five-week modules).

The Course Director is Professor Glenda Gillies (g.gillies@imperial.ac.uk).


Aims and objectives

  • To encourage and develop the student’s motivation, originality of thought and breadth of vision
  • To provide a supportive learning environment, underpinned by world class research
  • To provide distinctive modules within appropriate areas of endocrinology, drawing on the expertise and strengths of our academic staff
  • To produce graduates well trained in laboratory and research skills
  • To foster the ability to work independently and as part of a group, and to develop presentation skills, both written and oral
  • To provide an insight into the major areas of interest in Endocrinology at both the basic science and clinical levels as well as an understanding of state-of-the-art technology that is used to further research in the field
  • To ensure that students are familiar with the fundamental principles of endocrine communication within the body, the underlying molecular events which support these processes, the pathological states that emerge when these processes malfunction and opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic targets

With the exception of BSc Management and BSc Biomedical Engineering, all of Imperial College's intercalated BSc courses are split into Parts A, B and C. Parts A and B run from September until February and comprise teaching on the BSc course topic. Part C, which runs from March until May, gives students the opportunity to undertake a project.

The BSc project is a ten-week research project, which gives students a valuable opportunity to learn about scientific research. The project is assessed via an oral presentation of the project (25% of Part C marks) and a 5000-word project write-up (75% of Part C marks). Examples of the type of projects available can be found in this list of past BSc project titles (PDF).